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DePaul Hospital’s Closing Presents a Unique Opportunity for Hampton Roads

Posted on January 29, 2021 by sherlockj

De Paul Medical Center Jan. 29, 2021. Photo Credit: James C. Sherlock
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

by James C. Sherlock
Source: Beacon Rebellion

Not too long ago, before the decline of the malls and COVID, the healthcare community coined what they called the Nordstrom Rule.

The meaning was that if you wished to optimize profits in your healthcare business, build it close to a Nordstrom. The theory was that Nordstrom had already done the market research to identify concentrations of wealthy customers.

I wrote yesterday about the Sisters of Charity and Bon Secours, Catholic charities both. The Sisters were not in it to serve wealthy patients. They purposely located their hospitals among the poor. So 19th and 20th century of them.

Sentara, a more sophisticated public charity, avoids locations close to the poor.

In 1991, Sentara purchased the Humana Bayside Hospital in Virginia Beach, renaming it Sentara Bayside Hospital. That cleansed Virginia Beach of a competitor. But Bayside served Virginia Beach’s largest concentration of economically disadvantaged minorities. So Sentara closed it at the first opportunity.

The Virginia Department of Health brokered the closing of Bayside in 2008 under the cover of the Certificate of Public Need (COPN) process that fatally wounded DePaul, allowing Sentara to relocate the Bayside beds to the new Sentara Princess Anne, far from the minority citizens of Bayside.

The closest hospital for many residents served by Bayside was then, you guessed it, DePaul. No longer.

More about that legendary and devastatingly unfair and anticompetitive COPN decision next time.

Today we’ll talk about the gleaming cornerstone of Sentara’s Hampton Roads monopoly, Norfolk General Hospital, and until now its only competitor in Norfolk and Virginia Beach, Bon Secours DePaul Hospital, which announced this week it was closing as an inpatient hospital and emergency room.

Sentara is now unopposed in the hospital markets of Virginia’s two largest cities. I hope the sommeliers at Sentara headquarters in Norfolk were prepared for the surge in demand.

DePaul Hospital 

If you drive near DePaul hospital, either you live there or DePaul is likely your destination.

The surrounding area is mostly low cost and assisted cost apartments, very small but neat working class houses and low end strip malls. Granby High School is there, as are a few churches and a synagogue, but those do not define the area. Economically disadvantaged families and DePaul Hospital do.

It is easy to see, if you know the history of the area, what the Sisters of Charity saw at the end of the Great Depression with the coming of WW II.

They saw the mass migration of tens of thousands of people, their personal fortunes ravaged by the Depression, moving to Norfolk seeking work in the expanding shipyards, naval bases and port. They built their new DePaul hospital to serve those workers where they were settling. DePaul opened in 1944 in a section of the city then about half white and half black between the Elizabeth River and Norfolk Naval Base.

Most patients of the new DePaul in 1944 could not pay, or could only pay a little if they had found those jobs, but that is what today we would call a feature not a bug to the Sisters. There was no Medicaid, no Medicare. Just the Sisters, their mission and the Catholic church that funded their efforts.

DePaul has failed for a number of reasons including in no particular order:

  • It was built to handle 600 inpatients and thus has an enormous infrastructure. A precipitous decline in inpatients crushed revenue, but did not reduce upkeep costs;
  • There has been a sharp decline of the Catholic donations that helped fund their work;
  • Underfunded Medicare and Medicaid programs, by policy, underpay for services. That triggers  providers of all types to seek payer mixes that feature as many privately insured patients as possible (the Nordstrom Rule);
  • Physicians desire to work and practice in state-of-the-practice facilities, which DePaul, a money-loser for many years, found it difficult to fully fund;
  • Rapid development of outpatient procedures, offset partially by the Commonwealth’s near banning through COPN of outpatient surgery centers not run by a hospital, that are less financially rewarding than the inpatient procedures they replaced;
  • The costs of medical technology –– including those constantly beeping machines and million-dollar robotic surgical assistants — are rising rapidly.
  • In Virginia, the Certificate of Public Need (COPN) program picks winners and losers. By official decision in 2008, the COPN process led by Virginia’s Health Commissioner rejected Bon Secours/DePaul bids to build hospitals in Virginia Beach and Suffolk necessary to secure their financial future in favor of virtually identical bids by Sentara. Game over — it just took 12 years to fully play out;
  • Those of us who live in this area watched the painfully long coup de grace. With Bon Secours fatally wounded by the 2008 COPN decision, Sentara moved to finish it off. It lured away Bon Secours physicians. It bought more physicians’ practices. Bon Secours built a cancer center at DePaul. Sentara moved to build a bigger one at Sentara Leigh campus in Norfolk, closer to the mother load of regional cancer patients in Virginia’s largest city, Virginia Beach.

