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The Great Garlic Medicinal Benefits

Source: Medical News Today

Fast facts on garlic

  • In many countries, garlic has been used medicinally for centuries.
  • Garlic may have a range of health benefits, both raw and cooked.
  • It may have significant antibiotic properties.

History

Bulbs and bowl of garlic
There are many medicinal claims about garlic.
Source: Medical News Today
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Garlic has been used all over the world for thousands of years. Records indicate that garlic was in use when the Giza pyramids were built, about 5,000 years ago.

Richard S. Rivlin wrote in the Journal of Nutrition that the ancient Greek physician Hippocrates (circa. 460-370 BC), known today as “the father of Western medicine,” prescribed garlic for a wide range of conditions and illnesses. Hippocrates promoted the use of garlic for treating respiratory problems, parasites, poor digestion, and fatigue.

The original Olympic athletes in Ancient Greece were given garlic – possibly the earliest example of “performance enhancing” agents used in sports.

From Ancient Egypt, garlic spread to the advanced ancient civilizations of the Indus Valley (Pakistan and western India today). From there, it made its way to China.

According to experts at Kew Gardens, England’s royal botanical center of excellence, the people of ancient India valued the therapeutic properties of garlic and also thought it to be an aphrodisiac. The upper classes avoided garlic because they despised its strong odor, while monks, “…widows, adolescents, and those who had taken up a vow or were fasting, could not eat garlic because of its stimulant quality.”

Throughout history in the Middle East, East Asia, and Nepal, garlic has been used to treat bronchitis, hypertension (high blood pressure), TB (tuberculosis), liver disorders, dysenteryflatulencecolic, intestinal worms, rheumatism, diabetes, and fevers.

The French, Spanish, and Portuguese introduced garlic to the New World.

Uses

Currently, garlic is widely used for several conditions linked to the blood system and heart, including atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), high cholesterolheart attackcoronary heart disease, and hypertension.

Garlic is also used today by some people for the prevention of lung cancerprostate cancerbreast cancerstomach cancer, rectal cancer, and colon cancer.

It is important to add that only some of these uses are backed by research.

A study published in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology warned that short-term heating reduces the anti-inflammatory effects of fresh raw garlic extracts. This may be a problem for some people who do not like or cannot tolerate the taste and/or odor of fresh garlic.

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Benefits

Below are examples of some scientific studies published in peer-reviewed academic journals about the therapeutic benefits (or not) of garlic.

Lung cancer risk

People who ate raw garlic at least twice a week during the 7 year study period had a 44 percent lower risk of developing lung cancer, according to a study conducted at the Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention in China.

The researchers, who published their study in the journal Cancer Prevention Research, carried out face-to-face interviews with 1,424 lung cancer patients and 4,543 healthy individuals. They were asked about their diet and lifestyle, including questions on smoking and how often they ate garlic.

The study authors wrote: “Protective association between intake of raw garlic and lung cancer has been observed with a dose-response pattern, suggesting that garlic may potentially serve as a chemo-preventive agent for lung cancer.”

Brain cancer

Organo-sulfur compounds found in garlic have been identified as effective in destroying the cells in glioblastomas, a type of deadly brain tumor.

Scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina reported in the journal Cancer that three pure organo-sulfur compounds from garlic – DAS, DADS, and DATS – “demonstrated efficacy in eradicating brain cancer cells, but DATS proved to be the most effective.”

Co-author, Ray Swapan, Ph.D., said “This research highlights the great promise of plant-originated compounds as natural medicine for controlling the malignant growth of human brain tumor cells. More studies are needed in animal models of brain tumors before application of this therapeutic strategy to brain tumor patients.”

Hip osteoarthritis

Women whose diets were rich in allium vegetables had lower levels of osteoarthritis, a team at King’s College London and the University of East Anglia, both in England, reported in the journal BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders. Examples of allium vegetables include garlic, leeks, shallots, onions, and rakkyo.

The study authors said their findings not only highlighted the possible impact of diet on osteoarthritis outcomes but also demonstrated the potential for using compounds that exist in garlic to develop treatments for the condition.

The long-term study, involving more than 1,000 healthy female twins, found that those whose dietary habits included plenty of fruit and vegetables, “particularly alliums such as garlic,” had fewer signs of early osteoarthritis in the hip joint.

Potentially a powerful antibiotic

Diallyl sulfide, a compound in garlic, was 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics in fighting the Campylobacter bacterium, according to a study published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

The Campylobacter bacterium is one of the most common causes of intestinal infections.

