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Keeping Cayenne Coming

cayenne pepper Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Staked "Korean Lettuce" Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

We know a few of you are like us: you like it hot. So, when it was discovered that we had cayenne pepper in the garden, it was welcomed. We have our first fruits from our cayenne plant. We recently had to stake our “Korean Lettuce” plant, as described by one of the staff at the international market where we picked the seeds up from, because it was growing more vertical and in the way of the cayenne plant. The cayenne plant has put out a lot of leaves probably to grow from under the canopy of the “Korean Lettuce”, so we finally staked her today to get her to grow more upright and to stop her canopy from growing over the cayenne plant. We hope to get more peppers from the cayenne plant now that we have done this.

Our “Korean Lettuce” is also sporting some beautiful flowers. This is typically a sign that a plant is either about to bear fruit or die. We were not sure what to make of our “Korean Lettuce” because the directions were all in Korean and we had so little information to go on. So, we planted her anyway and have kept a close eye on her. Since it is suppose to be a lettuce like plant we are really not expecting any vegetables from her. So, we clipped a few leaves as if to harvest. But, once they have flowered then they seed and die because the plant has not been harvested and it feels its cycle is ended. So, we shall see what happens to this plant. Stay tuned for updates. Have you begun your own garden like several others? What do you think of the Wilson Victory Garden and the gardens that several people have started in the wake of the COVID 19 pandemic? Does a garden seem more useful than ever? Michelle Obama had a garden before there was a pandemic. Some people are just ahead of their time!


Cayenne Plant Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Cayenne Plant Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

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Harvesting & Growing Radishes

Korean Radish Flower Shidonna Raven
Harvesting & Growing Radishes
Source: Almanac.com
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Several months ago we took a trip to our local international food market where we sourced a few Korean seeds. Although we had no idea what they were, we grabbed several. Regardless, a staff member at the store was able to give us some basic information regarding the seeds and how to prepare them. Of course we want to eat them! Our Korean Radishes have flowers that are in full boom. We have a few root plants such as carrots. We were wondering how do you know when they are ready if they are underground? God is indeed perfect in all his ways. When the roots are ready the tops will peek above ground. How many varieties do you think there are? Have you ever had radish on your taco? We know a few authentic places. Post us a comment if you are curious. We spent some time in Latin countries and in California so our pallet regarding Hispanic food has been well developed. The things one must suffer through : ) What is your favorite type of Hispanic food?

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MiMi’s Flower

MiMi’s Cynoglossum Amabile (Chinese Forget Me Not) flowers have finally bloomed. These short and thick sprouts are sure to grow into a beautiful addition around the house. For only a dollar this is a great way to introduce your children to gardening. The growing medium discourages over watering because it is a little lose, runny and slow to absorb. Similar growing mediums are available for growing other seeds / plants. These blocks are sold individually from kits and come in blocks of different sizes. They also come in packs with a tray. These packs also have growing medium sold in different sizes.

Kits are great because they take some of the guess work out of beginning to grow plants that many newbies face. The Soil Blocks and Growing Mediums offer the gardener a way to save in many forms. If you would like to learn more about Soil Blocks read our article titled “Soil Blocks” dated May 4, 2020. So far, we favor well drained clay pots. Many kits will not come with a clay pot but you can find one at your local garden center for a little more than $1 depending on the size you want. Metal pots can be lined and if you are remaining true to the Organic Journey you probably do not want to use plastic pots.

Among the Cynoglossum Amabile flowers we also found our Korean Radishes sprouting all over the place now that, fingers crossed, our vole problem is under control and we do not have underground munching going on. Our Pumpkin, Sugar Baby Watermelon and Beans (Green, Pinto & Lentil) are all doing very well. The plants have been getting plenty of water from Mother Nature over the last several days and are slotted to get a lot more over the next several days. We love and we think the plants do too. As soon as the rain lets up and we get a few sunny and calm days, we will set some plants out for transplanting and hopefully get the rest of the plants out into the garden. We halted transplanting until we could figure out our pest problem and then came the rain. So, hopefully we will get back on track in about a week.