It worked. DePaul as a hospital and emergency center is dead. COPN and Sentara together (which is perhaps an unnecessary qualifier) have a kill. The physicians practices that DePaul leaves behind in Norfolk have nowhere else to go but Sentara for hospital privileges.

Stuffing and mounting DePaul on the wall is the only thing that will escape them.

Norfolk General

The cornerstone of the Sentara empire, Norfolk General Hospital, in direct contrast to DePaul is located in the exact center of the money and power in Norfolk. A drive from DePaul to Norfolk General is a ride through nearly every level of economic success, starting among the poorest citizens and arriving at the doorsteps of Norfolk’s wealthiest and most powerful people.

Norfolk General’s gleaming towers overlook the Elizabeth River, the mansions of the Hague and Ghent, the Chrysler Museum, the Harrison Opera House — you get the idea.

I wager that few who live in that area could find DePaul Hospital on a map. The right people are not interested in such places. DePaul would certainly not make for proper conversation at Ghent cocktail parties. They are only woke to a point that the consequences do not reach their doors.

And yes, Nordstrom located its Norfolk emporium near Norfolk General Hospital 20 years ago. In this case, flipping the old saying, Sentara had already done the market research for Nordstrom.

An Opportunity

I am going to try to postpone the Sentara celebration by offering for consideration a use for the massive DePaul infrastructure.

I strongly recommend the sale or gift of the DePaul complex to either Mayo Clinic or Cleveland Clinic to serve as their mid-Atlantic campus.

A campus of a world-class health system will serve patients near DePaul but not depend upon the cash flows they generate. Such a facility, like every other Mayo and Cleveland Clinic campus, will be a huge draw for medical tourism. The property is just off I-64 and very close to the airport. The new tunnel will make access much quicker from the west.

Mayo and or/Cleveland Clinic may very well find this appealing if it is marketed and incentivized properly. It is what they do, and neither has a mid-Atlantic campus.

There are at least four distinct benefits to such a course of action for the Commonwealth and Hampton Roads:

  • It will serve both the people and the medical practitioners of Hampton Roads by raising the level of medical care here;
  • It will restore competition in the hospital industry in Hampton Roads;
  • It will revitalize the economy of Norfolk and South Hampton Roads; and
  • Sentara will hate it.

I hope the Governor, Virginia’s Health Commissioner (final decision authority on COPN), Norfolk’s Mayor and City Council and every politically-connected individual and interest group in Hampton Roads will get behind this effort.

They certainly owe us one.

We have seen the decline of patient center care and the rise of medical fraud in the pursuit of profit. What are your thoughts on DePaul Hospital closing? What do you think should happen? What is the economic impact of rising health care cost, medical fraud and declining health care outcomes on a community?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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Norfolk, VA Climate Change – NRDC

Source: National Resource Defense Council
Cities across the United States should anticipate significant water-related vulnerabilities based on current
carbon emission trends because of climate change, ranging from water shortages to more intense storms
and floods to sea level rise. To help cities become more resilient to the rising threats of climate change,
NRDC reviewed more than 75 scientific studies and other reports to summarize the water-related
vulnerabilities in 12 cities—including Norfolk. Although there may still be some uncertainty about what
particular impacts threaten cities and how quickly or severely they might occur, action at the local level
is the most effective method of reducing, mitigating, and preventing the negative effects of water-related
climate change outlined in this fact sheet. NRDC urges cities to prepare for coming challenges relating
to water resources. Fortunately, there are steps cities are already taking to become more resilient.

Norfolk and other areas in the Hampton Roads section of the lower Chesapeake Bay have garnered recent attention for flooding associated with a relatively rapid rate of sea level rise and land subsidence. These impacts put the vast infrastructure—including important naval bases—at risk. Based on climate research studying sea level rise and other impacts, we know Norfolk is vulnerable to:

Summary of water-related climate changes and impacts in Norfolk throughout the 21st century

  • Rising sea levels
  • Increased flooding
  • Increased annual precipitation
  • More frequent and intense storm events

Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding

The rate of annual sea level rise measured at Sewells Point in Norfolk is the highest of all stations along the U.S. East Coast—nearly 4.5 millimeters per year. Relative sea level in Norfolk has steadily risen 14.5 inches (0.37 meter) over the past 80 years and is projected to increase by another 1.3 to 5.2 feet (0.39 to 1.6 meters) by 2100. The land in Norfolk and the rest of Hampton Roads is subsiding for a combination of reasons, exacerbating the effect of sea level rise. Further, most of the city of Norfolk is at an elevation of only 5 meters or less with a very shallow slope, therefore flooding from sea level rise is likely to be a priority issue for the city in the 21st century. Indeed, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the Norfolk–Virginia Beach metropolitan area ranks 10th in the world in the value of assets exposed to increase flooding from sea level rise. Precipitation and Storm Events and Flooding Under both higher and lower emissions scenarios, an increase in both the overall annual precipitation and precipitation intensity is projected throughout the 21st century. Increased storm intensity will also affect storm surges in the area. The combination of storm surges and sea level rise is expected to lead to significant flooding by tropical storms and nor’easters that did not cause significant flooding in the past. For instance, Hurricane Isabel caused as much damage as the “storm of the century” 1933 Chesapeake- Potomac Hurricane had 70 years earlier, despite the fact that Isabel’s storm surge was almost 2 feet (0.6 meter) lower. More intense rainfall could also have water quality impacts such as increased runoff, which elevates bacteria and algae levels. Naval Impacts Norfolk’s economy relies heavily on maritime industries; the U.S. Navy provided direct economic impact of more than $14.6 billion in the Hampton Roads region in 2008. Norfolk is home to three major Navy facilities, as well as the Port of Virginia’s Norfolk International Terminal. All of these facilities are vulnerable to storm surge flooding. Temporary work stoppages or permanent transfer of these facilities because of flood damage could have a ripple effect on Norfolk’s economy. Increased Temperature Multi-model projections of annual average temperature suggest an increase of 3.1° to 3.8°F (1.7° to 2.1°C) for the Chesapeake Bay area by 2050, and 3.6° to 9°F (2° to

5 °C) of warming by 2100. The combination of increased nutrient pollution of Chesapeake Bay waters from more frequent rainfall events, higher dissolved carbon dioxide concentrations, and higher temperatures will lead to more frequent and intense blooms of algae. Action While Norfolk does not have a comprehensive plan for addressing climate change impacts, the city is currently working on an update to its general plan, plaNorfolk 2030, which will include climate change impact considerations such as sea level changes. To date, Norfolk’s flood mitigation work has largely been composed of ad hoc response strategies and minor improvements to and maintenance of the city’s 60-year-old drainage system, which was originally designed to handle smaller storms than what it is now handling. Moving forward, the city has taken the bold step of hiring the Dutch coastal engineering firm, Fugro, to conduct a citywide flood vulnerability analysis that will be used to enhance the city’s current flood mitigation program and inform the development of a robust, cost-effective program for the future. The city will utilize the flood forecast model to evaluate the costs associated with implementing various flood mitigation mechanisms and the economic damages avoided by installing these mechanisms.

© Natural Resources Defense Council July 2011 www.nrdc.org/policy

What you can do:

For more information, please contact:
Michelle Mehta
mmehta@nrdc.org
(310) 434 2300
switchboard.nrdc.org/
blogs/mmehta
www.nrdc.org/policy
www.facebook.com/nrdc.org
www.twitter.com/nrdc

Where are you located? What are the climate challenges in your area? How have you responded to them?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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Flash flooding closes roads after heavy rains soak Hampton Roads

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By ROBYN SIDERSKY and JESSICA NOLTE
Source: THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT |NOV 12, 2020 AT 9:32 AM
Feature Photo Source: Unsplash, Usgs Ugr

The National Weather Service issued a flash flood warning for much of Hampton Roads through Thursday night.

On the Peninsula, a flash flood watch was in effect until 6 p.m. in Hampton, Newport News, Poquoson, Isle of Wight, York County and James City County. A flood warning remained in effect until 8 p.m.

