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COVID 19 and Vitamin D

10 Vitamin D–Rich Foods to Add to Your Diet

Source: Everyday Health

Fish, mushrooms, and several fortified foods can help you get your fix of the Sunshine Vitamin.

Sheryl Huggins Salomon

By Sheryl Huggins Salomon
Medically Reviewed by Kelly Kennedy, RD
Last Updated: December 17, 2019

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Source: Everyday Health
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Tuna, swordfish, and salmon are all good sources of vitamin D.

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Are you getting enough vitamin D in your diet? This nutrient is important for growing healthy cells, keeping your immune system humming to ward off illness, and aiding in calcium absorption so your bones stay strong. It also helps prevent the bone disease rickets in children, and with calcium, the so-called Sunshine Vitamin can help guard against osteoporosis in older adults, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) notes.

Vitamin D is produced in your body when the sun’s ultraviolet rays hit your skin, and the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of vitamin D is 600 international units (IU), which is 15 micrograms (mcg) for most adults, according to the NIH. For those older than 80, the RDA is 800 IU (20 mcg).

Yet most people don’t get enough vitamin D via sunlight, nor is food a good source of the nutrient, says Lori Zanini, RD, a Los Angeles–based dietitian.

People typically don’t exceed 288 IU per day from diet alone. Even if you drink milk fortified with vitamin D, 8 fluid ounces (oz) has only 100 IU — one-sixth the amount that you need daily. No wonder 41.6 percent of Americans have a vitamin D deficiency, per a study. A vitamin D deficiency means you have 20 nanograms per milliliter or less of the nutrient in your blood. If you are nonwhite, obese, or do not have a college education, you may be at greater risk for being vitamin D deficient. Your healthcare provider can test your blood to find out for sure.

To get your fix, you can opt for supplements. Zanini recommends vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol), which is found in animal sources of food and is generally better absorbed in the body, though plant-derived vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) is used in supplements as well. Yet research is mixed on whether vitamin D supplements offer concrete health benefits. Authors of a study published in January 2019 in The New England Journal of Medicine theorized that there is a reduced cancer risk for African Americans who take vitamin D supplements, as well as a significantly lower death rate in people with cancer who take them. But major studies published recently, including an October 2018 review in The Lancet, have not shown benefits from supplementation, despite prior hype about it.

“Getting vitamin D from food is a priority,” says Zanini. Make sure your diet is rich in the following fare, so you can increase your intake.1

Sockeye Salmon Is a Source of Protein

Salmon high in vitamin d
Source: Everyday Health
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Not only is salmon a great option if you’re looking for protein to add to your diet but it’s also rich in the Sunshine Vitamin. According to the NIH, 3 oz of cooked sockeye salmon has about 447 IU of vitamin D. “In addition to vitamin D, salmon is a great addition to anyone’s diet, with it also being a good source of healthy protein and omega-3 fatty acids,” says Zanini. According to the NIH, fish offer two critical omega-3s: eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, which you must get through food. Omega-3s help keep your immune, pulmonary, endocrine, and cardiovascular systems healthy.

Add sockeye salmon to your dinner rotation with this flavorful Dijon-based recipe. Other cold-water fatty fish, like mackerel and sardines, also have similarly high levels of vitamin D, per the NIH.

Enjoy Swordfish — in Moderation

a plate of swordfish which is a source of vitamin d
Source: Everyday Health
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Swordfish is another favorite of Zanini’s. Three cooked ounces provide 566 IU per serving, which nearly gets you to your daily recommended intake of vitamin D, according to the NIH. “The American Heart Association [AHA] recommends eating at least two servings of fish per week, and this fish is versatile and tasty,” she adds. The AHA advises children and pregnant women to avoid large fish, such as swordfish, because they have higher levels of mercury contamination than smaller, less long-lived species. Yet the health benefits for older adults in particular outweigh the risks, according to the organization.

Try swordfish in kebabs complete with onions, green bell peppers, mushrooms, and cherry tomatoes.3

Canned Tuna Packs More Than 25 Percent of Your Daily Goal

Canned Tuna high in vitamin d
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According to the NIH, 3 oz of canned tuna in water contains 154 IU of vitamin D. The affordable cupboard staple is great for easy lunches like a classic tuna sandwich or tuna salad.

Put a healthy twist on the deli favorite with this artichoke and ripe-olive tuna salad recipe. Or include it on your dinner plate with a delicious comfort food meal like healthy tuna casserole with rigatoni. “Tuna is accessible and affordable, making it a great option for anyone,” says Zanini.

