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COVID 19 Cases on the Rise: Your States Stats

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Source: Wavy 10 – Norfolk, VA, USA
WASHINGTON (NEXSTAR) — As coronavirus cases in the United States climb towards another peak, new daily cases have reached their highest point yet in 17 states, according to the New York Times.

On Thursday, new confirmed cases climbed over the 65,000 mark — a total the country hasn’t seen since the end of July. Additionally, we’re seeing cases rise in more than 45 states, according to a Times tracking tool.

The U.S. leads the world with 7.9 million coronavirus cases and some 217,000 confirmed deaths. Globally, there have been 39 million reported cases and 1.09 million confirmed deaths.Pfizer coronavirus vaccine won’t be available before Election Day, CEO confirms.

As the nation experiences a 25% increase in confirmed cases, here’s a look at the states that are seeing the highest percentage increases in COVID-19 cases:

States seeing case increases (by percentages):

  • New Mexico – Average of 457 cases per day, an increase of 123 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Vermont – Average of nine cases per day, an increase of 110 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New Hampshire – Average of 78 cases per day, an increase of 101 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Montana – Average of 611 cases per day, an increase of 91 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Connecticut – Average of 326 cases per day, an increase of 80 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Indiana – Average of 1,655 cases per day, an increase of 66 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Wyoming – Average of 183 cases per day, an increase of 65 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Alaska – Average of 193 cases per day, an increase of 64 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Rhode Island – Average of 199 cases per day, an increase of 63 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Arizona – Average of 763 cases per day, an increase of 59 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Colorado – Average of 894 cases per day, an increase of 57 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Michigan – Average of 1,483 cases per day, an increase of 56 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Nebraska – Average of 767 cases per day, an increase of 55 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • North Dakota – Average of 610 cases per day, an increase of 54 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Ohio – Average of 1,654 cases per day, an increase of 53 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • South Dakota – Average of 653 cases per day, an increase of 50 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Mississippi – Average of 760 cases per day, an increase of 49 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Illinois – Average of 3,069 cases per day, an increase of 48 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Virginia – Average of 1,058 cases per day, an increase of 42 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Pennsylvania – Average of 1,362 cases per day, an increase of 39 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Tennessee – Average of 1,870 cases per day, an increase of 38 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Idaho – Average of 660 cases per day, an increase of 37 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • North Carolina – Average of 1,943 cases per day, an increase of 36 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New Jersey – Average of 835 cases per day, an increase of 35 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • West Virginia – Average of 251 cases per day, an increase of 33 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Nevada – Average of 587 cases per day, an increase of 30 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New York – Average of 1,329 cases per day, an increase of 29 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Washington – Average of 659 cases per day, an increase of 29 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Minnesota – Average of 1,312 cases per day, an increase of 28 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Kentucky – Average of 980 cases per day, an increase of 27 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Missouri – Average of 1,916 cases per day, an increase of 27 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Wisconsin – Average of 3,124 cases per day, an increase of 25 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Utah – Average of 1,216 cases per day, an increase of 23 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Alabama – Average of 1,027 cases per day, an increase of 21 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Oregon – Average of 345 cases per day, an increase of 21 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Massachusetts – Average of 663 cases per day, an increase of 20 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Kansas – Average of 788 cases per day, an increase of 19 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Florida – Average of 2,711 cases per day, an increase of 18 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Oklahoma – Average of 1,182 cases per day, an increase of 16 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Georgia – Average of 1,409 cases per day, an increase of 14 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Iowa – Average of 1,044 cases per day, an increase of 13 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • South Carolina – Average of 907 cases per day, an increase of 13 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Arkansas – Average of 911 cases per day, an increase of 11 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Maryland – Average of 589 cases per day, an increase of 11 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Texas – Average of 4,587 cases per day, an increase of 8 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Louisiana – Average of 543 cases per day, an increase of 7 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Delaware – Average of 125 cases per day, an increase of 5 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • California – Average of 3,285 cases per day, an increase of 2 percent from the average two weeks earlier.

States seeing case decreases (by percentages):

  • Hawaii – Average of 89 cases per day, a decrease of 17 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Maine – Average of 28 cases per day, a decrease of 9 percent from the average two weeks earlier.

Just when we think we are coming out of this pandemic and we struggle to get back to normal after the economic crisis that came along with the pandemic, we see many states still struggling with COVID 19 cases Norfolk, VA, USA included. While our cases continue to fluctuate our state is not one of the states that was hit the hardest by COVID 19 cases. We took a cautious and measured approach and it paid dividends. In fact as factors, such as going back to school and mere weather change, now have to be factored in, some of the European countries that were fairing better in the crisis are now seeing new and emerging struggles with COVID 19. COVID 19 has definitely taken its place in history. What solutions have worked well for your state? How are people adjusting to having to spend more times in doors, which has lead to less social distancing, due primarily to weather change and an increase in COVID 19 cases across the globe? What are you winter plans and how do you plan to maintain social distancing measures and keep your immune system strong? Remember, healthy is the New Normal! States such as Hawaii and California may likely fair better than other states like New York and Vermont where citizens will be forced to spend more time indoors in the warmth bracing against the cold winter weather while Hawaii and California can still take advantage of the fresh circulating air outdoors and easier means of social distancing.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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COVID 19 and Venturing Out

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Indeed COVID 19 made the world stand still in many respects. Many states and many countries started opening back up again a few months ago. The United States was among many. Unlike many other ‘developed’ nations the United States remains the leader in COVID 19 cases. We would like to think of ourselves as global leaders, however, this is not quit what was meant by that. Some were eager to re open as closing contributed to the economic hardship of many and caused several businesses large and small to close their doors for good. Nonetheless, venturing out has not been easy as states all over, such as Florida, continue to struggle with spikes in COVID 19 cases. Many states as Governor Northam said, were left to fight a biological war by themselves. Indeed, states were left without a true and clear national COVID 19 plan.

For the most part, we stay home as much as we can. We wear our masks and practice social distancing among other precautions. We have begun to venture out slowly to some of our old routines. In the spirit of good health: the gym is one of them. We first visited our old gym, re toured the facility, and reviewed their COVID 19 health measures. We mapped out our return and exercise plan. After asking a few follow up questions and getting a lay of the ‘new’ land so to speak we started back our old exercise regimen and have begun to work on our physical fitness again: what we believe is one of the 3 pillars of overall health (exercise, health (being disease free) and diet.

Have you begin to venture out? What do you do to stay safe from COVID 19? Will you take the vaccine when it comes out? Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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COVID 19 causes more to start Gardens

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During my recent visit to a local nursery here in Norfolk, VA USA I stuck up a conversation with a staff member. This is not difficult to do when you obviously share common interest. She is a highly knowledgeable gardener with a keen sense of observation. While we started our garden in February, just prior to COVID 19, she stated that people who you would have never seen gardening have begun gardening because of the uncertainty that COVID 19 has struck across the nation and indeed across the world. People have serveral reasons for starting thier own gardens:

  • Promotes social distancing by cutting back on grocery store trips
  • Saves money on ones grocery bill
  • Protects people with underlining conditions from having to go into public
  • Allows people to give food to others
  • Allows people to earn money by selling food to others

If COVID 19 has taught us nothing it has taught us how to be resilient and resourceful and indeed these are all good reasons to start a garden. They were good reasons before COVID 19 and they are better reasons since the pandemic has hit the world. How has the pandemic effected you and your family? How have you coped with the prevailing pandemic? Share your comments with the community by positing here. What have you learned since COVID 19?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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MiMi & Mom

With home schooling and staying close to home we were quickly running out of ideas to keep MiMi occupied. Thank you for inspiring us to get our own growing kit! We also took the bottoms of her Dad’s green onion used for cooking. We are growing the roots in water in hopes to plant them in soil soon. We were surprised to see how FAST it grew in a matter of days. We also are considering a small herb garden in pots to surprise Dad for Father’s Day. Thank you for always sharing and keeping us inspired!

