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Some Black and Latino Americans are still hesitant to take the vaccine. Here’s what is fueling that distrust

By Nicquel Terry Ellis and Jason Carroll, CNN
Updated 10:51 PM ET, Fri December 4, 2020
Source: CNN

(CNN)When a Covid-19 vaccine becomes widely available to Americans, Joe Cunningham says he won’t be taking it.”I don’t know, I don’t understand it,” the 85-year-old said. “I’d like to know where it’s coming from.”Cunningham, who lives in Hobson City, AL, is among the Black Americans who have little faith in doctors and Covid-19 vaccines recently developed by pharmaceutical companies.Alabama is taking a beating from the coronavirus, with the state’s 14-day positivity rate just over 29%. In Calhoun County, where Hobson City sits, the rate is 37%.Still, older residents like Cunningham won’t even take a Covid-19 test.The town, located about 100 miles from Tuskegee, is home to one of the darkest chapters in American medical history.America’s history of racism in medical research and a lack of trust in the federal government is making some Black Americans and Latinos hesitant to take the vaccine.Health and community leaders fear that vaccine hesitancy could result in some Black and Latino Americans not being vaccinated as Covid-19 continues to batter their communities at disproportionate rates.On Monday, Moderna announced that it was applying to the US Food and Drug Administration for emergency use authorization of its Covid-19 vaccine that it says is 94.5% effective against the virus. Pfizer applied on Nov. 20 and says its vaccine is 95% effective in preventing infections.But a study released by the COVID Collaborative, the NAACP and UnidosUS found that only 14% of Black Americans trust that a vaccine will be safe and 18% trust it will be effective.Latino Americans, however, were more optimistic with 34% saying they trust the vaccine will be safe and 40% believing it will be effective.Much of their hesitancy stems from distrust in the federal government and the nation’s history of racism in medical research and healthcare, the study found.Carlton Gordon also says he won’t immediately take the vaccine.Gordon, a Black father who lives outside of Chicago, says he is concerned the vaccine is being rushed to the market and that not enough Black people have been tested to know if it’s safe.

Pictured is Carlton Gordon, of Chicago, with his wife and children.

Pictured is Carlton Gordon, of Chicago, with his wife and children.”I would rather not try to pivot toward a vaccine that frankly is not quite proven,” said Gordon, 34. “If this vaccine is proven effective after it’s been released more broadly to people, then we can certainly value it and I might change my perspective.”Building trust around the vaccine will require a concerted effort by Black and Latino doctors, researchers, activists and elected officials, said Renee Mahaffey Harris, president and CEO of the Center for Closing the Health Gap in Cincinnati.People of color, she said, are more likely to trust leaders who look like them rather than officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the FDA.Communities should start planning information campaigns and town halls to discuss how and why the vaccine works, Harris said.”It must be a Black person talking to a Black person,” Harris said. “You’re not going to all of a sudden trust a group of people that you have mistrusted just because the science says this.”

A fear of being ‘guinea pigs’

Ernest Grant, the president of the American Nurses Association, participated in a vaccine trial this fall with hopes that it would combat fears in the Black community around taking the vaccine.Grant, who is Black, said he took the two required doses of the vaccine — the first Sept. 9 and the second Oct. 5 — and experienced mild side effects such as fatigue and chills.Although the trial is double-blinded, meaning researchers and participants don’t know who is actually getting the real vaccine or the placebo, Grant said he is confident the vaccine is safe. He recommends other Black leaders take the vaccine so they can share their experience and knowledge with the community.”I feel confident that once it is released to the public there should not be hesitancy about taking the vaccine,” Grant said. “At some point there’s always that potential that it (Covid-19) could happen to you and if I know there is a cure that could potentially save me from that, I think I would go for the cure.”Yet, it’s still difficult for some Black people to trust because of racial bias from healthcare providers.Carmen Bailey, of Cleveland, OH, said she was diagnosed with Covid-19 in April and has avoided medical help because doctors have treated her poorly in the past.Bailey, who still suffers Covid-19 side effects with her heart, lungs and kidneys, said she refuses to take the vaccine.”We don’t know the side effects,” said Bailey, 52. “I just really feel like at this point … people that’s going to take that vaccine are guinea pigs.”History has left a dark cloud for some Black people.The Tuskegee experiments from 1932-1972, recruited 600 Black men — 399 who had syphilis and 201 who did not — and tracked the disease’s progression by not treating the men as they died or suffered severe health issues.Black people who were enslaved were also historically used by doctors to test medications and surgeries that caused health complications or death.The racist history in medical research prevented pharmaceutical companies from recruiting enough people of color earlier this year for vaccine trials, said Dr. Nelson Michael, a coordinator for Operation Warp Speed, an effort led by the government to develop a Covid-19 vaccine.Nearly 40% of reported Covid-19 cases have been Black and Latino people, according to the CDC.However, Moderna reported 10% of its vaccine trial participants were Black and 20% were Latino. Pfizer reported 10% were Black and 13% were Latino.

