Posted on Leave a comment

A Quick Guide to Growing Onions Indoors

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Onions

Source: Properly Rooted
Home – Gardening – A Quick Guide to Growing Onions Indoors

When growing onions indoors, make sure your plants have enough space and light. Onion plants need six to ten inches of depth for proper root growth and bulb formation. Leave three inches between each onion plant. Scallions or smaller varieties can be planted more closely together.

Onion plants need between 12 to 16 hours of light, varying by whether they are long-day or short-day onions. Supplement sunlight with artificial light if needed. While you can start with onion seeds or sets, you can easily turn leftover onion bulbs or sprouted onions from your kitchen into an indoor garden.

Choosing a Type of Onion

Onions are hardy plants and easy to grow inside. Green onions, or scallions, are popular with indoor and casual gardeners because of how easily they grow. Bulb onions require a little more space than scallions but can be grown in pots, containers, and even plastic water bottles.

When choosing a type of onion, your location is the main factor to consider. There are two main types of onion, and this has nothing to do with variety or taste: long-day and short-day onions.

Long-day means the onions need 14 to 16 hours of daylight to form bulbs. Short-day varieties need 12 to 14 hours of sun each day. Fortunately, you don’t need to calculate how many hours of sunlight your yard receives each day. Just look at your latitude.

Climates above the 35th parallel are cold, but actually, have longer days in spring and summer. Below the 35th parallel, the weather is warmer but days have fewer hours of sunlight. If you live up north, choose a long-day onion, and in the south, stick with short-day plants.

Now there are also day-neutral onions on the market, an alternative for any location.

What You’ll Need to Get Started

Here are a few of the supplies you need to grow onions indoors:

  • a container
  • soil (or just water)
  • onion seeds, onion sets, or onion scraps from your kitchen
  • additional light source (optional)

Choosing a Container

Onions need containers that are six to ten inches deep. The width of the container is up to you and the space you have available.

While it’s not impossible for onions to grow in containers shallower than six inches, the depth affects quality and size. Deeper containers allow for more root growth and space for the bulbs to expand. Even if you’re growing giant onions indoors, you don’t need a container more than ten inches deep.

Feel free to get creative with your indoor onions. You can grow single onions in a plastic bottle, as shown in this quick tutorial below:

It’s also possible to grow enough onions to make up a small garden in just a plastic bottle. Bottle onion growers with holes along the sides have gained popularity for their aesthetics and novelty. You can try this for yourself with a five-liter bottle and some spring onion bulbs.

Soil for Growing Onions

Onions aren’t particularly picky when it comes to soil. Most nutrient-rich soils will be enough for onion plants. A simple potting mix will usually be enough.

While onions grow fine in most soils, they will struggle if the soil is too acidic. The pH level of your soil should be 6.5 or higher for onions. If the pH is too low, you can use ground limestone to decrease the acidity.

If you want to give your onions a little more care, consider using a nitrogen-rich fertilizer. Onions thrive on nitrogen, which can increase the quality and size of your bulbs. Fertilizers containing ammonium sulfate or ammonium nitrate are healthy for onion plants.

Going without Soil

As we’ve seen in the plastic bottle tutorial, it is possible to grow onions in just water. Soil will provide onions plants with more nutrients, but if you’re just looking for convenience, stick onion sprouts or bulbs into a glass of water and watch them grow.

Here’s a video demonstrating how easy it is to grow green onions in water. The gardener compares green onions grown in soil with plants grown in only water.

Despite the results of this quick experiment, we wouldn’t completely discount the power of soil and a good fertilizer.

Onion Seeds or Starter Plants

Just like you would find in a garden, you can grow onions indoors from seeds or onion sets. However, you might find all the ingredients you need among your kitchen leftovers.

We typically cut off and discard the end of an onion, where the roots would grow. Instead of throwing this part away, place it in water or moist soil and let it sprout.

Sometimes onions begin to sprout on their own. If you find onion sprouts in your pantry, consider it a head start for your indoor garden! Carefully cut any onion flesh away from the sprout. Then plant it in your container and water.

