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How to Keep a Christmas Cactus Alive Forever

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Elizabeth Yuko
12/26/20 9:00AM
Source: Life Hacker
Feature Photo Source: Unsplash, Aaron Burden

When you’re going grocery shopping this time of year, it makes sense to want to get in and out as quickly as possible. So if you’ve breezed past the seasonal plants that usually live at the front of the store near the shopping carts and hit the aisles Supermarket Sweep-style, there’s a good chance that you’ve missed the Christmas cacti. (They’re the ones that aren’t poinsettias.)

They may not look very Christmassy—especially since many of them are varying shades of pinks, oranges and yellows—but that’s actually a good thing, because these plants deserve a spot on your windowsill year-round. Actually, there are reports of Christmas cacti living more than 100 years, so there’s a chance that grocery store plant could outlive you. Here are some tips for making that happen (or at least keeping it healthy).Use Chopsticks to Aerate the Soil of Your Houseplants

Whether you’re more of a casual houseplant owner who’s happy if you remember to water it, or are so

How to care for a Christmas cactus

If you picked up or were given a Christmas cactus this year, don’t throw it out at the beginning of the year, as you might a live Christmas tree. It’s basically part of your family now, so it’s time to learn how to take care of it.

In an interview with Tulsa WorldDr. Tom Ingram, a horticulturalist at Oklahoma State University, shared some tips for keeping that colorful cactus alive. (Which probably takes more effort than you think).

First of all, Ingram explains that Christmas cacti are what those in the plant business call “short day plants”—meaning that for them to produce flower buds, they need reduced sunlight and cooler temperatures. This works outdoors in Brazil, where the cacti are native, but not so much indoors in the winter. But there are ways to make it work. Per Ingram:

  • Keep the cactus in a cool, bright indoor location where daytime temps are between 65-70 degrees and evening temps are between 55-65 degrees. (That might mean on a drafty windowsill or somewhere that doesn’t get as much heat as the rest of your place.)
  • If the cactus is kept somewhere that doesn’t get down to around 55 degrees at night, it will need a minimum of 12 hours of darkness each night for about six weeks before they will bloom.
  • Make sure the pot has good drainage. Don’t overwater, but also keep in mind that this type of cactus doesn’t retain water like its succulent colleagues.
  • Re-pot your plant approximately every three years, but not more frequently than that. (They like to set down roots.)

How to Keep an Indoor Plant Alive

Keeping an indoor plant alive means providing it with what it needs on a long-term basis. Keeping…Read moreSubscribe to our newsletter!Type your emailSign me upBy subscribing you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

Ingram offers more detailed advice in the article, but if nothing else, these tips will keep you from putting your Christmas cactus on top of the radiator because you assume it wants as much heat as possible and pretend like it is at home in a desert.Elizabeth YukoPostsTwitter

Dr. Elizabeth Yuko is a bioethicist and adjunct professor of ethics at Fordham University. She has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, Rolling Stone & CNN.

How was this article helpful? What works best for you with your house plants? Why? Why not?

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COVID 19 Cases on the Rise: Your States Stats

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Source: Wavy 10 – Norfolk, VA, USA
WASHINGTON (NEXSTAR) — As coronavirus cases in the United States climb towards another peak, new daily cases have reached their highest point yet in 17 states, according to the New York Times.

On Thursday, new confirmed cases climbed over the 65,000 mark — a total the country hasn’t seen since the end of July. Additionally, we’re seeing cases rise in more than 45 states, according to a Times tracking tool.

The U.S. leads the world with 7.9 million coronavirus cases and some 217,000 confirmed deaths. Globally, there have been 39 million reported cases and 1.09 million confirmed deaths.Pfizer coronavirus vaccine won’t be available before Election Day, CEO confirms.

As the nation experiences a 25% increase in confirmed cases, here’s a look at the states that are seeing the highest percentage increases in COVID-19 cases:

States seeing case increases (by percentages):

  • New Mexico – Average of 457 cases per day, an increase of 123 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Vermont – Average of nine cases per day, an increase of 110 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New Hampshire – Average of 78 cases per day, an increase of 101 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Montana – Average of 611 cases per day, an increase of 91 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Connecticut – Average of 326 cases per day, an increase of 80 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Indiana – Average of 1,655 cases per day, an increase of 66 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Wyoming – Average of 183 cases per day, an increase of 65 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Alaska – Average of 193 cases per day, an increase of 64 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Rhode Island – Average of 199 cases per day, an increase of 63 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Arizona – Average of 763 cases per day, an increase of 59 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Colorado – Average of 894 cases per day, an increase of 57 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Michigan – Average of 1,483 cases per day, an increase of 56 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Nebraska – Average of 767 cases per day, an increase of 55 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • North Dakota – Average of 610 cases per day, an increase of 54 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Ohio – Average of 1,654 cases per day, an increase of 53 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • South Dakota – Average of 653 cases per day, an increase of 50 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Mississippi – Average of 760 cases per day, an increase of 49 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Illinois – Average of 3,069 cases per day, an increase of 48 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Virginia – Average of 1,058 cases per day, an increase of 42 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Pennsylvania – Average of 1,362 cases per day, an increase of 39 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Tennessee – Average of 1,870 cases per day, an increase of 38 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Idaho – Average of 660 cases per day, an increase of 37 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • North Carolina – Average of 1,943 cases per day, an increase of 36 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New Jersey – Average of 835 cases per day, an increase of 35 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • West Virginia – Average of 251 cases per day, an increase of 33 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Nevada – Average of 587 cases per day, an increase of 30 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New York – Average of 1,329 cases per day, an increase of 29 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Washington – Average of 659 cases per day, an increase of 29 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Minnesota – Average of 1,312 cases per day, an increase of 28 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Kentucky – Average of 980 cases per day, an increase of 27 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Missouri – Average of 1,916 cases per day, an increase of 27 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Wisconsin – Average of 3,124 cases per day, an increase of 25 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Utah – Average of 1,216 cases per day, an increase of 23 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Alabama – Average of 1,027 cases per day, an increase of 21 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Oregon – Average of 345 cases per day, an increase of 21 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Massachusetts – Average of 663 cases per day, an increase of 20 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Kansas – