Posted on Leave a comment

Biden’s Latest Executive Orders Are The Most Aggressive Moves On Climate Change Of Any President

The executive orders will take aim at fossil fuels and set the US up to be an international leader in tackling the climate crisis.
Zahra Hirji, BuzzFeed News Reporter
Source: Buzz Feed News
Last updated on January 27, 2021, at 4:23 p.m. ET
Posted on January 27, 2021, at 9:27 a.m. ET

Source: Buzz Feed News
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

President Joe Biden on Wednesday signed sweeping executive orders to force the federal government to plan for and respond to the urgent threat of a warming planet, laying out his historic vision for how the United States can once again become a global climate leader.

The moves will stop new fossil fuel leases on public lands, boost renewable energy development and conservation, as well as create new government offices and interagency groups to prioritize job creation, cleaning up pollution, and environmental justice.

Since taking office last week, Biden and his Cabinet nominees have repeatedly said that tackling the climate crisis is among their top priorities. With these new actions, Biden is detailing how he plans to make that happen by making the federal government central to the response.

“The United States and the world face a profound climate crisis,” the main executive order Biden signed said. “We have a narrow moment to pursue action at home and abroad in order to avoid the most catastrophic impacts of that crisis and to seize the opportunity that tackling climate change presents.”

Biden’s early climate moves stand in stark contrast to former president Donald Trump’s actions, which included immediately deleting climate change from the White House website, thwarting climate action, and using his executive power to boost oil, gas, and coal development.

Biden’s day-one climate actions were a direct response to Trump, including directing his staff to review more than 100 anti-environmental rules enacted by Trump and to start the process for the country to rejoin the Paris climate agreement. But these new actions go far beyond reversing Trump’s actions or even reinstating climate initiatives first championed by former president Barack Obama.

“Today makes clear that President Biden hears our generation’s demands loud and clear, understands the power of our movement, and is serious about using executive power to deliver on his campaign promises,” said Varshini Prakash, executive director of the Sunrise Movement, in a statement.

As part of a broad new executive order, Biden is directing the Department of the Interior to indefinitely pause new oil and gas leases on public lands and offshore waters “to the extent possible.” The order does not specifically ban new coal leases and leaves fossil fuel leases on tribal lands up to their discretion.

Moreover, Biden is directing a review of existing fossil fuel leases and development projects, and asked the Interior Department to find ways to boost renewable energy projects, especially offshore wind, on federally owned water and land.

The American Petroleum Institute, an oil and gas trade association, balked at the new restrictions. “Restricting natural gas and oil leasing and development on federal lands and waters could threaten U.S. energy security, economic growth and good-paying American jobs,” API tweeted.

While the order would not impact the majority of the nation’s oil and gas drilling and coal mining, which takes place on private land, it could still have a major climate impact. The extraction of fossil fuels on public lands between 2005 and 2014 accounted for roughly 25% of the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions during that time, according to a United States Geological Survey report.

A key part of the executive orders is creating new offices and committees focused on addressing specific climate problems and goals. Besides formally creating a new White House Office of Domestic Climate Policy, led by Gina McCarthy, a former head of the Environmental Protection Agency, Biden on Wednesday established a National Climate Task Force that directs members across agencies and departments “to enable a whole-of-government approach to combating the climate crisis,” according to a White House memo.

Biden is also creating a Civilian Climate Corps Initiative designed to create new jobs in conservation, an Interagency Working Group on Coal and Power Plant Communities and Economic Revitalization to take on projects that cut the pollution from existing and abandoned fossil fuel infrastructure, as well as a White House Environmental Justice Interagency Council and White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council to boost environmental justice monitoring and enforcement.

Few details were provided on exactly who will be spearheading the many new efforts, how much funding they will receive, or timelines for delivering on these bold goals.

In most cases, Biden’s actions follow through on his climate campaign promises, such as promising to set aside 30% of public lands and waters to conservation by 2030 and having an international climate summit in his first 100 days — one will be held on Earth Day, April 22, 2021.

“The last four years have been a feeding frenzy on our public lands and waters, and this moratorium is the right way to start our overdue transition to a more sustainable economy,” Rep. Raúl Grijalva, a Democrat from Arizona and chair of the House Committee on Natural Resources. Grijalva last year co-sponsored the Ocean-Based Climate Solutions Act of 2020 that similarly supports the 30% conservation goal. He said now Congress will move forward with the bill.

“The stakes on climate change just simply couldn’t be any higher than they are right now,” John Kerry, Special Presidential Envoy for Climate, said at a press briefing Wednesday.

January 27, 2021, at 10:48 a.m.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

Posted on Leave a comment

19 ACTIVITIES FOR KIDS TO LEARN ABOUT RECYCLING

Posted under Kids & Families by Katie Chiavarone on 
Source: Nature’s Path

Recycling with kids is incredibly important to do, and a good concept to promote as parents and educators. Kids will see that recycling goes beyond simply having a second garbage bin. By repurposing items before throwing them away, kids will learn that making new items from recycled ones takes less energy and fewer resources than making products from brand new materials.

Here are 20 activities that demonstrate the importance of recycling while making it doable and functional for kids:

1. Build a robot.

Don’t throw away the cardboard boxes and yogurt containers! Build a robot with these materials.

2. Make seed paper.

Do this instead of tossing shredded paper in the bin.

3. Play a game. 

Play games to help kids practice which items can be recycled, and which are waste.

4. Make a bird feeder

This is one of those activities that demonstrates how much cheaper it is to use recycled materials than to buy something brand new.

Source: Nature’s Path
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

5. Paint the symbol.

Practice recognizing this symbol through art. This way, kids can easily identify recycling bins out in public.

6. Make recycling bins for the home.

Making small bins that can be kept indoors allows kids the chance to easily sort the garbage.

7. Try an online game.

There are a few online games where kids can practice recycling in a fun way, like this one.

8. Pack a waste-free lunch.

Use a recycled container in lieu of items in bags. More ideas for a waste-free lunch here.

9. Read the facts.

Recycling 1 ton of paper can save 17 trees, 7,000 gallons of water, 2 barrels of oil, and 4,000 kilowatts of electricity. The energy that you save can power 1 home for 5 months.

10. Watch a video.

A short, kid-friendly video can really drive the point home.

11. Go on a recycling scavenger hunt.

Head out to a local park and see how much you can collect from the environment that can be recycled! Got competitive kids? Make it a race.

12. Read! 

Father And Children Reading
Source: Nature’s Path
SHidonna Raven Garden and Cook

13. Make a DIY toy.

Before recycling items, try to repurpose them. A milk jug or a yogurt container can make for really fun ball poppers for kids.

14. Turn newspaper into building rods.

Check out these amazing play structures and tents made from newspaper!

15. Homemade puzzles.

Instead of throwing away greeting cards, cut them up and make a homemade puzzle. Cereal boxes are great for this, as well.

16. Donate toys and clothes.

Instead of throwing away toys your kids are done playing with, help them choose some to be donated and reused by other children.

donating clothes
Source: Nature’s Path
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

17. Take a field trip!

Head out to a local recycling center and watch a bit of the process happen.

18. Spearhead a recycling club.

Help your child start a local initiative in their neighborhood or school.

19. Homemade wind chimes.

String and paint old tin cans to make a nice piece of outdoor musical decor.

There are many other ways to teach kids about recycling and how they can make an impact, but these ones mentioned above certainly make a great start. Kids should feel empowered to contribute to the health of the environment, and can help influence those around them to recycle too!

KATIE CHIAVARONE

What are some other fun ways to teach kids about recycling? What other ways can you get kids involved in recycling? What other ways can you teach kids about sustainable living?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.