CNN en Español's Dr. Elmer Huerta volunteered for a coronavirus vaccine trial. Here's why

CNN en Español’s Dr. Elmer Huerta volunteered for a coronavirus vaccine trial. Here’s whyStill, Black physicians have rallied around the vaccine in recent weeks.Last month, the Black Coalition Against COVID published a “Love Letter to Back America” signed by eight prominent Black doctors that encouraged Black people to participate in the vaccine trials and take the vaccine once it is proven safe.”We know that our collective role in helping to create a vaccine that works for Black people—and that we trust — has an impact on our very survival,” the doctors wrote.Black pastors have also united to share information about the vaccine.Rev. Horace Sheffield of Detroit said he joined six leading pastors — including Rev. Al Sharpton and Rev. Raphael Warnock — from churches across the country to launch Choose Healthy Life, an initiative that aims to combat the pandemic’s impact on the Black community.Sheffield said he is willing to be one of the first Black people to take the vaccine when it’s released.”We’ve got a great job to do to convince people to take the vaccine,” Sheffield said. “And the only people who can carry that message is us (Black leaders).”Black leaders in New York, including Sharpton, launched a task force this week to address Covid-19 vaccine delivery to the Black community and concerns about the vaccine’s safety.

Rev. Horace Sheffield (far right) of Detroit and volunteers offered COVID-19 testing to the community this year.

Rev. Horace Sheffield (far right) of Detroit and volunteers offered COVID-19 testing to the community this year.In the Latino community, many won’t take the vaccine because of their distrust in the federal government, activists say.President Donald Trump’s administration’s anti-immigration policies, public charge rules that create barriers to citizenship and threats to the Affordable Care Act have made some Latino families reluctant to receive healthcare, said Rita Carreon, vice president of the health for UnidosUS, a nonpartisan group that advocates for Latinos.

Lack of access is the other half of the battle

Carreon said Latino Americans will be looking to their trusted leaders and organizations for information on vaccine trial data, side effects, and where they can safely get the vaccine in their neighborhood if they are uninsured.”Historically, there has not been significant outreach in the community to help them feel confident in the healthcare system,” Carreon said. “We want to make sure information is communicated in plain, simple, and clear terms.”But gaining the confidence of Black and Latino Americans is half the battle.Many people of color living in poor and urban neighborhoods don’t have doctors or healthcare facilities near their homes. They also lack transportation.CDC advisers voted this week to recommend that health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities get the Covid-19 vaccine first. If the Modern and Pfizer vaccines are approved, the federal government estimates that 40 million of doses could be available by the end of December.Existing clinics in urban centers such as Chicago and Atlanta worry they won’t have the resources to reach every patient once the vaccine is rolled out to the general public.Earlier this year, some ran out of personal protective equipment and Covid-19 tests.CommunityHealth in Chicago, which provides free healthcare to nearly 8,000 patients — most of them Latino — is understaffed with only 42 employees and 1,000 volunteers, CEO Stephanie Willding said.Willding said her clinic isn’t equipped for the community outreach, vaccine storage and other logistics needed to get two doses of the vaccine to every patient.She also worries that her patients, particularly single parents and essential workers, won’t be able to get their families to the clinic twice.”Covid-19 has put a spotlight on something that safety net healthcare providers have always known and that is the inequity in healthcare access,” Willding said. “When we talk about an equitable approach to vaccine distribution, free and charitable health centers need to be factored into that approach.”Breanna Lathrop, who heads Good Samaritan Health Center in Atlanta, is in the same boat.Lathrop said she needs funding for syringes and needles. She also needs help convincing patients that the vaccine is safe and necessary.”I think people are going into this already feeling a little scared and overwhelmed,” Lathrop said. “We talk about their questions and we want them to feel comfortable. But when you’re talking about suddenly vaccinating hundreds of people, I can’t sit with hundreds of people and have that conversation.”

