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Researchers find correlation between consistent mask-wearing and improved well-being

Source: News Medical Life Sciences
Dec 24 2020

Since the emergence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), universal masking has been implemented in many countries.

Wearing face masks or coverings can help reduce the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission by preventing infectious respiratory droplets from COVID-19 positive individuals from spreading to others when they sneeze, cough, talk, or breathe.

A team of researchers at the University of Edinburgh, UK, found that consistent mask-wearing was associated with positive well-being among their participants.

Study: Face covering adherence is positively associated with better mental health and wellbeing: a longitudinal analysis of the CovidLife surveys. Image Credit: r.classen / ShutterstockStudy: Face covering adherence is positively associated with better mental health and wellbeing: a longitudinal analysis of the CovidLife surveys. Image Credit: r.classen / Shutterstock
Source: News Medical Life Sciences

The study, published on the pre-print medRxivserversurveyed more than 11,000 participants across the UK.

Face covering

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends wearing a face mask as part of a comprehensive strategy of mitigating the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. The use of a mask alone is not sufficient to provide adequate protection, but it is effective along with other infection control measures.

The health agency also recommends that people wear a mask if they are around other people. When wearing the mask properly, it should cover the nose, mouth, and chin.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) urge the public to wear face coverings made with cloth. Surgical and medical masks are intended for healthcare workers. This is to avoid depleting the supply of this medical equipment, which is crucial in protecting frontline workers.

The study

The team conducted longitudinal analyses that collected data via the Qualtrics platform between April and June 2020. To arrive at the study findings, the researchers recruited 11,000 participants across the UK who completed the CovidLife surveys, which is an initiative set up by the University of Edinburgh to try and measure and understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the nation’s health and well-being. Using this data, the mental health outcomes of the participants were then evaluated.

The researchers found that adherence to face-covering guidelines had no association with poorer mental health. The team also found that people who wore masks consistently had better mental health than those who did not.

Hence, the study offers evidence to suggest that wearing face coverings or masks more often will not negatively impact mental health.

The study found that the odds of feeling anxious were 58% lower among those who always wore their masks. The likelihood of experiencing depressive symptoms was 25% lower among people who wore their masks most of the time. Lastly, the odds of feeling lonely were 67% lower among those who always wore their masks.

Indeed, the opposite appears to be the case: stronger adherence to guidelines is associated with less anxiety and loneliness, and higher life satisfaction and wellbeing,” the researchers wrote in the paper.

They also emphasized that wearing face masks alone is insufficient in preventing infection with SARS-CoV-2. Adhering to infection control measures such as washing the hands regularly, maintaining social distance, and avoiding crowded places are crucial factors that should be applied alongside face coverings.

Conclusion

Our data provide strong evidence that following government guidance on face coverings is associated with better rather than poorer mental health and wellbeing,” the team concluded.

Correlation is not to be conflated with causation here. However, the study offers an interesting finding which, the researchers believe, provides evidence that challenges assumptions that consistent mask-wearing can negatively impact mental health and well-being. They thus suggest that their findings “could be an important motivator for continued advocacy by policymakers and adherence by members of the public.”

More research would be needed to fully understand this correlation and it should be weighed up against the ways in which consistent mask-wearing can have negative effects on one’s physical and mental well-being. In short, further study would clarify the implications of this finding.

*Important Notice

medRxiv publishes preliminary scientific reports that are not peer-reviewed and, therefore, should not be regarded as conclusive, guide clinical practice/health-related behavior, or treated as established information.Journal reference:

  • Altschul, D., Ritchie, C., Kwong, A., Hartley, L., Nangle, C., Edwards, R. et al. (2020). Face covering adherence is positively associated with better mental health and wellbeing: a longitudinal analysis of the CovidLife surveys. medRxiv. doi.

The study findings agree with past studies that found that not adhering to the rule of wearing face masks can be viewed negatively by others. It reveals the other side to adherence behavior, even though stigmatization or discomfort of wearing masks do or do not harm mental health and well-being.

Angela Betsaida B. Laguipo, BSNBy Angela Betsaida B. Laguipo, BSN
Angela Betsaida B. Laguipo

Angela is a nurse by profession and a writer by heart. She graduated with honors (Cum Laude) for her Bachelor of Nursing degree at the University of Baguio, Philippines. She is currently completing her Master’s Degree where she specialized in Maternal and Child Nursing and worked as a clinical instructor and educator in the School of Nursing at the University of Baguio.

Do you wear masks to prevent COVID? What do you do to prevent the spread of COVID? Why? Why not?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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COVID 19 Cases on the Rise: Your States Stats

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Source: Wavy 10 – Norfolk, VA, USA
WASHINGTON (NEXSTAR) — As coronavirus cases in the United States climb towards another peak, new daily cases have reached their highest point yet in 17 states, according to the New York Times.

On Thursday, new confirmed cases climbed over the 65,000 mark — a total the country hasn’t seen since the end of July. Additionally, we’re seeing cases rise in more than 45 states, according to a Times tracking tool.

The U.S. leads the world with 7.9 million coronavirus cases and some 217,000 confirmed deaths. Globally, there have been 39 million reported cases and 1.09 million confirmed deaths.Pfizer coronavirus vaccine won’t be available before Election Day, CEO confirms.

As the nation experiences a 25% increase in confirmed cases, here’s a look at the states that are seeing the highest percentage increases in COVID-19 cases:

States seeing case increases (by percentages):

  • New Mexico – Average of 457 cases per day, an increase of 123 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Vermont – Average of nine cases per day, an increase of 110 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New Hampshire – Average of 78 cases per day, an increase of 101 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Montana – Average of 611 cases per day, an increase of 91 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Connecticut – Average of 326 cases per day, an increase of 80 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Indiana – Average of 1,655 cases per day, an increase of 66 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Wyoming – Average of 183 cases per day, an increase of 65 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Alaska – Average of 193 cases per day, an increase of 64 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Rhode Island – Average of 199 cases per day, an increase of 63 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Arizona – Average of 763 cases per day, an increase of 59 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Colorado – Average of 894 cases per day, an increase of 57 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Michigan – Average of 1,483 cases per day, an increase of 56 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Nebraska – Average of 767 cases per day, an increase of 55 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • North Dakota – Average of 610 cases per day, an increase of 54 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Ohio – Average of 1,654 cases per day, an increase of 53 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • South Dakota – Average of 653 cases per day, an increase of 50 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Mississippi – Average of 760 cases per day, an increase of 49 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Illinois – Average of 3,069 cases per day, an increase of 48 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Virginia – Average of 1,058 cases per day, an increase of 42 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Pennsylvania – Average of 1,362 cases per day, an increase of 39 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Tennessee – Average of 1,870 cases per day, an increase of 38 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Idaho – Average of 660 cases per day, an increase of 37 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • North Carolina – Average of 1,943 cases per day, an increase of 36 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New Jersey – Average of 835 cases per day, an increase of 35 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • West Virginia – Average of 251 cases per day, an increase of 33 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Nevada – Average of 587 cases per day, an increase of 30 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New York – Average of 1,329 cases per day, an increase of 29 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Washington – Average of 659 cases per day, an increase of 29 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Minnesota – Average of 1,312 cases per day, an increase of 28 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Kentucky – Average of 980 cases per day, an increase of 27 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Missouri – Average of 1,916 cases per day, an increase of 27 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Wisconsin – Average of 3,124 cases per day, an increase of 25 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Utah – Average of 1,216 cases per day, an increase of 23 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Alabama – Average of 1,027 cases per day, an increase of 21 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Oregon – Average of 345 cases per day, an increase of 21 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Massachusetts – Average of 663 cases per day, an increase of 20 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Kansas – Average of 788 cases per day, an increase of 19 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Florida – Average of 2,711 cases per day, an increase of 18 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Oklahoma – Average of 1,182 cases per day, an increase of 16 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Georgia – Average of 1,409 cases per day, an increase of 14 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Iowa – Average of 1,044 cases per day, an increase of 13 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • South Carolina – Average of 907 cases per day, an increase of 13 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Arkansas – Average of 911 cases per day, an increase of 11 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Maryland – Average of 589 cases per day, an increase of 11 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Texas – Average of 4,587 cases per day, an increase of 8 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Louisiana – Average of 543 cases per day, an increase of 7 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Delaware – Average of 125 cases per day, an increase of 5 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • California – Average of 3,285 cases per day, an increase of 2 percent from the average two weeks earlier.