Eat Mushrooms for a Versatile Vitamin D Punch

Baked Veggie-Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms From The Gluten-Free Vegetarian Family Cookbook
Source: Everyday Health
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While mushrooms don’t naturally offer a high amount of vitamin D, some are treated with UV light, providing a larger dose of the nutrient as a result. The vitamin D amounts will vary depending on the amount of UV light the mushrooms are exposed to, according to the Agricultural Research Service. A serving has between 124 and 1,022 IU per 100 grams (g).

Growers such as Monterey Mushrooms produce varieties high in vitamin D, but you have to read the labels. Once you have them, add sautéed mushrooms to eggs or fish for a meal even richer in vitamin D. Or make a more substantial mushroom dish, such as veggie-stuffed portobellos.5

Fortified Milk Offers a Double Whammy: Vitamin D and Calcium

Fortified Milk high in vitamin d
Source: Everyday Health
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In addition to being an excellent source of calcium, 8 fluid ounces (fl oz) of milk has between 115 and 124 IU of vitamin D, the NIH notes. Be sure to check the label of your favorite brand for the exact amount. Fortified plant-based milks, such as soy and almond, can provide similar amounts of vitamin D, as well.

Enjoy a cold 8 oz glass of your preferred fortified milk straight up, blend it into a smoothie, or use it to whip up your choice of coffee drink.

RELATED: 9 Best and Worst Milks for Your Cholesterol Levels6

Fortified Orange Juice Can Give You a Healthy Start to the Day

Fortified Orange Juice high in vitamin d
Source: Everyday Health
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One cup (8 fl oz) of fortified orange juice can add up to 137 IU of vitamin D to your daily total, though the NIH recommends checking the label for exact numbers because counts can vary. Serve a glass of OJ with breakfast or use it in this mango-strawberry smoothie recipe, a delicious and portable morning meal. Keep in mind that it’s generally healthiest to enjoy whole fruit rather than its juice form, since the former still contains filling fiber, so drink juice in moderation. If you have a health condition for which you need to watch your carbohydrate and sugar intake, such as diabetes, it may be best to get your vitamin D from another source. Work with your healthcare team to figure out how much, if any, OJ is right for your diet.7

Fortified Yogurt Makes for a Gut-Healthy Snack

Fortified yogurt high in vitamin d
Source: Everyday Health
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Yogurt is a convenient, tasty snack — and when consumed plain or with fresh fruit, it’s healthy, too. This type of dairy is an excellent source of good-for-the-gut probiotics, and reaching for a fortified variety will knock off between 10 and 20 percent of your daily requirement of vitamin D, depending on the brand. Many fortified varieties are flavored (meaning they’re likely to be sugar bombs), so read the nutrition label to find out what you’re getting. The AHA recommends a max of 9 teaspoons (tsp) or 26 g of added sugar for men per day and a max of 6 tsp or 25 g of added sugar for women per day.

Try cooking a meal with plain yogurt for a vitamin D–enhanced entrée: This Middle Eastern–style chopped vegetable salad includes greens, herbs, and grains and also uses a cup of plain yogurt. It is a cooling alternative to a hot dish.

RELATED: Eat These 3 Foods for a Healthy Gut8

Cereal Can Be Fortified With Vitamin D, and Oatmeal Offers Fiber

Fortified Cereal and Oatmeal
Source: Everyday Health
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A packet of unsweetened, fortified oatmeal can add a solid dose of vitamin D to your diet. Ready-to-eat fortified cereal typically gives you 40 IU of vitamin D per serving, per the NIH, but it may provide more if you choose a more heavily fortified cereal, like Raisin Bran, which has 60.2 IU per cup, notes the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Fortified cereal can be a solid base for a nutrient-rich, high-fiber meal — especially if you add fortified low-fat or fat-free milk to your bowl for an extra 60 IU per half cup. Or you can be more adventurous and make a breakfast cookie that includes both fortified cereal and vitamin D–fortified margarine.9

Eggs Contain Protein and Immunity-Boosting Benefits

eggs which are a source of vitamin d
Source: Everyday Health
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Egg yolks have historically gotten a bad rap for raising levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, as Harvard Health Publishing notes. But skipping them in favor of egg whites means you’ll miss out on some of the protein and several of the minerals in yolks, such as zinc and selenium, which play a role in boosting your immune system. And you’ll miss out on vitamin D, too. One egg yolk has 41 IU, 10 percent of your daily value, per the NIH. Enjoy them in moderation.