Heavy rain fell steadily Thursday morning, with 3-3.5 inches reported by 1 p.m. in Virginia Beach, according to the weather service. About 3-6 inches of rain had fallen on the Peninsula just before 4 p.m. causing road closures and flash flooding.

Hampton reported delays to trash and recycling pickup Thursday morning because vehicles had difficulty navigating flooded roads. Old Dominion University canceled in-person classes after 4 p.m.

Small creeks and streams, urban areas, highways, streets and underpasses are all affected by the flooding.

Virginia Beach announced Thursday afternoon that Bow Creek Recreation Center would be closed for the rest of the day because of flooded roads in the area.

The city reported road closures because of flooding in several areas including:

  • Dam Neck Road at Harpers Road
  • Dam Neck Road at Southcross Drive
  • Horn Point Road at Muddy Creek Road
  • Independence Blvd. South at Salem Road
  • Laskin Road at Hilltop Plaza Shopping Center
  • Potters Road at Air Station Drive
  • Princess Anne Road at Kempshire Lane
  • Red Mill Blvd. at Agecroft Road
  • S Rosemont Road at Country Club Road
  • Salem Road at Elbow Road
  • Salem Road at North Landing Road
  • Sandbridge Road
  • South Blvd. at Maidstone Circle
  • Sullivan Blvd. at Westgrove Road South
  • Wellsford Drive at Old Dam Neck Road

Virginia Beach also reported blocked roads in multiple places including:

  • 21st Street at Mediterranean Avenue
  • Barberton Drive at Old Virginia Beach Road
  • Deer Park Drive at Brookbridge Road
  • Dillon Drive at Continental Street
  • Edwin Drive at Gleneagle Drive
  • Edwin Drive at Masters Avenue
  • Gannet Run at Huntsman Drive
  • Greenwich Road between Newtown Road and Witchduck Road
  • Hannibal Street at Country Club Circle
  • Haygood Road at Perth Lane
  • Indian River Road New Bridge Road
  • Kings Lake Drive at Oxford Drive
  • Lakecrest Road at Riverbend Road
  • N Great Neck Road at Tanglewood Trail
  • Nanneys Creek Road at Charity Neck Road
  • New Bridge Road at Indian River Road
  • Oceana Blvd. at Bells Road
  • Princess Anne Road at Elson Green Avenue
  • Princess Anne Road at Holland Road
  • S Rosemont Road at Dahlia Drive
  • Sandbridge Road at Flanagans Lane
  • Sandbridge Road at Lotus Drive
  • Seaboard Road at County Place
  • Seaboard Road at Princess Anne Road
  • South Plaza Trail at Old Forge Road
  • Townfield Lane at Kerr Drive
  • Upton Drive at Nimmo Parkway
  • Upton Drive at Tennyson Road
  • Van Buren Drive at Presidential Blvd.

Portsmouth reported abandoned vehicles and flooding in several places including:

  • Frederick Boulevard from Turnpike Road to Deep Creek Boulevard
  • I-264 Ramps to Frederick Boulevard are closed in both directions
  • Airline Boulevard at the intersection with Victory Boulevard
  • Multiple locations along Elm Avenue and Effingham Street
  • Rodman Avenue at High Street
  • Rodman Avenue at King Street
  • Churchland Boulevard at Academy Avenue
  • Twin Pines Road at Towne Point Road
  • Virginia Avenue at Portland Street
  • Greenwood Drive at Deep Creek Boulevard
  • George Washington Highway at Elm Avenue

announced it would open the Middle and County street garages at 5 p.m. Thursday until 7 a.m. Friday for vehicles in low-lying areas.

Another half-inch or inch is possible across the region this afternoon, according to the weather service.

A flash flood warning means that flooding is imminent or occurring and if you’re in an area prone to flooding, it’s best to move to higher ground immediately.

The heavy rainfall is a result of an unseasonably moist air mass. The rain will taper off in the afternoon through late tonight.

This is a developing story. Check back to PilotOnline.com for updates.

Robyn Sidersky, 757-222-5117, robyn.sidersky@pilotonline.com

We have seen flooding in Norfolk before and will see it again. Rain harvesting and rain gardens are just 2 solutions to flooding. What are your solutions to flooding? What area are you in? What are the climate challenges in your area?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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Psychiatrist Sentenced to Prison for Healthcare Fraud Scheme – Norfolk, VA

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Thursday, January 16, 2020

Source: US Department of Justice
NORFOLK, Va. – A Virginia Beach doctor was sentenced today to 27 months in prison for defrauding Medicare, Medicaid, and Tricare, and other health care benefits programs out of hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Additionally, Udaya K. Shetty, 64, agreed to pay over $1 million to settle related civil claims.

According to court documents, was a licensed psychiatrist practicing medicine at his own practice, Behavioral & Neuropsychiatric Group. Beginning in 2013, Shetty created a scheme by which he could overbill healthcare benefit programs by seeing patients for only five to 10 minutes, but then billing for services that were on average 41 to 63 minutes long. Shetty instructed his staff to often double, triple, or even quadruple book appointment times. The fraud became apparent when investigators discovered that on dozens of instances Shetty would need more than 24 hours a day of working to perform the services for which he billed. 

In 2017, Shetty closed his own practice and joined another psychiatric practice, Quietly Radiant Psychiatric Services. While there Shetty, and one of his former employees, Mary Otto, engaged in a similar scheme. Although other Quietly Radiant staff members were responsible for billing, Shetty directed Otto to access the billing system and change all of his billing data to a higher billing rate.  Otto complied and changed the data without the knowledge of Quietly Radiant’s staff. As a result of their actions, Shetty and Otto defrauded various healthcare benefit programs of more than $450,000. Otto pled guilty for her role in the scheme and was sentenced to 15 months in prison on January 10.

In regards to the civil settlement, Shetty agreed to pay $1,078,000 to the United States and the Commonwealth of Virginia to resolve his liability under the False Claims Act and the Virginia Fraud Against Taxpayers Act for submitting or causing the submission of false claims to the Medicare, Medicaid, and TRICARE programs.

G. Zachary Terwilliger, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia; Martin Culbreth, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Norfolk Field Office; Robert E. Craig, Special Agent in Charge for the Defense Criminal Investigative Service’s (DCIS) Mid-Atlantic Field Office; Maureen R. Dixon, Special Agent in Charge of the Office of Inspector General for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS); and Mark R. Herring, Attorney General of Virginia, made the announcement after sentencing by U.S. District Judge Rebecca Beach Smith. Assistant U.S. Attorney Joseph L. Kosky prosecuted the criminal case. Assistant U.S. Attorney Clare P. Wuerker handled the civil case.

A copy of this press release is located on the website of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Virginia. Related court documents and information are located on the website of the District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia or on PACER by searching for Case No. 2:19-cr-089.

Some patients often start off with private health care and end up with Medicaid, Medicare or Tricare because these government health insurance or more advantageous for those medical ‘professionals’ seeking to defraud patients and insurance providers. Would you recognize health care fraud if you see it? What does it look like? Have you been a victim of health care fraud?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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Sea Level Rise in Norfolk, VA

Virginia Town Forced to Adapt to Rising Seas

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Sea Level Rise in Norfolk
Source: VOA
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Do you live in Norfolk, VA or Virginia? What have been your experiences with sea level rise? What would you like to see happen to mitigate sea level rise? Have you considered harvesting rain or creating a rain garden? Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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USA Today: Norfolk, VA Sea level Rise

Source: USA Today

How have you been impacted by sea level change in Norfolk, VA or where you are? When was the last time you were caught in a flood in Norfolk, VA? What can we do individual to impact sea level change and climate change / global warming?

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Echinacea at home

Echineaca Plant Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

As we shared with you earlier this week, we are down to one plant. All other plants have found a new home and echinacea was one of them. I want to think her new care taker for being so patient as I prepared her for her new home. Since we are in the midst of a pandemic, I would be remiss not to tell you that among many medicinal benefits echinacea (one of our most requested plants) is a great source for building one’s immune system. With many with pre-exiting conditions being hit hard by COVID 19, Dr Peoples recommend that one take immune boosters to maintain good health during the pandemic. So echinacea, although it will take some time to bloom, is especially significant today.