CNN’s Laura Dolan, Elizabeth Cohen and Maggie Fox contributed to this report.

What are your thoughts on this article? What are your thoughts on the pandemic and the COVID vaccine? Why?

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Whole families in quarantine: Virginia officials wait to see impact of Thanksgiving on the coronavirus’ spreadcorona, corona virus, covid, covid 19, covid cases rise, covid vaccine, dr facui, health, health industry, holidays, medical, pandemic, shidonna raven, shidonna raven garden and cook, social distancing, traveling

Midrenne Sampson, radiology technologist with Velocity Urgent Care in Virginia Beach, processes an antigen test Thursday, October 29, 2020, morning.
Midrenne Sampson, radiology technologist with Velocity Urgent Care in Virginia Beach, processes an antigen test Thursday, October 29, 2020, morning. (Stephen M. Katz/The Virginian-Pilot)

Source: The Virginia Pilot

It may take two to three weeks to know whether Gov. Ralph Northam’s pandemic restrictions imposed before the holiday are working to stem Virginia’s rise in cases.

At a news conference Wednesday, Northam said local health departments already are getting troubling signs: For instance, reports that whole families in Mount Rogers Health District, which includes Bristol, Galax and neighboring Southwest Virginia counties, are quarantining after exposure at Thanksgiving gatherings, he said.

The governor, usually delicate with words, used a somewhat firmer tone to deliver his message.

“Virginia, you know the truth,” he said. “If you don’t wear a mask, and you don’t social distance, and you think your right to ignore public health advice trumps your neighbor’s right to not get infected by you, these cases will just continue to go up. It’s just selfish.”

Public health officials say it will take time to know the impact of Thanksgiving.

During the holiday, there was a sharp drop off in the number of COVID-19 nasal swab tests reported. Testing in Virginia peaked Nov. 18, at just over 34,000 a day, then plunged below 20,000 in the days following Thanksgiving, according to an analysis by The University of Virginia Biocomplexity Institute. The center is partnering with the Virginia Department of Health to offer data-based COVID-19 projections.

This may be due to fewer people seeking tests and typical testing sites being closed, causing a lag in detection. The drop is probably short-lived, analysts said, because positive test results continued to rise.

About 9.5% of standard tests for the coronavirus came back positive over the past week in Virginia, a steep climb from 7.3%.

And Virginia reported 3,793 new cases of the coronavirus Saturday morning, the largest single-day increase since the start of the pandemic. Public health officials said the large caseload was partially due to a data entry backlog.

Shortly before Thanksgiving, Northam put in place new restrictions to curb new cases. He capped public and private gathering sizes at 25 people, down from 250, and forced earlier restaurant serving times and closures. Children ages 5 and up are now required to wear masks.

If indeed Virginia experiences a jump in case growth, the state could see a peak of 77,000 cases a week by mid-February, according to the UVA report.

But health experts caution these predictions are always changing with new information, and slight differences in people’s behavior can alter the course of the pandemic, not to mention the imminent arrival of a COVID-19 vaccine. If Virginians wear masks, keep a distance of at least 6 feet from other people who aren’t part of their household and wash hands, cases could peak early this month, at just under 27,000 cases per week.

As of Friday, there had been a total of 217,588 confirmed cases statewide and 4,160 suspected deaths. About 3.4 million tests have been given statewide.

The United States’ case tally rose to 14.2 million last week with about 277,000 deaths, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. There have been 65.4 million cases, and 1.5 million have died worldwide.

The statewide weekly incidence of the virus was 28 out of 100,000 people, Virginia public health officials said. But it continues to be much lower than the national incidence of 53, which has slowed a little over the past two weeks.

The incidence rate is the frequency that a new illness occurs in a community over a period of time. That’s not to be confused with a measure of prevalence, the proportion of people who have an illness in a set time frame, regardless of when they first developed the infection.

In Hampton Roads, 11 people died last week, nearly double the previous week’s total. Of those fatalities, three each occurred in Norfolk and Virginia Beach, and two were in Gloucester County. Chesapeake, Franklin and Hampton each had one.

While the Eastern region is faring better than the western reaches of the state, trends in general are worsening. As of Friday, emergency room visits for coronavirus-like symptoms had been growing for over a month, and intensive care unit hospitalizations had been increasing for the past three weeks, according to health department data.

During the past week, Virginia Beach’s case counts continued to be high, with another 791 confirmed positive. The tally was consistent with the prior week’s 811, according to the state health department. The next highest totals were found in Chesapeake, with 456, and Norfolk, with 320.