RELATED: 7 Ways to Boost Your Immune System for Cold and Flu Season10

Sardines Give You Calcium, Omega-3s, and Protein

a plate of sardines which are high in vitamin d
Source: Everyday Health
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Buying fresh fish can be pricey. If that’s holding you back, give canned sardines a try. They’re more affordable than other forms of fish and are high in protein, heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, calcium, and vitamin D. Two sardines from a can offer 46 IU of the vitamin, or 12 percent of your daily value, according to the NIH. The underrated fish works well on top of salads, as well as in pasta sauces and stews.

As recommended in Monday’s article of this week, Vitamin D is an important vitamin that most people do not get enough of. It also boost one’s immune system, which is recommended for preventing COVID 19. So this article is all about foods that can help you get the vitamin D you need in your diet in addition to the sun. How has this article helped you? How can it improve your health? How can you introduce it to your diet? Healthy is the New Normal.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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Preventing COVID 19 by eating our Sockeye Salmon & Kale Salad

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In the mist of COVID 19 we are bringing you our Sockeye Salmon & Kale Salad to help you prevent contracting COVD 19 and the spread of COVID 19. As recommended in our article for this week on Monday, eating vitamin D rich foods will help boost your immune system to help you fight off disease. Kale, Egg, Sockeye Salon are all rich in vitamin D and are included in our salad. Make this salad apart of your immune system boosting diet plan and stay health while we combat the coronavirus. Health is the New Normal.

Sockeye Solmon & Kale Salad

Prep Time 30 mins
Serves 3 – 4
By Shidonna Raven

  • Cooked Filet of Sockeye Salmon
  • 1 Medium Bunch of Kale
  • 2 Boiled Eggs
  • 1/2 Cup Walnuts or Pinenuts
  • 1/2 Cup Feta Cheese
  • 1/4 Purple Onion
  • 20 Cherry Tomatoes

Wash and cut kale thinly. Drain and place in serving salad bowl. Cut cherry tomatoes in half. Add them to the salad. Slice 1/4 of a purple onion thinly into rings. Add to the salad. Cut boiled eggs as you desire and add to the salad. Sprinkle nuts and feta over salad. Crumble Sockeye Salmon over salad. Drizzle salad with vinaigrette.

What other ways can you change your diet to address the current pandemic? What measures do you take to prevent COVID 19? What other foods are healing foods that address your health needs?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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How to Celebrate Memorial Day

As COVID 19 lingered on, it left many of us with more questions than answers. Finally we could see the number of deaths begin to slow. While COVID 19 seemed to sweep the world in a matter of weeks brining things to a halt in the United States, we finally began to receive reports that we were effectively slowing the spread of COVID 19. While there is neither vaccine nor cure in sight yet, we could gather some satisfaction from the fact that things were beginning to work in slowing the spread of the virus. As we entered phase one of reopening and things seem to be returning to normal, in the back of our minds we know that things will inevitable not be the same. COVID 19 has caused us to rethink many things. How we work, socialize, shop and celebrate just to name a few. Many of us are sporting hair styles and facial hair that was totally different a few months ago because barber shops and salons are closed to the public.

As things reopen, we wonder what the new normal will be. We believe healthy will be the new normal. While many communities such as the African American and elderly communities got hit the hardest because of pre existing health conditions, many are left grappling with the fact that preexisting health conditions make them susceptible to disease and illness. So, one must reconsider having preexisting conditions at all and rethink how they define healthy. Preexisting health conditions cannot simply be left to linger. If we allow illness to linger, than we are not the fittest and many of them did not survive this pandemic.

Memorial Day is a day to celebrate those who have fallen in the line out duty. It is a time to gather and often eat. Many people have cookouts during this time. With Memorial Day just around the corner many of us are wondering just how to celebrate Memorial Day. The Military is huge in a town home to the largest Naval Base in the United States (Norfolk, Virginia), so is Memorial Day. While we are still in phase one of reopening, gatherings are still limited to just 10 people and we still have to be cognizant of the fact that COVID 19 can remain on surfaces for hours to days.

While we highly recommend following all the recommended and enforced guidelines, we recently had a cook out without any issue. Our gathering was about seven people and we were highly organized and clean when we cooked out. So, we believe that you can still celebrate Memorial Day with a traditional cookout but just on a small or smaller scale. You might have to forgo any traditions of fireworks or events with large gatherings as they are still being discouraged.

COVID 19 has caused many people to rethink how they stay connected and socialize with many people making use of software such as zoom and Google hangout. What are ways that you can celebrate and acknowledge Memorial Day here with us? What is your favorite salad recipe? Submit it via a comment or email it to us. Share your recipe with the community. How can you make your favorite recipes organic recipes? Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep growing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.