Green onions grow especially well without much care. To start growing green onions you can use vegetables purchased from your local grocery store. As in the video above, save the bottom of the plants, taking care not to damage the white part of the stalk or the roots. Place these in soil or water and watch them grow.

ONION SEEDS AND SETS

If you’re going the traditional route and starting with onion seeds, sow them in a container of your choice. The size of this first container isn’t important because your goal is to let the seeds germinate. You can choose one container for all of your onion seeds, or use a partitioned container to keep them separate.

If using a partitioned container, place at least two seeds in each cell to ensure at least one seed will germinate. Otherwise, in a large container, spread seeds evenly in the soil and then a light layer of soil on top.

Onion sets are small, immature onions used for growing. Like seeds, you can place them in a partitioned container, one set per cell, or space them out in a wider container. Even though they have more form than seeds, it’s best to let them sprout and grow for a bit before giving them more space.

Allow the seeds to germinate, or your onion sets to sprout. Let them grow for about four to six weeks or until the plants are around three inches high. If you have too many, choose the healthiest plants and move them to a container that is six to ten inches deep.

Enough Light for your Onions

When growing onions indoors, space is usually the biggest concern. However the next part you need to worry about is light.

Onions are sensitive to light cycles, meaning they need a certain amount of light each day to bulb at the appropriate time. We know onions need 12 to 16 hours of light a day, depending on their type.

In the winter or late fall, it may be impossible to get this much sunlight. Plants indoors nearly always get less sunlight than outdoor plants.

You can get your onions the necessary amount of light by supplementing with artificial light. Fluorescent and incandescent lights are enough, but there are also a variety of grow lights available. Don’t forget that plants also need dark hours to mimic the day-night cycle, so don’t leave your lights on 24/7.

Which onion variety will you grow? Why? Send us pictures.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Posted on Leave a comment

White House Kitchen Garden

Inside the White House: The Kitchen Garden

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
The White House Kitchen Garden
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

The White House has an incredible garden. The Chefs got really involved and enjoyed pulling food from the garden that adorned the plates of dignitaries. Its amazing to something go from a seed to a full fledged vegetable or fruit on your plate. Do you think if you grew your own foods your children would eat more fruits and vegetables? Do you think if you ate more fruits and vegetables that your children will eat more fruits and vegetables? Do you think eating more fruits and vegetables would improve your health? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Posted on Leave a comment

Hydroponic Gardening

Hydroponics at Home

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Hydroponic Gardening
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

True Organic Growers like Eliot Coleman do not grow hydroponically. They believe that food and plants should be grown and need soil to grow as nature intended. Soil is the source of plants’ foods. Without soil plants are feed nutrients in a non biological manner and process. Many people like hydroponics. Would you consider growing your food hydroponically? What do you think the benefits would be? What do you think the drawbacks would be?

Learn more about True Organic Growing – Eliot Coleman’s “The New Organic Grower”

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Posted on Leave a comment

Marigold Flowers on Order

Marigold Flower Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

When we learned more about Marigold we fell in love with the flower all over again. When we first began the garden we had a huge ant problem. The ants came out in a full fledge army not just a few. They were moving significant amounts of soil and uprooting plants and seedlings by digging from bottom up right in their pots. So, when we learned that ants disdained them, we got several seed packets and placed them strategically around the garden. It took some time but our ant problem was soon reduce to almost non existent. When one first starts gardening, one wonders will these organic remedies work? Am I doing it right? We have remained true to our organic journey and did not use any chemicals while growing our plants. The Marigolds have been no exception. In fact they helped us along our organic journey.