Write your own testimony or comment. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep growing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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How to Celebrate Memorial Day

As COVID 19 lingered on, it left many of us with more questions than answers. Finally we could see the number of deaths begin to slow. While COVID 19 seemed to sweep the world in a matter of weeks brining things to a halt in the United States, we finally began to receive reports that we were effectively slowing the spread of COVID 19. While there is neither vaccine nor cure in sight yet, we could gather some satisfaction from the fact that things were beginning to work in slowing the spread of the virus. As we entered phase one of reopening and things seem to be returning to normal, in the back of our minds we know that things will inevitable not be the same. COVID 19 has caused us to rethink many things. How we work, socialize, shop and celebrate just to name a few. Many of us are sporting hair styles and facial hair that was totally different a few months ago because barber shops and salons are closed to the public.

As things reopen, we wonder what the new normal will be. We believe healthy will be the new normal. While many communities such as the African American and elderly communities got hit the hardest because of pre existing health conditions, many are left grappling with the fact that preexisting health conditions make them susceptible to disease and illness. So, one must reconsider having preexisting conditions at all and rethink how they define healthy. Preexisting health conditions cannot simply be left to linger. If we allow illness to linger, than we are not the fittest and many of them did not survive this pandemic.

Memorial Day is a day to celebrate those who have fallen in the line out duty. It is a time to gather and often eat. Many people have cookouts during this time. With Memorial Day just around the corner many of us are wondering just how to celebrate Memorial Day. The Military is huge in a town home to the largest Naval Base in the United States (Norfolk, Virginia), so is Memorial Day. While we are still in phase one of reopening, gatherings are still limited to just 10 people and we still have to be cognizant of the fact that COVID 19 can remain on surfaces for hours to days.

While we highly recommend following all the recommended and enforced guidelines, we recently had a cook out without any issue. Our gathering was about seven people and we were highly organized and clean when we cooked out. So, we believe that you can still celebrate Memorial Day with a traditional cookout but just on a small or smaller scale. You might have to forgo any traditions of fireworks or events with large gatherings as they are still being discouraged.

COVID 19 has caused many people to rethink how they stay connected and socialize with many people making use of software such as zoom and Google hangout. What are ways that you can celebrate and acknowledge Memorial Day here with us? What is your favorite salad recipe? Submit it via a comment or email it to us. Share your recipe with the community. How can you make your favorite recipes organic recipes? Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep growing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Corona: Healthy is the New Normal

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As a state official stated, Corona brought everything to a screeching halt with in a matter of weeks. Having spent the last several weeks at home and some not able to work, many people are eager to see things get back to normal and to get back to work. Social distancing has heighten the importance of our connection to those people we consider friends and family as well as those we associate with on nearly a daily basis. All of us across the globe have suffered similar issues together. Loved ones on the front lines and those lost alone in hospitals to die without a final proper burial. No single event in modern history has been more galvanizing than Corona. As many of us are eager to get back to normal, we are revealed to see things opening back up slowly but surely. We are reminded and cautioned by leaders such as Governor Northam and T.D. Jakes that Corona is still indeed with us. We have simply slowed the spread of it. So as we begin to venture back out into our communities and return to work, we must be reminded that Corona is without a cure and remains in our midst.

Some of the hardest hit communities have been the elderly, African American and Hispanic communities. The CDC (Center for Disease Control) stated that 30 % of the African American population are Corona patients while they make up only 13% of the US population. There are many factors that contribute to these numbers. Population density is one. That can include a densely populated home or an urban environment that tends to be densely populated. Lack of paid sick leave and insurance is another factor the CDC is saying contributes to these numbers. Preexisting health conditions or concerns is another contributing factor and is why we write to you today. While we are passionate about gardening and cooking, it is because doing these things properly can lead to good health. With Corona in our midst and a matter of good practice, being healthy has become the new normal. Get hit hard by a pandemic and you will begin to refocus your health goals and what is important in life. As we can see from the CDC statistics being in good health is one way to combat Corona.

Stay Masked Up
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  • Do an honest assessment of your current state of health
  • Do everything possible to be as healthy as possible that includes eating right (a diet appropriate to your specific needs)
  • Stay informed and follow the guidelines of each re opening phase
  • If you do not know where to get correct information, start with the CDC

This gives us pause to think critically about the social economical issues that minority populations face daily. The CDC numbers are alarming and illuminating to social economic issues which can neither be ignored nor accepted. How has Corona impacted you and your loved ones? What will you do differently since Corona? What re 3 things you will do today to improve your health? What questions do you have about the foods you consume daily? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. You are at the center of our thoughts and prayers.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.