Case counts are expected to be higher in bigger cities, but for some, caseloads are also high relative to their population sizes. Virginia Beach and Chesapeake each had top rates for the region, with 25.1 and 26.8 per 100,000 people, respectively.

But Gloucester County far surpassed both cities and all other localities in Hampton Roads with its rate of 40.9 per 100,000 people. The county reported 107 new cases in the past week.

Dr. Richard Williams, director of the Three Rivers Health District, confirmed that the upsurge in Gloucester is linked to a recent outbreak at a long-term care facility. Some 40 cases and two deaths are tied to the incident, he said.

“You’re always two beats behind the virus in these settings,” he said. “But you try to protect as many people as you can.”

Williams said Gloucester has a host of testing sites, so it’s likely the district is capturing a lot of data because of that. Residents who live there also tend to work in Richmond and South Hampton Roads, and as transmission rates increase in dense areas, it’s not surprising to see a locality like Gloucester feel the ripple effects.

He also suspected Thanksgiving cases are starting to creep in.

“It can’t be emphasized enough that we’re entering a time when we could very easily have a compromised health care system,” he said, referring to the possibility of overloaded hospitals.

When intensive care units begin to fill with coronavirus patients, he said, it leaves fewer beds and resources available for everyday health emergencies, such as heart attacks and strokes.

“It really potentiates the lethal effect of COVID-19,” Williams said.

Here’s a look at the pandemic around the region:

Chesapeake’s seven-day daily case average was 65 on Friday, a 23% drop from 84 a week ago.

Norfolk’s daily case average was 46, up from 38 a week ago.

Virginia Beach’s daily case average was 113, fairly flat with 116 a week ago.

Newport News reported 261 new cases for the week, with a daily case average of 37, up from 33 a week ago.

Portsmouth reported 86 new cases for the week, with a daily case average of 12, down from 17 a week ago.

Hampton reported 155 new cases for the week, with a daily case average of 22, down more than 30% from 32 a week ago.

James City County reported 76 new cases for the week, with a daily case average of 11, flat with the rate last week.

York County reported 91 new cases for the week, with a daily case average of 13, up from 10 a week ago.

Suffolk reported 121 new cases for the week, with a daily case average of 17, down from 19 a week ago.

Newport News, Portsmouth, Suffolk and Williamsburg and Accomack, Isle of Wight, James City, Mathews, Middlesex, York and Poquoson counties reported no deaths.

For other pandemic data, go to www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus.

Elisha Sauers, elisha.sauers@pilotonline.com, 757-222-3864

Where are you located? How are the cases where you live? Are you social distancing and wearing masks? Why? Why not?

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COVID 19 and the Holidays

Fauci: ‘Considerable risk of another surge’ before holidays, advises against unnecessary travel

Source: 13 News Now

Did Thanksgiving cause a surge in COVID-19 cases? What should Americans look at ahead of future holiday travel? We talked to the nation’s top expert, Dr. Fauci.

WASHINGTON — The holiday season is still in swing, with more and more states doubling down on lockdown measures as coronavirus cases surge across the country.

With more and more people looking to travel to visit families, or already traveling and hosting gatherings for Thanksgiving, confusion over what’s allowed and what upcoming restrictions are have been rampant. 

To help clarify guidance and get you the answers you want to know, our Verify team talked to one expert who has a lot of experience: the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci.

“I think there is a considerable risk that a couple to three weeks from now, we might start seeing yet again, another surge,” Fauci told WUSA9.

From holiday travel repercussions to potential increases in state restrictions before Christmas, here’s a look at what Dr. Fauci said.

What will Thanksgiving mean for hospitalizations and deaths related to COVID in the coming weeks?

It’s impossible to know the ins and outs of every family’s safety measures for the country, Fauci said, making it difficult to give ballpark estimates or specifics on predicting what the numbers could look like as a result from recent Thanksgiving travel.

“We can’t do anything about the travel that has already occurred and that’s occurring now as people are returning from the Thanksgiving holiday,” he told WUSA9. “Having said all of that, I think we have to at least expect the likelihood that we will see a blip or a bit of a surge superimposed upon the current surge that antedated the Thanksgiving holiday, but we hope it is not substantial.”

Source: 13 News Now
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Fauci continued, saying that a post-holiday surge is not unlikely — in fact, it’s reasonable.