Many neighbors and gardening cohorts come by from time to time to view the plants in containers and the garden. When one of our neighbors came over and saw the marigolds he immediately put in an order. They are coming along very nicely as one can see. Once they have grown and are more easily managed, they will go home to his mother. Want to take a plant of your own home? Shop our plants. Would you like to start your own garden? Wonderful! What questions do you have? Share your comments with the community by positing them below. Share the wealth with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Posted on Leave a comment

What your Plants need from Soil

How to Fertilize Indoor Plants | A Beginner's Guide

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Fertilizing Plants
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Soil is the life line of your plant. Your plants get nutrients from the soil. The soil is where your plants draw some of its ‘food’ from. So, whether it is a house plant or a garden plant, one must make sure that it is properly fertilized. House plants must have fertilizer because it depletes its soil and is not outside. Plants in outside soil may or may not be properly replenished by being outside, so it is still important to make sure that your plants get the appropriate fertilizer aka ‘food’ aka nutrients it needs from the soil. In fact when one waters one should water the soil rather than the plant. How has this article helped you? Ever wondered why your house plans seem to die slowly? But you watered it, right! What is the importance of fertilizing plants particularly plants in containers? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Posted on Leave a comment

How to buy food

vitamin d sun shidonna raven garden and cook

The New Organic Grower by Eliot Coleman has been essential to us in understanding how to buy food. It also helped us understand what our food should look, how it should be produced, processed and labeled. It also left us with concerns regarding transparency in the food industry and how our foods are labeled. In this day in age where scientists seem to be making more contributions to food production and processing than farmers, Eliot’s book reminds us that the growth, not production, of food is a biological process that begins in the soil not a scientific process that begins in a lab. When we look at many of our foods and the additives as well as preservatives in them, we can see there is a reason to be concerned about the things we are knowingly or unknowingly consuming. Eliot’s book is the beginning of understanding and knowledge of food and how science has taken food production away from this biological process.

To understand how to buy food appropriately we must first begin by reading our food labels and asking questions regarding the foods we buy. How were they grown and processed? Where do they come from? How far do they come? Coleman helps us understand what organically grown food means, looks like and how it is processed. It was one of our most helpful reads and can be found below. Where do you buy your foods? Are they organic? Are they locally grown? Share your comments below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

scroll up and down

Posted on Leave a comment

Sow What! The Basics of Sowing

apple seed gala shidonna raven garden and cook

Sometimes its good to get back to the basics so, lets talk about the basics of sowing. Sowing is the beginning of gardening. After you prepare the soil, form your rows and select your seeds, one must sow the seeds in order to get started. There are a few different ways to sow. One can have a water garden, container garden, a garden with beds, a garden in a greenhouse or in the ground directly. This basically boils down to 3 forms of sowing: in a container. That may include a pot or a bed. Or in the ground. Or in water. We will be covering the 2 main ways to sow: either in the ground directly or in a container such as a pot or a bed. This will cover the basics, should you require more information just post a comment and we will give you more specific details.

Sowing in a Container

Sowing in a container involves selecting soil rather than preparing the soil on the ground. You will also have to select a container. Its important that your container has a hole in the bottom to allow for water to drain. This prevents over watering. We are partial to clay pots because its organic and ideal. Metal can scorch a plant. Glass can be difficult to find but a good choice. Plastic is just not apart of our Organic Journey. The clay pot can be glazed or not. It is recommended that your tray be glazed to prevent the surface your container is on from getting moist from the water from your pot. Choose a location with the proper amount of light. Give your plant the proper amount of water and fertilize the soil so the plant can continue to pull nutrients from the soil.

Sowing in the Ground Directly

Sowing in the ground directly involves tilling, fertilizing and forming the soil into rows that will allow enough space for specific plants to grow. Each plant will need a different amount of space. Preparing the ground soil is a lot more involved since it is not all in the bag. This can get very involved including testing the soil, composting and green manures. Similar to container gardening you want to give your plants the correct amount of water and light for the plant as well as fertilize your soil on a regular basis to replenish the soil with nutrients as the plants pull the nutrients they need. This is why crop rotation is popular with farmers because different plants will pull different nutrients from the soil. To even this process out they move crops around to prevent one nutrient from being pulled from a particular spot until there is not more.