States seeing case decreases (by percentages):

  • Hawaii – Average of 89 cases per day, a decrease of 17 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Maine – Average of 28 cases per day, a decrease of 9 percent from the average two weeks earlier.

Just when we think we are coming out of this pandemic and we struggle to get back to normal after the economic crisis that came along with the pandemic, we see many states still struggling with COVID 19 cases Norfolk, VA, USA included. While our cases continue to fluctuate our state is not one of the states that was hit the hardest by COVID 19 cases. We took a cautious and measured approach and it paid dividends. In fact as factors, such as going back to school and mere weather change, now have to be factored in, some of the European countries that were fairing better in the crisis are now seeing new and emerging struggles with COVID 19. COVID 19 has definitely taken its place in history. What solutions have worked well for your state? How are people adjusting to having to spend more times in doors, which has lead to less social distancing, due primarily to weather change and an increase in COVID 19 cases across the globe? What are you winter plans and how do you plan to maintain social distancing measures and keep your immune system strong? Remember, healthy is the New Normal! States such as Hawaii and California may likely fair better than other states like New York and Vermont where citizens will be forced to spend more time indoors in the warmth bracing against the cold winter weather while Hawaii and California can still take advantage of the fresh circulating air outdoors and easier means of social distancing.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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Tips for developing your own re-opening plan

covid 19 shidonna raven garden and cook

With all the conflicting information and no national plan for COVID 19 overall including reopening, what does one do. That is an excellent question. Many states have had to develop their own plans in lieu of a national plan. Some states have been more successful than others. We can only offer recommendations to you during this time with the little we know about this pandemic and how it has been handled in the US. The following are a couple of tips to help you navigate re -opening:

  • Do your homework before venturing into a space not your home
    • what cleaning measures do they have in place
    • what population controls do they have in place (do they ask if you have traveled outside the US in the last 14 days, etc.)
    • what protection measures do they have in place (i.e. face mask required, screening of staff, etc.)
  • Tour the location or facilities prior when possible
  • Plan how you will interact in the environment (are there more locations that have space for what you want to do than others)
  • Take as much space as you can: 6 feet and more
  • Take your own precautions (i.e. wear a proper mask, take immune system boosting vitamins, etc.)
  • Have an alternative plan (if you don’t feel comfortable at your old gym, exercise at home for instance)
  • Be patient
  • Stay abreast of COVID 19 news
  • Get the facts not the hype
  • Be resourceful
  • Carry your own cleaning and sanitizing supplies
  • Carry extra disposable masks. Don’t get into mask fights. Offer a mask as a courtesy.
  • Above all stay health and stay safe!

What COVID 19 precautions do you take? How do you manage your health or pre-existing conditions at this time? Do you know anyone who has been infected by COVID 19? Share your comments with the community by positing them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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The U.S. has had more coronavirus cases than some countries have people

BY CAITLIN O’KANE

AUGUST 10, 2020 / 4:14 PM / CBS NEWS

The United States has more coronavirus cases than many countries have people. With over 5 million confirmed cases, more people have been infected in the U.S. than the total population of places like Ireland, New Zealand, Panama, Croatia, Jamaica and numerous other countries. 

The U.S. has had more confirmed cases and more deaths from the virus than any nation in the world, with over 163,000 lives lost in the U.S. (Several other countries had a higher death rate per capita, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.)

California and Florida have each had over half a million cases, while the totals in New York and Texas aren’t far behind. However, New York — a major hotspot early in the pandemic — has managed to “flatten the curve” and reduce the spread of the virus, even as numbers keep climbing in many other states.