“I’m afraid that there’s a reasonable chance, given the volume of travel that we’ve seen reported on TV and other media, and the millions of people at airports and train stations, that I think there is a considerable risk that in two, three weeks from now, we might start seeing yet again, another surge because what was happening in some states,” he said, adding that he hopes to see states that were on the decline to continue that trend.

 “I’m afraid it may, you know, go back up again,” he said. “We’ll just have to wait and see.”

What should I do before traveling in December?


First and foremost, try and contain and limit your travel as much as possible, Fauci says. 

“I know, particularly when you’re in a situation where you’re approaching another big holiday season, that before you start making plans that you would have to cancel, think seriously,” he said, adding the importance of creating a risk-benefit determination to see the extent of who you would be endangering and the safety measures you are taking.

“So just think about it, that we really need to say we are in an extraordinarily unique time, I mean, it is unprecedented in the last hundred and two years,” he continued. “But here’s what we’re going through —  it’s real. The numbers don’t lie. You see, we’ve broken records of hospitalizations, we have over 266,000 deaths and over 13 million infections. Those are real numbers and real people, we’ve got to see as best as we possibly can to blunt that.”

What if I traveled during Thanksgiving? What do I need to do now?

Again, it’s hard to determine each person’s exposure, but for the most part, Fauci said people should continue getting tested and taking preventative measures to reduce future exposure. 

“It depends upon the circumstances that they were in, in the circumstances in which they are coming in,” Fauci said. “If someone is coming back from travel, I don’t think we need to say that everyone needs to be quarantined for a period or even tested. But for example, if someone is coming back into a situation, where they will expose themselves to persons who are in a category of high-risk, you want to get tested. And you might want to come back, quarantine yourself for a few days, get tested and figure out that you’re okay, at least for now. But I don’t think every single person needs to do that.”

Does Fauci think states will need harsher restrictions ahead of Christmas?

The answer to that question will vary depending on the state, Fauci said.  

“I had a couple of calls from health authorities in different states, trying to bounce off me my opinion of whether or not they should Institute harsher restrictions like selected types of lockdowns,” Fauci said. “Not countrywide lockdowns, but saying for a particular city, or a particular town, in which it’s clear they’re overrunning their health system, maybe the only thing you could do is a temporary two or three-week shutdown to try and relieve the burden.”

Fauci was very clear that mandated shutdowns are not something he wants to universally recommend

“One of the things you got to be careful about when you’re dealing with as large a country as the United States, with so many states, so many cities, so many towns, is that you want to be careful about making blanket strong recommendations,” he said. “States and cities should at least consider that [temporary lockdowns] if it looks like everything they’ve said everything they’ve tried, has not worked and they are on the brink of being overrun. If that is the case, then they should seriously consider some more stringent recommendations.”


Dr. Anthony Fauci has served as head director for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases since 1984, and has advised six presidents on a wide range of domestic and global health issues.

How did you spend Thanksgiving? How will you spend Christmas and the New Year? What COVID 19 precautions will you take? What are your thoughts on Fauci’s advisory?

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Gov. Northam announces new statewide COVID-19 restrictions as cases surge

covid 19 shidonna raven garden and cook

Source: 13 News Now
RICHMOND, Va. — Gov. Ralph Northam reinstated new COVID-19 restrictions statewide Friday.

The restrictions come as Virginia is seeing an increase in virus cases, especially in the southwest region of the state.

The new restrictions include:

  • Reduction in public and private social gatherings (indoor and outdoor) from 250 to 25.
  • The mask mandate will now include ages 5 and up. (It was previously ages 10 and up.)
  • Essential retail such as grocery stores and pharmacies will now have an enforceable penalty through the Virginia Department of Health. It will be a class 1 misdemeanor. (The penalty was previously only applied to non-essential retail.)
  • Alcohol sales must stop at 10 p.m. and bars and restaurants must close by midnight.

The restrictions will go into effect at 12:01 a.m. Monday, Nov. 16. 

The 25-person cap applies only to public and private social gatherings. It doesn’t apply to employment or instructional education settings (schools).

“COVID-19 is surging across the country, and while cases are not rising in Virginia as rapidly as in some other states, I do not intend to wait until they are. We are acting now to prevent this health crisis from getting worse,” Northam said in a release.

At a briefing on Tuesday, Northam said cases were trending in the wrong direction, especially in Southwestern Virginia, where percent positivity was about 9 percent. The rest of the state was slightly above 6 percent.