Many people are beginning gardens because of COVID 19. Now is the time to get started! What would be the benefit to you and your family to start a garden? How much do you think you can save on your grocery bill? How much do you think you could save by obtaining a plant from us to maintain and continually harvest?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

sowing flower seeds shidonna raven garden and cook
sowing flower seeds shidonna raven garden and cook
These are the seeds from MiMi’s Flower
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Cynoglossum amabile flower
Cynoglossum amabile flower
Today Mimi’s plant is bigger than this!
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Posted on Leave a comment

Organic Soil Fertilizers

By: Anne Baley

Organic materials in the garden are more environmentally friendly than traditional chemical fertilizers. What are organic fertilizers, and how you can use them to improve your garden? What are Organic Fertilizers? Unlike commercial chemical fertilizers, organic fertilizer for gardens is typically made up of single ingredients, and can be matched to your garden’s particular nutritional needs. The various types of organic fertilizer can come from plant, animal or mineral sources, depending on what chemicals your garden requires. In order to qualify as an organic fertilizer, the materials must naturally occur in nature. Fertilizer for organic gardening isn’t the quick and instant fix that chemical fertilizers can be. With organics, you have to let moisture and beneficial organisms break down the content of the fertilizer material in order for the plants to get to the nutrients inside. In general, half of the nutrients in an organic fertilizer ingredient can be used the first year it is applied, and the rest of it is slowly released in the years to come, feeding and conditioning the soil. Different Types of Organic Fertilizer for the Garden .

What is the best organic fertilizer to use?

There are a number of organic fertilizers from which to choose. There may be all-purpose chemical fertilizers, but this doesn’t exist in the organic side of gardening. Different organic fertilizers add different nutrients and ingredients to the soil. The materials you need depend completely on your soil and the plants you are growing in the garden.

Plant-based fertilizers

Plant-based fertilizers break down quicker than other organics, but they generally offer more in the way of soil conditioning than actual nutrients. These materials, such as alfalfa meal or compost, help to add drainage and moisture retention to poor soils. Other plant-based fertilizers include: Cottonseed meal Molasses Legume cover crops Green manure cover crops Kelp seaweed Compost tea.

Animal-based fertilizers

Animal-based fertilizers, such as manure, bone meal or blood meal, add lots of nitrogen to the soil. They’re great for leafy plants and strong growth in the early weeks of gardening. Additional animal-based fertilizers for the garden include: Fish emulsion Milk Urea (urine) Manure tea Mineral-based fertilizers.

Mineral-based fertilizers

Mineral-based fertilizers can add nutrients to the soil, as well as raising or lowering the pH level when needed for healthy plant growth. Some of these types of organic fertilizer are: Calcium Epsom salt (magnesium and sulfur).

Source: Gardening Know How  

What types of plants are you growing indoors and outdoors including house plants? What are there fertilizing needs? What fertilizer best meets this need? Did you know you feed the soil to feed the plant including water? Feeding the soil is essential to keeping your plant healthy and growing as soil nutrients are depleted as they feed this is particularly true for indoor plants that may not be exposed to things like natural rain.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Posted on Leave a comment

African American Farm

Clemmons Family Farm: Ready Set Go!

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
African American Farmers
Source: Clemmons Family Farm
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

How far are the local farms from where you live? Do you know your local farmers? Do you know that some farms allow second gleaning for free? My family and I visited a farm in New England when we lived there and picked apples (second gleaning) at a local orchard in the northern part of Massachusetts. The orchard was about an hour away from where we lived. We purchased some apple cider from the farm and got the apples for free. It made a delicious apple pie. Have you considered visiting your local farmer?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Posted on Leave a comment

The Farmer & His Prince (Charles)

The Farmer and his Prince TRAILER

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
The Farmer and His Prince
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

It is good to know that we are not the only ones on an Organic Journey, Prince Charles has been on his Organic Journey for a longer time and on a larger scale. What do small farmers mean to you? How can you support your community gardens and small farms? You can make a donation to our community garden by clicking here. Why are these gardens, farms and Organic Food Production important to you? Support of Organic efforts is huge to all of us and very appreciated by all of us here as always. Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.