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COVID-19 Live Updates | Virginia hits 160,000 cases

covid 19 shidonna raven garden and cook

Friday, Oct. 23

10:40 a.m.

The Virginia Department of Health added 944 confirmed cases and 19 confirmed deaths from yesterday.

That brings Virginia’s running COVID-19 dashboard on Friday to 160,004 confirmed cases and 3,293 confirmed deaths related to COVID-19.

Health officials have run more than 2.47 million coronavirus tests to track the virus in the Commonwealth, so far.

Here are the cases newly reported for Hampton Roads:

  • Virginia Beach — 43
  • Chesapeake — 17
  • Portsmouth — 31
  • Norfolk — 39
  • Newport News — 16
  • Suffolk — 11
  • Hampton — 8
  • York County — 0
  • James City County — 3
  • Gloucester County — 2
  • Isle of Wight County — 8
  • Poquoson — 2
  • Mathews County — 0
  • Williamsburg — 1

Where are you located? How is your state or logicality dealing with the pandemic? How many cases do you have there?

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Some doctors using Vitamin D for COVID-19 prevention, treatment

vitamin d Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Researchers found deaths from respiratory illness were three times higher for those with a Vitamin D deficiency

ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) – The race to find a universal cure for COVID is heating up. Now Vitamin D is making headlines as a possible factor to prevent and treat COVID-19.

Vitamin D is vital in allowing your body to absorb calcium to strengthen bones.

“Vitamin D is certainly a good thing if a physician recommends it,” said Jeffrey Drebin, MD, PhD Chair, of the Department of Surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

But how does it work when it comes to COVID? In a German trial of nearly 10,000 people, researchers found deaths from respiratory illness were three times higher for those with a Vitamin D deficiency. While at Northwestern University, researchers analyzed data from ten countries and found patients with severe Vitamin D deficiencies were twice as likely to suffer complications from COVID. But experts are cautioning that more research needs to be done and not to overdo it with Vitamin D.

“It can have side effects,” continued Dr. Drebin.

Too much Vitamin D can be toxic and lead to heart and kidney problems. According to the National Institutes of Health, daily intake of 25 to 100 micrograms, or 1000 to 4000 UI, is safe for most people.

Two population groups most commonly affected by Vitamin D deficiencies are African Americans and the elderly, the two groups also most impacted by COVID-19.

Contributors to this news report include: Milvionne Chery, Producer; and Roque Correa, Editor.
Copyright 2020 by Ivanhoe Newswire – All rights reserved.
Source: Ksat News

Many are taking precautions daily from individuals to business to guard against COVID 19. Boosting one’s immune system with vitamin D, C and echinacea are one of the ways people are doing this. What are some precautions that you are taking? Did you change your diet? Why? Why not?

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Growing Marigold

Marigold Plant Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

We received a report that one of the Marigold Plants we sent out is doing very well. While we have begun preparations for bringing the plants in for the winter this Marigold is still outside and doing well as this winter has had unusual moments of high temperatures. Like many flowers the foliage comes first and then bursts of blooms. This flower has a tall and sturdy stalk with lots of foliage and a bud that looks like it is ready to bloom autumn colors of yellow just in time for Halloween. Like many foods and flowers, Marigolds come in many varieties.

What are your favorite flowers? Which flowers would you choose for a rain garden? Why?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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Tea in Bloom

Tea Infuser Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Speaking of flowers, flowers and herbs are often used to make the teas we enjoy. Teas are also a way of harvesting plants with medicinal powers for consumption. Chamomile tea is one of many teas with medicinal properties. The following are some of its benefits.

Benefits of chamomile tea

The potential benefits of chamomile tea, for which there is the most evidence, include:

1. Reducing menstrual pain

Several studies have linked chamomile tea to reduced severity of menstrual cramps. A 2010 study, for example, found that consuming chamomile tea for a month could reduce the pain of menstrual cramps. Women in the study also reported less anxiety and distress associated with period pain.

2. Treating diabetes and lowering blood sugar

Again, some studies have found that chamomile tea can lower blood sugar in people with diabetes. Research does not show that chamomile is a viable substitute for diabetes medications, but it may be a helpful supplement to existing treatments.

Similarly, a 2008 study of rats found that consistent consumption of chamomile tea might prevent blood sugar from increasing. This effect reduces the long-term risk of diabetes complications, suggesting that chamomile could improve diabetes outcomes.

3. Slowing or preventing osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is the progressive loss of bone density. This loss increases the risk of broken bones and stooped posture. While anyone can develop osteoporosis, it is most common among post-menopausal women. This tendency may be due to the effects of estrogen.

2004 study found that chamomile tea might have anti-estrogenic effects. It also helped promote bone density, but the study’s authors caution that further research is needed to prove this apparent benefit.

4. Reducing inflammation

Inflammation is an immune system reaction to fight infection. Chamomile tea contains chemical compounds that may reduce inflammation. However, long-term inflammation is linked to a wide range of health problems, including hemorrhoids, gastrointestinal pain, arthritis, autoimmune disorders, and even depression.

5. Cancer treatment and prevention

Some studies suggest that chamomile tea may target cancer cells, or even prevent those cells from developing in the first place. However, research so far is inconclusive, and scientists say more work is needed to prove chamomile’s anti-cancer claims. Also, most research has looked at clinical models in animals, not humans.

2012 study compared the cancer-fighting powers of marigold and chamomile teas. Both were able to target cancer tumors selectively, but the effects of marigold tea were more potent.

6. Helping with sleep and relaxation

Chamomile tea is widely thought to help people relax and fall asleep. Few clinical trials have tested this, however.

In one review of the current evidence, 10 of 12 cardiovascular patients are quoted as having fallen asleep shortly after consuming chamomile tea. A handful of other studies looking at clinical models also suggest that chamomile tea may help people relax.

In a study using rats, chamomile extract helped sleep-disturbed rodents fall asleep. Many researchers believe that chamomile tea may function like a benzodiazepine. Benzodiazepines are prescription drugs that can reduce anxiety and induce sleep. Some research suggests that chamomile binds to benzodiazepine receptors.

A review looking at the ability of chamomile tea to reduce anxiety is inconclusive. Some studies show a modest anti-anxiety benefit, but others do not.

7. Treating cold symptoms

Anecdotal evidence and some studies suggest that inhaling steam with chamomile extract can relieve some of the symptoms of the common cold. But this benefit is not proven yet.

8. Treatment for mild skin conditions

small 1987 study found that applying chamomile extract directly to a wound assisted healing. Likewise, a few studies have found that chamomile ointments may help with eczema and mild inflammatory skin conditions, although they are not as effective as hydrocortisone cream.
Source: Medical News Today

What are your favorite teas? What are their medicinal purposes? What are the benefits of their medicinal purposes?

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GP stalked patient after accessing her medical records to get phone number, tribunal hears

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

14 JANUARY 2019 • 12:25PM 

AGP was accused of stalking a patient after accessing her medical records so he could obtain her mobile phone number, a medical tribunal heard.

Dr Chika Mbah, 37, allegedly sent a stream of WhatsApp messages asking the woman out for a date and turned up once outside her home after signing her off work for work-related stress.

The woman repeatedly declined his invitation but father-of-two Mbah, who called himself ‘Dr Sandy’, kept calling her and left messages saying: “How are you stranger? – don’t you remember, it’s me, Dr Sandy?,’ the tribunal heard.

The patient, who was not named and known as Patient A, was grieving at the time Mbah contacted her following the death of her grandparent. 

She was said to be so uncomfortable as a result of his advances that she refused to attend his surgery for an urgent check up over a stomach problem.

Mbah was suspended from medical practice for three months after he was found guilty of misconduct when he admitted pursuing an improper relationship with the patient. 

But he denied allegations of illicitly accessing her medical records and the panel found no evidence of “any predatory behaviour”.

In a statement read out at the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service in Manchester, the woman said: “During many messages, he asked me out for a drink which I did not go to and I received the odd phone call for a chat.

Health care fraud comes in many forms. Would you recognize it if you saw it? What does it look like? What are the costs?

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Yes, Google’s using your healthcare data – and it’s not alone

Google Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

There’s a multi-billion dollar industry built around collecting healthcare data and anonymizing it so it can be used for research; it’s perfectly legal.

Source: Computer World
By Lucas Mearian
Senior Reporter, Computerworld | NOV 15, 2019 9:49 AM PST

Google is working with one of the largest healthcare systems in the U.S. to collect patient data on millions of Americans in 21 states and across 2,600 hospitals or clinics in order to analyze it and come up with advice for better patient care and cost cutting measures.

The project was reportedly revealed by a whistleblower who said the program, dubbed “Project Nightingale,” involved Ascension – the largest Catholic health system in the world – and up to 50 million private medical records from healthcare providers.

It wasn’t Google’s only public controversy this week. Shortly after its deal with Ascension became public, The Washington Post reported that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) stopped the tech giant from posting more than 100,000 human chest x-rays.

Although the x-rays were part of a 2017 joint project with the NIH, the government agency discovered some of the images contained personally identifiable information of patients.

As for its deal with Ascension, Google said it had revealed plans to use its cloud data analytics to cull information from Ascension’s patient data during a Q2 earnings call in July, though “Project Nightingale” was never mentioned during that call. “We announced ‘Google Cloud’s AI and ML solutions are helping healthcare organizations like Ascension improve the healthcare experience and outcomes,'” Google Cloud President Tariq Shaukat said in a blog post.

“Our work with Ascension is exactly that – a business arrangement to help a provider with the latest technology, similar to the work we do with dozens of other healthcare providers, Shaukat wrote. The list of care providers and healthcare records tech  companies includes the Cleveland Clinic, the American Cancer Society, McKesson and Athena.

Shaukat said Google has a Business Associate Agreement (BAA) with Ascension, which governs access to Protected Health Information (PHI) for the purpose of helping providers support patient care.

“This is standard practice in healthcare, as patient data is frequently managed in electronic systems that nurses and doctors widely use to deliver patient care,” Shaukat said.

No matter how well intentioned the project’s overseers say it is, the collection of private medical data has raised the ire of patients and lawmakers who have called for a federal inquiry into the practice.

The Office for Civil Rights in the Department of Health and Human Services “will seek to learn more information about this mass collection of individuals’ medical records to ensure that HIPAA protections were fully implemented,” the office’s director, Roger Severino, said in a statement.

Third parties compiling patient data is not only common among healthcare providers and analytics tech firms, it’s perfectly legal – as long as patients have given consent by signing a common HIPAA form. And, wittingly or not, most have done so, according to Cynthia Burghard, a research director at IDC.

“Databases of this size are not uncommon,” Burghard said. “On face value, I don’t see an issue. They [Google] signed the HIPAA compliant document for business associate arrangements. So, they complied with the law there. When you go to a healthcare provider’s office as a patient, you sign a HIPAA release form, which allows the institutions to use your data for medical research or improved care management; so there is patient consent there.

“That said, long term can you trust Google or any high-tech company … who’s used to monetizing assets to not do something bad?” Burghard said.

Many healthcare providers are storing patient data for analytics purposes in a cloud somewhere, whether it’s Amazon Web Services, Microsoft’s Azure or Google Cloud.

In September, controversy around patient privacy erupted when Google acquired the health division of London-based AI firm DeepMind, which built a healthcare app used to give clinicians at National Health Service [NHS] hospitals easy access to medical records. DeepMind’s Streams app was already controversial after a UK privacy watchdog found the NHS had illegally handed 1.6 million patient records to DeepMind as part of a trial.

Last year, Amazon, JPMorgan and Berkshire formed a partnership to create a private healthcare company aimed at lowering the cost of care.

According to Adam Tanner, author of the book “Our Bodies, Our Data: How Companies Make Billions Selling Our Medical Records,” businesses that have nothing to do with medical treatment are allowed to buy and sell healthcare data, provided they remove certain fields of information, including birth date, name and Social Security number.

The guidelines, outlined in U.S. HIPAA rules, have allowed a multi-billion-dollar market  in anonymized patient data to emerge in recent years, with data-mining firms collecting dossiers on hundreds of millions of patients, according to Tanner. A growing number of data scientists and healthcare experts say the same computing advances that allow the aggregation of millions of anonymized patient files into a dossier also make it increasingly possible to re-identify those files — that is, to match identities to patients.

