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Marigold Flowers on Order

Marigold Flower Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

When we learned more about Marigold we fell in love with the flower all over again. When we first began the garden we had a huge ant problem. The ants came out in a full fledge army not just a few. They were moving significant amounts of soil and uprooting plants and seedlings by digging from bottom up right in their pots. So, when we learned that ants disdained them, we got several seed packets and placed them strategically around the garden. It took some time but our ant problem was soon reduce to almost non existent. When one first starts gardening, one wonders will these organic remedies work? Am I doing it right? We have remained true to our organic journey and did not use any chemicals while growing our plants. The Marigolds have been no exception. In fact they helped us along our organic journey.

Many neighbors and gardening cohorts come by from time to time to view the plants in containers and the garden. When one of our neighbors came over and saw the marigolds he immediately put in an order. They are coming along very nicely as one can see. Once they have grown and are more easily managed, they will go home to his mother. Want to take a plant of your own home? Shop our plants. Would you like to start your own garden? Wonderful! What questions do you have? Share your comments with the community by positing them below. Share the wealth with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Harvesting Dill

Dill Plant Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Dill was one of the plants we began early in February in our mini greenhouse aka our garage. She struggled for a while and was re-sown a few times. Eventually, dill was put outside away from the other greenhouse plants because she, along with several other plants, showed risk of disease. To prevent disease from spreading to other plants in the greenhouse we placed dill outside on the back porch in the fresh air where disease would be discouraged more given the limitations of our particular greenhouse.

She started to show some promise by sporting a couple of leaves. We then repotted her and moved her to the front porch where we could keep a closer eye on her and further away from insects. She began to flourished. She just loved being outdoors on the porch. Dill seems to be a perfect container, urban or kitchen plant. She has done very well in her pot. So, much so we could not resist harvesting a few leaves for a shrimp and lemon cream sauce dish. We used a few leaves as garnish.

Scroll up and down…learn more about greenhouses. We read this book. It helped us turn our struggling greenhouse plants around.

We learned a few lessons while harvesting. Because herbs like dill can only be harvested at about a third at a time, it is best to plant several plants or 3 times as much as you would want to harvest at one time. The plant needs the remaining leaves to photosynthesize and continue the growing process. What do you need to start your own container plant? Just want to pick up a plant all ready to go? Shop our plants. What are the benefits of having fresh herbs on demand? Share your comments with the community by posting below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Harvesting Green Beans

Harvesting Green Beans
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

We will be harvesting Green Beans soon. We only have a few Green Beans but they are beginning to get big. The plant itself is still very short compared to how tall it will grow. Yet and still the Green Beans are ripening. What did you learn about harvesting? What did you learn about Green Beans? How will this help you in your garden. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep growing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Compost & Coffee Grounds

In are article yesterday we discussed composting: how to compost and what the benefits are of composting. This reminded one of our readers of the benefits of one of her favorite drinks, coffee, to composting. Click here to view her comment. Consequently, we decided to talk a little more about this nitrogen rich resource. So we sought out gardeningknowhow.com for a little more clarification on the topic.

As we discuss urban environments, coffee is an ideal source for compositing and fertilizing for the gardener in more urban settings. Unlike other sources of composting materials coffee grounds produce fewer concerns for disease and can be added to a compost mix or added directly to the soil as a fertilizer. While you are composting your coffee grounds you can also add your coffee filters to your compost pile or mix.

When adding coffee grounds to your compost mix remember that they are considered green compost and will thus need a brown compost material added to it in the proper ratio (2:1. 2 parts green to one part brown). If you add ground coffee to soil as a fertilizer, it will not directly add nitrogen to soil however it will:

  • add organic material to the soil
    • improves drainage
    • improve water retention
    • improve aeration in the soil
  • help microorganisms beneficial to plant growth thrive
  • attract earthworms

Unwashed coffee grounds can

  • lower the pH (or raise the acid level) of soil, which is good for acid loving plants

Fresh coffee grounds are acidic while used coffee grounds are neutral. If you rinse your used coffee grounds, they will have a near neutral pH of 6.5 and will not affect the acid levels of the soil. To use coffee grounds as fertilizer, work the coffee grounds into the soil around your plants. Leftover diluted coffee works well like this also.

There are several other uses for used coffee grounds in gardening:

  • keeping slugs and snails away from plants
  • some people also claim that coffee grounds act as a cat repellent and will keep cats from using your garden as a litter box
  •  worm food if you do vermicomposting with a worm bin

What do you have around the house that you can use in your composting? Remember if you only have plants around the house, you can also do this: use your old coffee grounds. Separating organic endeavors from environmental endeavors is difficult because they both pay homage to nature and are essentially the flip side of the same coin. How can re-purposing items you typically throw away help you save money? What can that do for the environment? How can composting even on a small scale improve the quality of your food and health? What is the one food you eat the most of? How can growing that one food change your health and diet? Share your comments with the community by positing them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.