3097-state-hotspots.jpg
Source and photo: CBS News
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Cases spiked in Texas and Florida in July, and cases are continuing to rise in at least 11 states. According to data from Johns Hopkins University, Florida, Texas, California, Georgia and Louisiana saw the biggest daily increases on August 9.  

The total number of deaths from coronavirus in the U.S. could hit 300,000 by the end of 2020, according to Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former head of the Food and Drug Administration. 

“We’re definitely going to be somewhere between 200,000 and 300,000,” Gottlieb said in an interview with CBS News’ “Face the Nation” Sunday. “Whether we’re closer to 200,000 or closer to 300,000 depends on what we do and how this evolves.”

He said he’s concerned that another wave of the pandemic “could start to infect more rural communities that have largely been untouched to date and probably are a little bit more complacent because they have been untouched, but are still very vulnerable because the infection hasn’t been there.” 

Dr. Deborah Birx, a top White House health adviser, voiced similar concerns last week when she said the virus is has entered a “new phase” and is now “extraordinarily widespread” in rural areas.

Many of the states where the virus is now surging have resisted requiring face masks, even though health experts now believe wearing a mask is one of the most effective ways to slow the spread, along with social distancing and hand-washing. And some states that rushed to reopen later had to reimpose restrictions as cases flared up.

Clearly the US has a long way to go before COVID 19 is at least managed properly while we wait for a vaccine. How do you feel about being out in public? How do you feel about havng to go back to work? Do you feel public health has been made a priority? Share your comments with the community by positing them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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COVID 19 and Venturing Out

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Indeed COVID 19 made the world stand still in many respects. Many states and many countries started opening back up again a few months ago. The United States was among many. Unlike many other ‘developed’ nations the United States remains the leader in COVID 19 cases. We would like to think of ourselves as global leaders, however, this is not quit what was meant by that. Some were eager to re open as closing contributed to the economic hardship of many and caused several businesses large and small to close their doors for good. Nonetheless, venturing out has not been easy as states all over, such as Florida, continue to struggle with spikes in COVID 19 cases. Many states as Governor Northam said, were left to fight a biological war by themselves. Indeed, states were left without a true and clear national COVID 19 plan.

For the most part, we stay home as much as we can. We wear our masks and practice social distancing among other precautions. We have begun to venture out slowly to some of our old routines. In the spirit of good health: the gym is one of them. We first visited our old gym, re toured the facility, and reviewed their COVID 19 health measures. We mapped out our return and exercise plan. After asking a few follow up questions and getting a lay of the ‘new’ land so to speak we started back our old exercise regimen and have begun to work on our physical fitness again: what we believe is one of the 3 pillars of overall health (exercise, health (being disease free) and diet.

Have you begin to venture out? What do you do to stay safe from COVID 19? Will you take the vaccine when it comes out? Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Protecting against COVID19

What You Need To Know About Handwashing

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COVID 19 Protections – Basics
Source: CDC
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There is still a lot to learn about COVID 19. Russia recently approached WHO (World Health Organization) regarding putting a COVID 19 vaccine through their tests and certifications. Many companies and organizations are working on a solution to COVID 19, so we hope that a solution is not far off. In the mean time lets be certain about some CDC (Center for Disease Control) basics that are helping to prevent the spread of COVID. What are some best practices you implement daily to protect yourself and others from COVID 19? Do you wear a mask? Do you boost your immune system? Share your comments with the community by posting below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Using Face Masks Properly

Medical and fabric masks: who wears what when?

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Proper Face Mask Use
Source: WHO (World Health Organization)
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

With everyone across the globe being impacted in some form or fashion by COVID 19, masks have become apart of our daily wardrobe. In some cases, like in Norfolk, VA, USA, masks are required to enter some establishments. This video by the WHO educates us on the proper way to use and wear our masks to prevent the spread of COVID. How often do you go out in public? Where do you keep your mask? Do you wear a mask daily? Do you know of anyone not impacted by COVID 19? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.