Northam said cases have been rising for about a month. A few weeks ago, Virginia’s positivity rate was about 5 percent.

“We are one state – one Commonwealth – and no region is an island,” Northam said at the briefing. 

“We all need to step up our vigilance and our precautions, especially as we head towards the Thanksgiving holiday.”

Virginia Beach, Norfolk and Hampton have seen slight upticks in cases. Virginia Beach reported 100 cases on Thursday.

At the onset of the pandemic masks were scare. Today masks appear to have become an extension of our wardrobe. Masks are one way to help prevent the spread of COVID. Social distancing is another means of preventing the spread. What measures do you take to prevent the spread of COVID 19? How have things changed for you and yours since the pandemic?

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COVID 19 Cases on the Rise: Your States Stats

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Source: Wavy 10 – Norfolk, VA, USA
WASHINGTON (NEXSTAR) — As coronavirus cases in the United States climb towards another peak, new daily cases have reached their highest point yet in 17 states, according to the New York Times.

On Thursday, new confirmed cases climbed over the 65,000 mark — a total the country hasn’t seen since the end of July. Additionally, we’re seeing cases rise in more than 45 states, according to a Times tracking tool.

The U.S. leads the world with 7.9 million coronavirus cases and some 217,000 confirmed deaths. Globally, there have been 39 million reported cases and 1.09 million confirmed deaths.Pfizer coronavirus vaccine won’t be available before Election Day, CEO confirms.

As the nation experiences a 25% increase in confirmed cases, here’s a look at the states that are seeing the highest percentage increases in COVID-19 cases:

States seeing case increases (by percentages):

  • New Mexico – Average of 457 cases per day, an increase of 123 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Vermont – Average of nine cases per day, an increase of 110 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New Hampshire – Average of 78 cases per day, an increase of 101 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Montana – Average of 611 cases per day, an increase of 91 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Connecticut – Average of 326 cases per day, an increase of 80 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Indiana – Average of 1,655 cases per day, an increase of 66 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Wyoming – Average of 183 cases per day, an increase of 65 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Alaska – Average of 193 cases per day, an increase of 64 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Rhode Island – Average of 199 cases per day, an increase of 63 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Arizona – Average of 763 cases per day, an increase of 59 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Colorado – Average of 894 cases per day, an increase of 57 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Michigan – Average of 1,483 cases per day, an increase of 56 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Nebraska – Average of 767 cases per day, an increase of 55 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • North Dakota – Average of 610 cases per day, an increase of 54 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Ohio – Average of 1,654 cases per day, an increase of 53 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • South Dakota – Average of 653 cases per day, an increase of 50 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Mississippi – Average of 760 cases per day, an increase of 49 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Illinois – Average of 3,069 cases per day, an increase of 48 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Virginia – Average of 1,058 cases per day, an increase of 42 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Pennsylvania – Average of 1,362 cases per day, an increase of 39 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Tennessee – Average of 1,870 cases per day, an increase of 38 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Idaho – Average of 660 cases per day, an increase of 37 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • North Carolina – Average of 1,943 cases per day, an increase of 36 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New Jersey – Average of 835 cases per day, an increase of 35 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • West Virginia – Average of 251 cases per day, an increase of 33 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Nevada – Average of 587 cases per day, an increase of 30 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New York – Average of 1,329 cases per day, an increase of 29 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Washington – Average of 659 cases per day, an increase of 29 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Minnesota – Average of 1,312 cases per day, an increase of 28 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Kentucky – Average of 980 cases per day, an increase of 27 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Missouri – Average of 1,916 cases per day, an increase of 27 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Wisconsin – Average of 3,124 cases per day, an increase of 25 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Utah – Average of 1,216 cases per day, an increase of 23 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Alabama – Average of 1,027 cases per day, an increase of 21 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Oregon – Average of 345 cases per day, an increase of 21 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Massachusetts – Average of 663 cases per day, an increase of 20 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Kansas – Average of 788 cases per day, an increase of 19 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Florida – Average of 2,711 cases per day, an increase of 18 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Oklahoma – Average of 1,182 cases per day, an increase of 16 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Georgia – Average of 1,409 cases per day, an increase of 14 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Iowa – Average of 1,044 cases per day, an increase of 13 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • South Carolina – Average of 907 cases per day, an increase of 13 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Arkansas – Average of 911 cases per day, an increase of 11 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Maryland – Average of 589 cases per day, an increase of 11 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Texas – Average of 4,587 cases per day, an increase of 8 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Louisiana – Average of 543 cases per day, an increase of 7 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Delaware – Average of 125 cases per day, an increase of 5 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • California – Average of 3,285 cases per day, an increase of 2 percent from the average two weeks earlier.