Senior author, Dr. Xiaonan Lu, from Washington State University, said, “This work is very exciting to me because it shows that this compound has the potential to reduce disease-causing bacteria in the environment and in our food supply.”

Heart protection

Garlic in heart-shaped bowl
Garlic may contain heart-protective chemicals.
Source: Medical News Today
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Diallyl trisulfide, a component of garlic oil, helps protect the heart during cardiac surgery and after a heart attack, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine found. They also believe diallyl trisulfide could be used as a treatment for heart failure.

Hydrogen sulfide gas has been shown to protect the heart from damage.

However, it is a volatile compound and difficult to deliver as therapy.

Because of this, the scientists decided to focus on diallyl trisulfide, a garlic oil component, as a safer way to deliver the benefits of hydrogen sulfide to the heart.

In experiments using laboratory mice, the team found that, after a heart attack, the mice that had received diallyl sulfide had 61 percent less heart damage in the area at risk, compared with the untreated mice.

In another study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists found that garlic oil may help protect diabetes patients from cardiomyopathy.

Cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of death among diabetes patients. It is a chronic disease of the myocardium (heart muscle), which is abnormally thickened, enlarged, and/or stiffened.

The team fed diabetic laboratory rats either garlic oil or corn oil. Those fed garlic oil experienced significantly more changes associated with protection against heart damage, compared with the animals that were fed corn oil.

The study authors wrote, “In conclusion, garlic oil possesses significant potential for protecting hearts from diabetes-induced cardiomyopathy.”

Human studies will need to be performed to confirm the results of this study.

High cholesterol and high blood pressure

Researchers at Ankara University investigated the effects of garlic extract supplementation on the blood lipid (fat) profile of patients with high blood cholesterol. Their study was published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry.

The study involved 23 volunteers, all with high cholesterol; 13 of them also had high blood pressure. They were divided into two groups:

  • The high-cholesterol normotensive group (normal blood pressure).
  • The high-cholesterol hypertensive group (high blood pressure).

They took garlic extract supplements for 4 months and were regularly checked for blood lipid parameters, as well as kidney and liver function.

At the end of the 4 months, the researchers concluded “…garlic extract supplementation improves blood lipid profile, strengthens blood antioxidant potential, and causes significant reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressures. It also leads to a decrease in the level of oxidation product (MDA) in the blood samples, which demonstrates reduced oxidation reactions in the body.”

In other words, the garlic extract supplements reduced high cholesterol levels, and also blood pressure in the patients with hypertension. The scientists added that theirs was a small study – more work needs to be carried out.

Prostate cancer

Doctors at the Department of Urology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, China, carried out a study evaluating the relationship between Allium vegetable consumption and prostate cancer risk.

They gathered and analyzed published studies up to May 2013 and reported their findings in the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.

The study authors concluded, “Allium vegetables, especially garlic intake, are related to a decreased risk of prostate cancer.”

The team also commented that because there are not many relevant studies, further well-designed prospective studies should be carried out to confirm their findings.

Alcohol-induced liver injury

Alcohol-induced liver injury is caused by the long-term over-consumption of alcoholic beverages.

Scientists at the Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Shandong University, China, wanted to determine whether diallyl disulfide (DADS), a garlic-derived organosulfur compound, might have protective effects against ethanol-induced oxidative stress.

Their study was published in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta.

The researchers concluded that DADS might help protect against ethanol-induced liver injury.

Preterm (premature) delivery

Microbial infections during pregnancy raise a woman’s risk of preterm delivery. Scientists at the Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, studied what impact foods might have on antimicrobial infections and preterm delivery risk.

The study and its findings were published in the Journal of Nutrition.

Ronny Myhre and colleagues concentrated on the effects of Alliums and dried fruits, because a literature search had identified these two foods as showing the greatest promise for reducing preterm delivery risk.

The team investigated the intake of dried fruit and Alliums among 18,888 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort, of whom 5 percent (950) underwent spontaneous PTD (preterm delivery).

The study authors concluded, “Intake of food with antimicrobial and prebiotic compounds may be of importance to reduce the risk of spontaneous PTD. In particular, garlic was associated with overall lower risk of spontaneous PTD.”

Garlic and the common cold

A team of researchers from St. Joseph Family Medicine Residency, Indiana, carried out a study titled “Treatment of the Common Cold in Children and Adults,” published in American Family Physician.

They reported that “Prophylactic use of garlic may decrease the frequency of colds in adults, but has no effect on duration of symptoms.” Prophylactic use means using it regularly to prevent disease.

Though there is some research to suggest that raw garlic has the most benefits, other studies have looked at overall allium intake, both raw and cooked, and have found benefits. Therefore, you can enjoy garlic in a variety of ways to reap its advantages.

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Parsley & Pasta

Shidonna Garden and Cook Parsley and Pasta

Source: Shidonna Raven – Garden and Cook
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Featured Photo Source: Shidonna Raven Garden & Cook

There are few things that go together like parsley and pasta. Some of us love cheese and others do not. But, nothing goes better than a cheese based Italian sauce / dish and parsley. We brought our parsley plant indoors for the winter and she has been doing even better than when she was outside. Her stems are very tall as she reaches for the resources of the sun. We will have to remember to turn her so she does not lean to one side causing her stems to weaken. Our parsley plant was already in the pot and ready to go. She had been sitting on the porch.

As one can see this pasta dish is tomato based and our parsley was used as a garnish. Parsley typically has a very mild flavor and is often used as a garnish. Despite its mild flavor a nice cheese based Italian sauce really brings at its mild notes. We used garlic in our dish. Garlic is typically difficult to avoid when cooking Italian dishes particularly tomato based ones. Keep reading to learn more about the medicinal benefits of the great garlic! What plants have you been growing indoors? How have the been doing in the winter? Are the fruit bearing plants? What type of dishes would you like to see and what are their health benefits?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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29 nutrition tips for better health and longevity

salad with cooked garden fresh beans shidonna raven

Source: Medical News Today
Featured Photo Source: Shidonna Raven Garden & Cook


Good nutrition is a critical part of health and development. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), better nutrition is related to improved health at all ages, a lower risk of diseases, and longevity.

People can find it difficult or confusing to navigate the amount of nutrition information now available, and many sources have differing views.

This article offers science-based nutrition tips to help someone lead a healthier lifestyle.

Nutrition tips for diet

Following these nutrition tips will help a person make healthy food choices.

1. Include protein with every meal

Including some protein with every meal can help balance blood sugar.

Some studies suggest higher protein diets can be beneficial for type 2 diabetes.

Other research indicates balancing blood sugar can support weight management and cardiovascular health.

2. Eat oily fish

According to research, omega-3 fatty acids in oily fish are essential for cell signaling, gene expression, and brain and eye development.

Some studies indicate that omega-3 fatty acids can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Other research suggests the anti-inflammatory properties of omega-3 may effectively manage the early stages of degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease.

3. Eat whole grains

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommend people eat whole grains rather than refined grains.

Whole grains contain nutrients such as B vitamins, iron, and fiber. These nutrients are essential for body functions that include carrying oxygen in the blood, regulating the immune system, and balancing blood sugar.

4. Eat a rainbow

The saying ‘eat a rainbow’ helps remind people to eat different colored fruits and vegetables.

Varying the color of plant foods means that someone gets a wide variety of antioxidants beneficial to health, for example, carotenoids and anthocyanins.

5. Eat your greens

Dark green leafy vegetables are a great source of nutrition, according to the Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Leafy greens are rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

The USDA suggest that folate in leafy greens may help protect against cancer, while vitamin K helps prevent osteoporosis.

6. Include healthful fats

People should limit their intake of saturated fats while avoiding trans fats, according to the USDA.

A person can replace these fats with unsaturated fats, which they can find in foods such as avocado, oily fish, and vegetable oils.

7. Use extra virgin olive oil

As part of the Mediterranean diet, extra virgin olive oil has benefits to the heart, blood pressure, and weight, according to a 2018 health report.

A person can include extra virgin olive oil in their diet by adding it to salads or vegetables or cooking food at low temperatures.

8. Eat nuts

According to the AHA, eating one serving of nuts daily in place of red or processed meat, french fries, or dessert may benefit health and prevent long-term weight gain.

The AHA suggest that Brazil nuts, in particular, may help someone feel fuller and stabilize their blood sugar.

9. Get enough fiber

According to the AHA, fiber can help improve blood cholesterol levels and lower the risk of heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

People can get enough fiber in their diet by eating whole grains, vegetables, beans, and pulses.

10. Increase plant foods

Research suggests that plant-based diets may help prevent overweight and obesity. Doctors associate obesity with many diseases.

According to some studies, including more plant foods in the diet could reduce the risk of developing diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

11. Try beans and pulses

Beans and pulses are a good source of protein for people on a plant-based diet. However, those who eat meat can eat them on a few meat-free days a week.