An earlier study by Carnegie Mellon University showed how anonymized U.S. Census data could uniquely, or nearly uniquely, identify some individuals simply by combining a few characteristics found in populations.

“Clearly, data released containing such information about these individuals should not be considered anonymous. Yet, health and other person-specific data are publicly available in this form,” said Latanya Sweeney, the report author and director of the Data Privacy Lab at Carnegie Mellon University.

The healthcare information, stripped of basic personal identifiers is sold off to researchers, drug developers, marketers and others. Medical informatics companies, such as Iqvia (IMS Health), Optum, and Symphony Health reap the profits of selling the healthcare data while the people from whom it’s collected have no control over how it’s used. Nor do they get any compensation for it.

Last year, start-up Hu-manity.co partnered with IBM to develop a blockchain-based electronic ledger that gives consumers the cryptographic key to their personal data, even allowing patients or others to control the specific purpose for which it’s used, while also allowing them to eventually profit from it.

In 2015, IBM launched its Watson Health global analytics cloud to enable healthcare providers and researchers to upload and analyze patient data for greater insights into trends and to “improve individual and overall patient outcomes.” The next year, IBM bought Truven Health Analytics for $2.6 billion, adding a trove of previously amassed patient data to its collection. It was IBM’s fourth major health data-related acquisition since launching the Watson Health unit.

At the time of the Truven buyout, IBM Health announced it had healthcare data on “approximately 300 million patient lives,” most from the U.S.

When IBM bought Truven, it got tens of millions of records and years of [health insurance] claims data “they could monetize by selling analysis and reports and access to your claims data,” Burghard said.

In the same way, Google’s cloud analytics platform uses AI and machine learning to process patient data and deliver potential best practices for care and cost savings.

Amazon, Apple, Microsoft and other tech giants are also entering the healthcare arena, either with applications that enable access to patient electronic healthcare records, or with their own in-house healthcare programs.

Earlier this year, pharmacy giant CVS and its healthcare insurance subsidiary, Aetna, released an app that lets members opt-in to sharing their EMRS with Apple’s health service; in turn, Apple will offer Apple Watch wearers personalized fitness and health goals.Related: 

Senior Reporter Lucas Mearian covers financial services IT (including blockchain), healthcare IT and enterprise mobile issues (including mobility management, security, hardware and apps).Follow

Copyright © 2019 IDG Communications, Inc.

Should health care providers disclose and ask how you would like your health care information shared? What do you think about your health care information being monetized? What do you think about your health care information being used without your permission.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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Making Rose Water

Making Rose Water
Source: Mother Earth Living
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

We are all about food and health around here! Rose Water is used in one of my favorite desserts: Baklava! and many other wonderful foods. What are your favorite desserts? What other ways do you cook with Rose Water? What is your favorite dessert?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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Making Echinacea Tincture – Medicinal Herbs

Making Echinacea Tincture – Medicinal Herbs
Source: Rosemary Gladstar
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

More wonderful than eating food for the taste is eating foods for their healing or medicinal purposes. In a time where the corona virus is running rampant around the globe and claiming lives at all levels foods that get at the heart of healing are a huge comfort. Enjoy this simple and straightforward method for harvesting your foods for their medicinal benefits.

Echinacea is one of our favorites because it boosts the immune system, which is especially comforting now and during any cold season. What are your favorite herbs? What are their medicinal purposes? What foods do you take when you become ill?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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The Largest Unethical Medical Experiment in Human History – Georgia Institute of Technology

Georgia Tech Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Source: Georgia Institute of Technology
This monograph describes the largest unethical medical experiment in human history: the implementation and operation of non-ionizing non-visible EMF radiation (hereafter called wireless radiation) infrastructure for communications, surveillance, weaponry, and other applications. It is unethical because it violates the key ethical medical experiment requirement for “informed consent” by the overwhelming majority of the participants. The monograph provides background on unethical medical research/experimentation, and frames the implementation of wireless radiation within that context. The monograph then identifies a wide spectrum of adverse effects of wireless radiation as reported in the premier biomedical literature for over seven decades. Even though many of these reported adverse effects are extremely severe, the true extent of their severity has been grossly underestimated. Most of the reported laboratory experiments that produced these effects are not reflective of the real-life environment in which wireless radiation operates. Many experiments do not include pulsing and modulation of the carrier signal, and most do not account for synergistic effects of other toxic stimuli acting in concert with the wireless radiation. These two additions greatly exacerbate the severity of the adverse effects from wireless radiation, and their neglect in current (and past) experimentation results in substantial under-estimation of the breadth and severity of adverse effects to be expected in a real-life situation. This lack of credible safety testing, combined with depriving the public of the opportunity to provide informed consent, contextualizes the wireless radiation infrastructure operation as an unethical medical experiment.

Indeed, at the hart of many unethical medical experiments is the lack of informed consent and the loss of consent. Would you recognize an unauthorized and unethical medical experiment if you saw one? What would it look like? How would one report it? In fact in the past some governments have been apart of unethical experiments. The most widely known of these in recent history were the experiments conducted by the Nazis.

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Echinacea: Medicinal Benefits – Health Line

Echinacea shidonna raven garden and cook

Source: Health Line
Research on echinacea suggests that it offers several impressive health benefits.

Positive Effect on the Immune System

Echinacea is best known for its beneficial effects on the immune system.

Numerous studies have found that this plant may help your immune system combat infections and viruses, which could help you recover faster from illness (8Trusted Source9Trusted Source10Trusted Source).

That’s one reason why echinacea is often used to prevent or treat the common cold.

In fact, a review of 14 studies found that taking echinacea may lower the risk of developing colds by more than 50% and shorten the duration of colds by one and a half days (11Trusted Source).

However, many studies on this topic are poorly designed and show no real benefit. This makes it hard to know if any benefits on colds are from taking echinacea or simply from chance (12Trusted Source).

In short, while echinacea may boost immunity, its effects on the common cold are unclear.

May Lower Blood Sugar Levels

High blood sugar can raise your risk of serious health problems.

This includes type 2 diabetes, heart disease and several other chronic conditions.

Test-tube studies have found that echinacea plants may help lower blood sugar levels.

In a test-tube study, an Echinacea purpurea extract was shown to suppress enzymes that digest carbohydrates. This would reduce the amount of sugar entering your blood if consumed (13Trusted Source).

Other test-tube studies found that echinacea extracts made cells more sensitive to insulin’s effects by activating the PPAR-y receptor, a common target of diabetes drugs (14Trusted Source15).

This particular receptor works by removing excess fat in the blood, which is a risk factor for insulin resistance. This makes it easier for cells to respond to insulin and sugar (16Trusted Source).

Still, human-based research on the effects of echinacea on blood sugar is lacking.

May Reduce Feelings of Anxiety

Anxiety is a common problem that affects close to one in five American adults (17).

In recent years, echinacea plants have emerged as a potential aid for anxiety.

Research has discovered that echinacea plants contain compounds that may reduce feelings of anxiety. These include alkamides, rosmarinic acid and caffeic acid (18Trusted Source).

In one mouse study, three out of five echinacea samples helped reduce anxiety. In addition, they did not make the mice less active, in contrast to higher doses of standard treatments (18Trusted Source).

Another study found that Echinacea angustifolia extract rapidly reduced feelings of anxiety in both mice and humans (19Trusted Source).

However, as of now, only a handful of studies on echinacea and anxiety exist. More research is needed before echinacea products can be recommended as a possible treatment.

Anti-Inflammatory Properties

Inflammation is your body’s natural way of promoting healing and defending itself.

Sometimes inflammation can get out of hand and last for longer than necessary and expected. This may raise your risk of chronic diseases and other health problems.

Several studies have shown that echinacea can help reduce excess inflammation.

In a mouse study, echinacea compounds helped reduce important inflammatory markers and memory-loss caused by inflammation (20Trusted Source).

In another 30-day study, adults with osteoarthritis found that taking a supplement containing echinacea extract significantly reduced inflammation, chronic pain and swelling.

Interestingly, these adults did not respond well to conventional non-steroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) but found the supplement containing echinacea extract helpful (21Trusted Source).

May Help Treat Skin Concerns

Research has shown that echinacea plants may help treat common skin concerns.

In a test-tube study, scientists found that echinacea’s anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties suppressed the growth of Propionibacterium, a common cause of acne (22Trusted Source).

In another study in 10 healthy people aged 25–40, skin care products containing echinacea extract were found to improve skin hydration and reduce wrinkles (23Trusted Source).

Similarly, a cream containing Echinacea purpurea extract was shown to improve eczema symptoms and help repair the skin’s thin, protective outer layer (24Trusted Source).

However, echinacea extract appears to have a short shelf life, making it difficult to incorporate into commercial skin care products.

May Offer Protection Against Cancer

Cancer is a disease that involves the uncontrolled growth of cells.

Test-tube studies have shown that echinacea extracts may suppress cancer cell growth and even trigger cancer cell death (25Trusted Source26Trusted Source).

In one test-tube study, an extract of Echinacea purpurea and chicoric acid (naturally found in echinacea plants) was shown to trigger cancer cell death (25Trusted Source).

In another test-tube study, extracts from echinacea plants (Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea pallida) killed human cancer cells from the pancreas and colon by stimulating a process called apoptosis or controlled cell death (26Trusted Source).

It’s believed that this effect occurs due to echinacea’s immune-boosting properties (27Trusted Source).

There was some concern that echinacea could interact with conventional cancer treatments, such as doxorubicin, but newer studies have found no interaction (28Trusted Source29Trusted Source).

That being said, human studies are needed before making any recommendations.

SUMMARY

Echinacea has been shown to improve immunity, blood sugar, anxiety, inflammation and skin health. It may even have anti-cancer properties. However, human-based research on these benefits is often limited.

Potential Side Effects

Echinacea products appear to be safe and well-tolerated for short-term use.

There have been cases where people experienced side effects, such as (3Trusted Source):

  • Rashes
  • Itchy skin
  • Hives
  • Swelling
  • Stomach pain
  • Nausea
  • Shortness of breath

However, these side effects are more common among people with allergies to other flowers, such as daisies, chrysanthemums, marigolds, ragweed and more (3031Trusted Source).

As echinacea appears to stimulate the immune system, people with autoimmune disorders or people taking immunosuppressive drugs should avoid it or consult their doctors first (3Trusted Source).

While it appears to be safe for short-term use, its long-term effects are still relatively unknown.

SUMMARY

Echinacea appears to be safe and well tolerated in the short term, but its long-term effects are relatively unknown.

Dosage Recommendations

There is currently no official dosage recommendation for echinacea.

One reason being that findings from echinacea research are highly variable.

In addition, echinacea products often may not contain what is written on the label. One study found that 10% of echinacea products samples did not contain any echinacea (32Trusted Source).

This is why you should purchase echinacea products from trusted brands.

That said, research has found the following doses to be effective in aiding immunity (11Trusted Source):

  • Dry powdered extract: 300–500 mg of Echinacea purpurea, three times daily.
  • Liquid extract tinctures: 2.5 ml, three times daily, or up to 10 ml daily.

However, it’s best to follow the instructions that come with your specific supplement.

Keep in mind that these recommendations are for short-term use, as echinacea’s long-term effects on the body are still relatively unknown.

SUMMARY

Echinacea products are highly variable, which makes it hard to set a standard recommended dosage. The dosages vary with the form of echinacea you’re using.

The Bottom Line

Echinacea has been shown to improve immunity, blood sugar, anxiety, inflammation and skin health. It may even have anti-cancer properties. However, human-based research is often limited.

It’s considered safe and well tolerated for short-term use.

Suggested dosages vary depending on the form of echinacea you’re using.

Although it’s commonly used to treat the common cold, results in this area are mixed. While research has shown it may help prevent colds, shorten their duration or provide symptomatic relief, many studies have been poorly designed or shown no real benefit.

That said, there aren’t many products like echinacea with similar potential immune-boosting effects, so it might be worth trying it out.

During the pandemic many medical professionals are recommending immune boosting foods like echinace, vitamin c and d. What are you taking? How has it worked for you? Why do you take what you do?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.