States seeing case decreases (by percentages):

  • Hawaii – Average of 89 cases per day, a decrease of 17 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Maine – Average of 28 cases per day, a decrease of 9 percent from the average two weeks earlier.

Just when we think we are coming out of this pandemic and we struggle to get back to normal after the economic crisis that came along with the pandemic, we see many states still struggling with COVID 19 cases Norfolk, VA, USA included. While our cases continue to fluctuate our state is not one of the states that was hit the hardest by COVID 19 cases. We took a cautious and measured approach and it paid dividends. In fact as factors, such as going back to school and mere weather change, now have to be factored in, some of the European countries that were fairing better in the crisis are now seeing new and emerging struggles with COVID 19. COVID 19 has definitely taken its place in history. What solutions have worked well for your state? How are people adjusting to having to spend more times in doors, which has lead to less social distancing, due primarily to weather change and an increase in COVID 19 cases across the globe? What are you winter plans and how do you plan to maintain social distancing measures and keep your immune system strong? Remember, healthy is the New Normal! States such as Hawaii and California may likely fair better than other states like New York and Vermont where citizens will be forced to spend more time indoors in the warmth bracing against the cold winter weather while Hawaii and California can still take advantage of the fresh circulating air outdoors and easier means of social distancing.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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COVID 19 and Venturing Out

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Indeed COVID 19 made the world stand still in many respects. Many states and many countries started opening back up again a few months ago. The United States was among many. Unlike many other ‘developed’ nations the United States remains the leader in COVID 19 cases. We would like to think of ourselves as global leaders, however, this is not quit what was meant by that. Some were eager to re open as closing contributed to the economic hardship of many and caused several businesses large and small to close their doors for good. Nonetheless, venturing out has not been easy as states all over, such as Florida, continue to struggle with spikes in COVID 19 cases. Many states as Governor Northam said, were left to fight a biological war by themselves. Indeed, states were left without a true and clear national COVID 19 plan.

For the most part, we stay home as much as we can. We wear our masks and practice social distancing among other precautions. We have begun to venture out slowly to some of our old routines. In the spirit of good health: the gym is one of them. We first visited our old gym, re toured the facility, and reviewed their COVID 19 health measures. We mapped out our return and exercise plan. After asking a few follow up questions and getting a lay of the ‘new’ land so to speak we started back our old exercise regimen and have begun to work on our physical fitness again: what we believe is one of the 3 pillars of overall health (exercise, health (being disease free) and diet.

Have you begin to venture out? What do you do to stay safe from COVID 19? Will you take the vaccine when it comes out? Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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COVID 19 causes more to start Gardens

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During my recent visit to a local nursery here in Norfolk, VA USA I stuck up a conversation with a staff member. This is not difficult to do when you obviously share common interest. She is a highly knowledgeable gardener with a keen sense of observation. While we started our garden in February, just prior to COVID 19, she stated that people who you would have never seen gardening have begun gardening because of the uncertainty that COVID 19 has struck across the nation and indeed across the world. People have serveral reasons for starting thier own gardens:

  • Promotes social distancing by cutting back on grocery store trips
  • Saves money on ones grocery bill
  • Protects people with underlining conditions from having to go into public
  • Allows people to give food to others
  • Allows people to earn money by selling food to others

If COVID 19 has taught us nothing it has taught us how to be resilient and resourceful and indeed these are all good reasons to start a garden. They were good reasons before COVID 19 and they are better reasons since the pandemic has hit the world. How has the pandemic effected you and your family? How have you coped with the prevailing pandemic? Share your comments with the community by positing here. What have you learned since COVID 19?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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MiMi & Mom

With home schooling and staying close to home we were quickly running out of ideas to keep MiMi occupied. Thank you for inspiring us to get our own growing kit! We also took the bottoms of her Dad’s green onion used for cooking. We are growing the roots in water in hopes to plant them in soil soon. We were surprised to see how FAST it grew in a matter of days. We also are considering a small herb garden in pots to surprise Dad for Father’s Day. Thank you for always sharing and keeping us inspired!

Write your own testimony or comment. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep growing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Flower Grow Kit
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

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How to Celebrate Memorial Day

As COVID 19 lingered on, it left many of us with more questions than answers. Finally we could see the number of deaths begin to slow. While COVID 19 seemed to sweep the world in a matter of weeks brining things to a halt in the United States, we finally began to receive reports that we were effectively slowing the spread of COVID 19. While there is neither vaccine nor cure in sight yet, we could gather some satisfaction from the fact that things were beginning to work in slowing the spread of the virus. As we entered phase one of reopening and things seem to be returning to normal, in the back of our minds we know that things will inevitable not be the same. COVID 19 has caused us to rethink many things. How we work, socialize, shop and celebrate just to name a few. Many of us are sporting hair styles and facial hair that was totally different a few months ago because barber shops and salons are closed to the public.

As things reopen, we wonder what the new normal will be. We believe healthy will be the new normal. While many communities such as the African American and elderly communities got hit the hardest because of pre existing health conditions, many are left grappling with the fact that preexisting health conditions make them susceptible to disease and illness. So, one must reconsider having preexisting conditions at all and rethink how they define healthy. Preexisting health conditions cannot simply be left to linger. If we allow illness to linger, than we are not the fittest and many of them did not survive this pandemic.

Memorial Day is a day to celebrate those who have fallen in the line out duty. It is a time to gather and often eat. Many people have cookouts during this time. With Memorial Day just around the corner many of us are wondering just how to celebrate Memorial Day. The Military is huge in a town home to the largest Naval Base in the United States (Norfolk, Virginia), so is Memorial Day. While we are still in phase one of reopening, gatherings are still limited to just 10 people and we still have to be cognizant of the fact that COVID 19 can remain on surfaces for hours to days.

While we highly recommend following all the recommended and enforced guidelines, we recently had a cook out without any issue. Our gathering was about seven people and we were highly organized and clean when we cooked out. So, we believe that you can still celebrate Memorial Day with a traditional cookout but just on a small or smaller scale. You might have to forgo any traditions of fireworks or events with large gatherings as they are still being discouraged.

COVID 19 has caused many people to rethink how they stay connected and socialize with many people making use of software such as zoom and Google hangout. What are ways that you can celebrate and acknowledge Memorial Day here with us? What is your favorite salad recipe? Submit it via a comment or email it to us. Share your recipe with the community. How can you make your favorite recipes organic recipes? Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep growing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Corona: Healthy is the New Normal

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As a state official stated, Corona brought everything to a screeching halt with in a matter of weeks. Having spent the last several weeks at home and some not able to work, many people are eager to see things get back to normal and to get back to work. Social distancing has heighten the importance of our connection to those people we consider friends and family as well as those we associate with on nearly a daily basis. All of us across the globe have suffered similar issues together. Loved ones on the front lines and those lost alone in hospitals to die without a final proper burial. No single event in modern history has been more galvanizing than Corona. As many of us are eager to get back to normal, we are revealed to see things opening back up slowly but surely. We are reminded and cautioned by leaders such as Governor Northam and T.D. Jakes that Corona is still indeed with us. We have simply slowed the spread of it. So as we begin to venture back out into our communities and return to work, we must be reminded that Corona is without a cure and remains in our midst.

Some of the hardest hit communities have been the elderly, African American and Hispanic communities. The CDC (Center for Disease Control) stated that 30 % of the African American population are Corona patients while they make up only 13% of the US population. There are many factors that contribute to these numbers. Population density is one. That can include a densely populated home or an urban environment that tends to be densely populated. Lack of paid sick leave and insurance is another factor the CDC is saying contributes to these numbers. Preexisting health conditions or concerns is another contributing factor and is why we write to you today. While we are passionate about gardening and cooking, it is because doing these things properly can lead to good health. With Corona in our midst and a matter of good practice, being healthy has become the new normal. Get hit hard by a pandemic and you will begin to refocus your health goals and what is important in life. As we can see from the CDC statistics being in good health is one way to combat Corona.

Stay Masked Up
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
  • Do an honest assessment of your current state of health
  • Do everything possible to be as healthy as possible that includes eating right (a diet appropriate to your specific needs)
  • Stay informed and follow the guidelines of each re opening phase
  • If you do not know where to get correct information, start with the CDC

This gives us pause to think critically about the social economical issues that minority populations face daily. The CDC numbers are alarming and illuminating to social economic issues which can neither be ignored nor accepted. How has Corona impacted you and your loved ones? What will you do differently since Corona? What re 3 things you will do today to improve your health? What questions do you have about the foods you consume daily? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. You are at the center of our thoughts and prayers.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.