Learn more about how echinacea can ‘enhance‘ your immune system and its healing powers:

Thank you for sharing an update and pictures with us! As we can see she growing up big and tall. She will grow about 4 to 5 feet tall. Plant holders like you are sending in pictures and keeping us updated on their plants progress. You can too by emailing us at contact@shidonnaraven.com. We love to get your updates and glad good things are sprouting around Hampton Roads and helping to keep people in good health. Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

Bring home your own parsley plant

Parsley Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Parsley Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Can Norfolk go from Flooding to Harvest

Flooding at Tidewater Drive and Virginia Beach Blvd. in Norfolk

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
WAVY TV 10
Andy Fox reports
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Improve your community, environment and avoid water borne disease and molds. Save and start harvesting today:

If you live in Norfolk, VA, USA, you know it floods. And if you lived here long enough you are up to here with the flooding. Many residence having difficulty obtaining flood insurance which can be key to eliminating water borne diseases and mold from flooding. Do you think Norfolk can address the flooding? What problems have you faced with flooding? How can you prevent flooding? Yes, you! Stay tuned for information, news and resources on rain gardens and rain harvesting and how this can turn flood waters into a harvest: rain harvesting. Learn more about rain harvesting now by viewing our previous articles. Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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For your Mother

Marigold Plant Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

My neighbor’s mother has many flowers and plants adorning her yard. Her plants are huge, beautiful and well kept. So, when my neighbor saw this marigold he was immediately attracted to the marigold that had not yet sprouted. Since he first spotted her, she has grown up into a little plantling. She is in a pot with plenty of room to grow. Her leaves are short and complex blades stacked closely upon each other. Many flowers sport their foliage long before you every see a bloom collecting in the sun’s resources and feeding its growth so that it can bloom. As we stated earlier this week, the last of our container plants went out this week to homes across the Hampton Roads area. This marigold was one of the last ones to be delivered this week. We are expecting beautiful things out of her. There are many varieties of marigolds so this one promises to be different from what you typically see.

We feel in love with marigold when we saw her because she was a much needed solution to our persistent ant problem. True to our organic goals we did not use any chemicals to manage the ant problem but strategically placed marigolds around the garden and in time our ant problem dwindled down to not visible. But, just because they are not visible does not mean they are not there. Nonetheless, it resolved our ant problems more than once. In fact, we sent one of these plants home to a neighbor’s house as a companion plant. The dill plant we sent to our neighbors house was covered in plants, so we sent the marigold over also. The ants soon disappeared.

Parsley Plant Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Parsley Plant Shidonna Raven Garden and Cooks

Have you ever given someone flowers as a gift? Were they living: a plant? What are the benefits of giving flower plants as gifts rather than cut flowers? Consider our last plant: parsley as a gift for someone special. She has harvested consistently and is doing great. She is a flat leaf parsley plant packing a punch of flavor. Share your comments with the community by positing them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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COVID 19, Going Back to School in Norfolk, VA

Diet & Health Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

While many primary school districts, and secondary schools for that matter, struggle with mixed, hard and fast rules and funding about going back to school, many schools were left scrambling to create systems, training and provide equipment for students on short notice in the wake of a pandemic that still lacks a national plan other than what many medical professionals call an unrealistic time frame for having a vaccine: January 2021. Many medical professionals feel that March 2021 is a more realistic deadline. Amidst all this our elected officials in Norfolk, VA have decided to start 100% online for Norfolk, VA primary schools. Many secondary schools will also be online (in Norfolk, VA). Many schools are hoping to switch back to in person at some point but many of these deadlines remain up in the air as we wade through the pandemic. Our elected officials were prompt in addressing the digital divide that exists by providing chrome books for those families in need, ensuring that students are equipped to go back to school. It was very important to Congressman Bobby Scott that students have chrome books and were equipped to learn this school season during the pandemic.

Don’t get caught off guard. Going Back to School During COVID-19: A SIMPLE GUIDE:

In fact, many teachers instructing primary school students have begun to venture out seeking their own computers. Teachers often are left to supply themselves, their classes and sometimes their students with supplies on their modest salaries. The elected officials in Norfolk, VA had approved teacher raises. In the face of the pandemic they have been put back in a position to fight for this raise for teachers as many states have been left to address the pandemic, in a sense, on their own, although many of our fine states have sought to pull and work together. Make sure your voice is heard this November at the ballot box and contact your local office of election with any questions or concerns. Plan ahead and Vote early!

Do you have children in either primary or secondary school? Are you a teacher on the front line like some of our friends and family? How are you preparing for this school season? Share your comments with the community by positing them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.