Beans and pulses also contain beneficial fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

Some research even says pulses may help people feel fuller and lose weight.

Nutrition tips for what to drink

Drinking plenty of healthy fluids has numerous health benefits. Health experts recommend these tips:

12. Drink water

Drinking enough water every day is good for overall health and can help manage body weight, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Drinking water can prevent dehydration, which can be a particular risk for older adults.

If someone does not like plain water, they can add some citrus slices and mint leaves to increase the appeal, or drink herbal teas.

13. Enjoy coffee

2017 study suggests that moderate coffee consumption of 3–5 cups a day can reduce the risk of:

  • type 2 diabetes
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • cardiovascular diseases

According to the same review, the recommended amount reduces to 2 cups per day for pregnant and lactating people.

14. Drink herbal teas

According to research, catechins in green, black, and other herbal teas may have antimicrobial properties.

Herbal teas, such as mint, chamomile, and rooibos, are caffeine-free and help keep someone hydrated throughout the day.READER SURVEYPlease take a quick 1-minute survey

Nutrition tips for foods and drinks to avoid

It is important to cut back on food and drink that may have harmful health consequences. For example, a person may want to:

15. Reduce sugar

According to research, dietary sugar, dextrose, and high fructose corn syrup may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome.

People should look out for hidden sugars in foods that manufacturers label as names ending in “-ose,” for example, fructose, sucrose, and glucose.

Natural sugars, such as honey and maple syrup, could also contribute to weight gain if someone eats them too often.

16. Drink alcohol in moderation

Dietary Guidelines For Americans recommend that if someone consumes alcohol, it should be in moderation.

They advise up to one drink per day for females and up to two drinks per day for males.

Excessive drinking increases the risk of chronic diseases and violence, and over time, can impair short and long-term cognitive function.

17. Avoid sugary drinks

The CDC associate frequently drinking sugary drinks with:

  • weight gain and obesity
  • type 2 diabetes
  • heart disease
  • kidney disease
  • non-alcoholic liver disease
  • tooth decay and cavities
  • gout, a type of arthritis

People should limit their consumption of sugary drinks and preferably drink water instead.

18. Eat less red and processed meat

A large prospective study in the British Medical Journal indicates that U.S. adults eating more red and processed meat had higher mortality rates.

Participants who swapped meat for other protein sources, such as fish, nuts, and eggs, had a lower risk of death in the eight-year study period.

19. Avoid processed foods

According to a review in Nutrients, eating ultra-processed foods can increase the risk of many diseases, including cancer, irritable bowel syndrome, and depression.

People should instead consume whole foods and avoid foods with long lists of processed ingredients.MEDICAL NEWS TODAY NEWSLETTERStay in the know. Get our free daily newsletter

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Other good health habits

There are several steps a person can take to improve their health in addition to consuming healthful foods and drinks.

20. Support your microbiome

A 2019 review in Nutrients suggests that a high quality, balanced diet supports microbial diversity and can influence the risk of chronic diseases.

The authors indicate that including vegetables and fiber are beneficial to the microbiome. Conversely, eating too many refined carbohydrates and sugars is detrimental.

21. Consider a vitamin D supplement

The recommended dietary allowance for vitamin D is 15 micrograms or 600 international units per day for adults.

Many people get some of their vitamin D from sunlight, while it is also in some foods.

People with darker skin, older adults, and those who get less exposure to sunlight — such as during winter or in less sunny climates — may need to take a vitamin D supplement.

22. Be aware of portion size

Being aware of portion sizes can help people manage their weight and diet.

The USDA have helpful information about portion sizes for different food patterns.

People can adapt the guidelines to suit their cultural or personal preferences.

23. Use herbs and spices

Using herbs and spices in cooking can liven up a meal and have additional health benefits.

2019 review suggests that the active compounds in ginger may help prevent oxidative stress and inflammation that occurs as part of aging.

Curcumin in turmeric is anti-inflammatory and may have protective effects on health, according to research.

Garlic has many benefits, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties.

24. Give your body a rest by fasting

Intermittent fasting involves not eating either overnight or some days of the week. This may reduce energy intake and can have health benefits.

According to a 2020 review, intermittent fasting may improve blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and heart health.

25. Keep a food journal

The American Society for Nutrition say that keeping a food journal can help people track calories, see how much they are eating, and recognize food habits.

Keeping a food journal could help someone who wants to maintain a moderate weight or eat a more healthful diet.

Apps, such as MyFitnessPal, can also help someone achieve their goals.