We have a few squash and melon lovers out there, we are sure they are happy to see them sprouting and doing well. What pest problems have you encountered? How can you use these Organic Pest Remedies around the house as well as in the garden? What do you think the benefits would be? Do you think it would help save money and improve your health? Share your comments with the community by positing them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep growing.

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Korean Connection

Now that we have 3 more rows, we decided to gather a couple more seeds to sow to fill in our garden as we wrap up the planting phase and move into cultivation. We sowed a few directly into the ground and will be transplanting another 10 – 14 plants over the next few weeks. After we get all our transplants out, everything that we will be sowing for the season will be in the garden. We will then focus our efforts outside and tuck our remaining seeds away in a cool dry place until next season. As we were looking for a few more seeds to sow and perhaps a good deal since the sowing season is winding down, we discovered a slim selection and no deals. Nurseries and garden centers have begun to put out plants and flowers. We did however find some okra, which should be an interesting and delicious addition to the garden.

We were so intrigued by the Korean “lettuce” that we decided to get a little more adventurous. The pickings were also slimmer than before. Nonetheless, we picked up a couple more lettuce like seeds as well as some radishes and green onions Korean style. We sowed these seeds directly into the garden. It has been a beautiful day and the garden is always a peaceful as well as fruitful place to be. As much work as there seems to be, there seems also to be an abundance of peace and connection with nature while working in the garden. It never seems nearly as long as it is. The time flies. The bugs and worms are busy beneath the surface doing their work as well. So are the birds, bees and butterflies. We are not so much worried about them as we are about the ants that never seem to go away.

These Korean Seedlings should be interesting to observer as well as eat. We hope you are feeling just as adventurous as us. If so, grocery stores are another common place to source international seeds. So, try your local international food market to locate some international seeds. Every seed we selected we got a little information on since the packet was all in Korean. Even if it was a lose translation. We discovered a few things about our seeds:

  • What is it like? In other words, is it like Spinach. Often we got it is like such and such but, with for instance, a different texture.
  • How do you cook it? Can you eat it raw? Must it be cooked? What are common dishes that it is cooked in. For instance, soup or salad.
  • What is its name? In English or in the foreign name so you can research it. Or ask us.

From what we discovered, we have a few lettuce like, radish and green onion Korean varieties. But they should be nothing like what we have had before. The whole process will be an interesting learning experience and adventure. What are your favorite international foods? Where are your local international food markets? Tell us about any gardening deals you see! Share the wealth of information with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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From the Far East

Korean "Lettuce" Seeds Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Beginning your own garden, and an organic one at that, is an adventure in it self. So is going to the international food market. I am pretty adventurous. But, if I am not in a restaurant my adventure gauge for food goes down. What is it? And how do you cook it? Well, today I got a few answers and that is all I need to add some intrigue and adventure to our organic garden. The seed packet is all in Korean, which I completely do not speak, read nor write. The guy at the international food market told me that it was something like a Korean lettuce they “…like it” and that it could be eaten fresh or cooked. So, I am guessing a little more like Spinach. He said they liked it. Initially, I was hoping for basil. At least something I know. But this was better. Something totally new. Not too adventurous. How adventurous is lettuce anyway. The picture of the plant gave me a good idea of spacing and depth. That it is similar to lettuce gave me an idea of how to care for the plant. Initially, I thought no…it’s in all Korean. I don’t stand a chance. But I went ahead and did it anyway. They are in the ground now and we are off to another gardening journey.

I have traveled the world; studied international relations; been to an array of ethnic restaurants in and out of the states; try to speak a second language and have meet a host of people from across the globe. So, I thought it only fitting that we add some international varieties to our garden.

It is important to note that when you are trying a plant you know very little about to test and taste the harvest at different stages of maturity to determine when it is ripe or has the ideal flavor. What international foods do you like that you want to grow in your own garden? What are their nutritional benefits? How can you learn more about a seed when the packet is in a foreign language? How can you learn how to cook your international favorites? Have questions? Want to share? Do you have a international recipe? Share with us by leaving a comment. And send us lots of pictures! We are visuals. Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

Korean “Lettuce” like
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook