Posted on Leave a comment

Keeping Cayenne Coming

cayenne pepper Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Staked "Korean Lettuce" Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

We know a few of you are like us: you like it hot. So, when it was discovered that we had cayenne pepper in the garden, it was welcomed. We have our first fruits from our cayenne plant. We recently had to stake our “Korean Lettuce” plant, as described by one of the staff at the international market where we picked the seeds up from, because it was growing more vertical and in the way of the cayenne plant. The cayenne plant has put out a lot of leaves probably to grow from under the canopy of the “Korean Lettuce”, so we finally staked her today to get her to grow more upright and to stop her canopy from growing over the cayenne plant. We hope to get more peppers from the cayenne plant now that we have done this.

Our “Korean Lettuce” is also sporting some beautiful flowers. This is typically a sign that a plant is either about to bear fruit or die. We were not sure what to make of our “Korean Lettuce” because the directions were all in Korean and we had so little information to go on. So, we planted her anyway and have kept a close eye on her. Since it is suppose to be a lettuce like plant we are really not expecting any vegetables from her. So, we clipped a few leaves as if to harvest. But, once they have flowered then they seed and die because the plant has not been harvested and it feels its cycle is ended. So, we shall see what happens to this plant. Stay tuned for updates. Have you begun your own garden like several others? What do you think of the Wilson Victory Garden and the gardens that several people have started in the wake of the COVID 19 pandemic? Does a garden seem more useful than ever? Michelle Obama had a garden before there was a pandemic. Some people are just ahead of their time!


Cayenne Plant Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Cayenne Plant Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Posted on Leave a comment

How to Stake Tomato Plants

Early Girl Tomato Plant
How to Stake Tomatoes
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Just when you thought you were all done with school, here we are taking you back to school. Schools are an excellent resource for the farmer and gardener. Here we can see from the University of Maine, known to have a farm or two (Maine), how to effectively stake plants. What did you think about the use of t shirts and stalkings as a tie? What did you learn from the video? How can you use what you learned in the video? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Posted on Leave a comment

Staking Tomato Plants

Green Roma Tomato

This weekend a neighbor and gardening cohort came over to see about the garden. His presence is always welcome and especially so this weekend. While here he gave us some tips on staking plants. We recently visited our local nursery / local small business to obtain some information and materials to stake our tomato plants, one of which has grown taller than me. This is not all that hard to do. But for a tomato plant that came to us as a little plant-ling that stood just above our ankles it is impressive to see.

Pictured above is the traditional pole like stake along with the round cage (red) used for staking plants. Some plants like tomatoes and beans can be climbers but their vines alone can not support the fruit they bare, so staking helps give the plant the extra support it need to grow and bare fruit. Our tomato and bean plants will climb up these stakes and cages as they grow tall and hopefully produce a bountiful harvest.

As you can see from the beautiful, yet very rounded, Roma tomato some of the tomato plants already have tomatoes on them. This one fell off while we were staking the plants. So, we said oh well. We guess we will have to eat that one. As you can see it is on the window seal for ripening. As always we want to give a huge thank you to all of our supporters and enthusiasts. We love it when you come visit! Have you been to visit our community garden? If not, when do you plan to visit? Will you bring a friend along with you? We hope so. Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Posted on Leave a comment

How is the Garden?

As you already know, one of the number one questions we get is: how is the garden? This question helped to encourage this site. The answer is a lot of good things are happening in the garden. While we still are keeping our eye out for slugs, snails and flies, for the most part they seem to be under control. But, Mother Nature is always full of surprises. So we will be keeping our eyes peeled. We have seen a few snails here and there. They are tricky because you do not always know what is in the shell. We currently have been treating the garden with the Organic Pest remedy: Oatmeal. Stay tuned for updates on if this Organic Remedy for snails is effective.

The Vole seems to have been taken care of. We have seen no more signs of eaten leaves although there are still a few flies around. The ants however seem to be our most difficult pest. We have been doing a regimen of ground black pepper and water solution, fertilizer for the plants health, marigold flowers (which ants dislike) and Neem Oil, all which should help. Some help more than others. Overall our Organic Remedies have worked although the verdict is still out on the ants, snails and slugs.

Our Roma Tomatoes, San Marzano Tomatoes, Squash, Pumpkin, Sugar Baby Water Melon and Green Bean Plants are all doing very well. They have developed root systems and have begun multiplying their leaves and growing tall. We believe a Vole was causing a lot of havoc in the garden. Now that we have addressed that problem the garden seems to be taking off. Two of our bean plants have been leaning over. Their stalks are very tall, lean and can normally bear the weight of its fruit (beans) thus far. However, we identified two bean plants that needed some additional support so; we staked them with a few wooden paint stirrers that we got from the paint section for free. We will still have to keep our eyes open for flies, snails and slugs so they do not eat the leaves and the harvest. We thus continue to treat the plants with Neem Oil (an Organic Pest Remedy).

Have you started a garden? Do you have house plants? Send us pictures and leave us a comment telling us all about it. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep growing. Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Posted on Leave a comment

Saving Time in the Garden

Garden Sprayer

We do not have many big tools in our garden tool box but, we have a few key tools that have begun to save us a ton of time. The sprayer pictured above is holds a gallon. It pumps the air out of the container and you hold the lever down for a continuous spray powered by air pressure. The more pressure the more liquid sprayed. There are sieves to filter the liquid so, what you put in the container must be fairly liquid. For things that are less liquid like our ground pepper and water mix we use the water can. We can more than cover our garden space with 2 passes of the water can. The holes in the water can are larger and should be able to hold most mixtures you apply to your garden.

Besides watering the garden, we also fertilize on a regular basis. We have also been applying different mixtures to the soil and plants to discourage pests. You will find that your Organic Remedies are less processed than chemical remedies and, thus may require a water can or sprayer that can hold a less refined liquid.  Thus far the water can, oscillating sprinkler and sprayer are all we need to apply what we need to the garden as well as save time. The most expensive item was the water can because we opted for metal over plastic. There is always something to do in the garden so, anytime we can automate or save time in a manner that makes financial sense for our size garden we do so.

Did you know that you can use wooden paint stirrers to stake smaller plants? Do you know how to stake a plant? Read our article “Stake Holder” dated May 9, 2020 to learn more about staking. Curious as to how you can save time in your garden? Just Ask! Did you know that you can get globes that water your house plants as needed? All you do is fill the globe. Want to know more? Just Ask. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep growing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.