26. Wash fruits and vegetables

Raw fruits and vegetables can contain harmful germs that could make someone sick, according to the CDC. They advise that Salmonella, E.coli, and listeria cause a large percentage of U.S. foodborne illness.

Always wash fresh produce when eating them raw.

27. Do not microwave in plastic containers

Research suggests that microwaving food in plastic containers can release phthalates, which can disrupt hormones.

Experts recommend heating food in glass or ceramic containers that are microwave-safe.

28. Eat varied meals

Many people eat the same meals regularly. Varying foods and trying different cuisines can help someone achieve their required nutrient intake.

This can be particularly helpful when trying to eat a broader range of vegetables or protein.

29. Eat mindfully

In a 2017 study, mindful eating helped adults with obesity eat fewer sweets and manage their blood glucose.

Another study suggests mindfulness can bring greater awareness to food triggers and habits in people with diabetes.

Summary

Nutrition is an essential part of health, and people can start leading a healthful lifestyle by making small changes to their diet.

It is also important to remember other key aspects of health, such as exercise and activity, stress strategies, and adequate sleep.

How can you include these nutrients into your diet to improve your health? What did you learn? What was most helpful?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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White House Kitchen Garden

Inside the White House: The Kitchen Garden

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The White House Kitchen Garden
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

The White House has an incredible garden. The Chefs got really involved and enjoyed pulling food from the garden that adorned the plates of dignitaries. Its amazing to something go from a seed to a full fledged vegetable or fruit on your plate. Do you think if you grew your own foods your children would eat more fruits and vegetables? Do you think if you ate more fruits and vegetables that your children will eat more fruits and vegetables? Do you think eating more fruits and vegetables would improve your health? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Nutrients and Organic

Are Organic Foods More Nutritious?

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Organic Foods and Nutrition
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

The more one learns about Organic Foods, the more one learns how to be a better consumer of foods and organic foods in particular. How has this changed your food buying habits? How do you feel about the nutritional value of Organic Foods vs. ‘Conventional’ Foods. Reports are put out by many sources from scientific to farmer. The scientists as you might have guess see no problem with “conventional foods” non organic foods as they supply the world with GMOs (genetically modified organisms) and the additives that we see in foods. Do you think food should be a scientific lab process or a biological process? Share your comments with the community by sharing them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Sierra Harvest

Sierra Harvest: Seeding Our Future

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Sierra Harvest
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Source: groworganic.com

Would you like Sierra Harvest at your children’s school? How can Sierra Harvest help you? Need help with starting your own garden? How can this change your eating habits? Will you allow yourself to eat and live healthier? Why not? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Black Men: Health

Healthy Eating / Black Male Health | American Black Journal Full Episode

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Black Male Health
Source: American Black Journal
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Are you a black male or know one? What did you learn about Whole Foods? How do the tips for black men’s health apply to all our health? Share your comments with the community by positing them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Michelle Obama: Nutrition

Did you know that obesity leads to health concerns? Did you know the Trump administration is trying to end the hard won Michelle and Barack Obama school nutrition Act for kids? How do you feel about your tax dollars being spent on good nutrition for your children? Share your comments with the community by positing them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Dick Gregory: Health

Comedian, Activist Dick Gregory Talks Health

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Dick Gregory, Food and Health
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

How do you choose a healthier diet when you feel that you can not afford it? How do you make the switch from more medicine to more healthier foods? What do you think about eating more fruits and vegetables than meats? Share your comments with the community by positing them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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GMO & your Health

Do GMOs harm health?

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GMO and Your Health
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Scientist are often responsible for creating GMOs and ‘food products’. Food occurs in nature naturally and can be cultivated from seeds. If all the food we eat are GMOs, food will cease to be grown in nature but looked at as products. This has health, financial and economical implications. Scientist created chemical pesticides that Organic Farmers state they do not need and are detrimental to food and food nutrition. Further Organic Farmers state that scientist are always pushing products farmers do not need making farming unsustainable and economically impossible unless farmers become industrial farmers. Industrial farmers are known for focusing on quantity and not quality: nutrition. The lack of nutrition in food is said to be the source of many health problems and concerns today. These very food production practices have Organic Farmers returning to the strength, health and nutrition found in food that focuses more on biology rather than science or medicine.

What do you think the profit is in GMOs? Do you think GMOs should be put on the market for sale before they know the effects of GMOs on humans? Do you think they should disclose the effects of GMOs to people similar to cigarette labels? Share your comments with the community by positing them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.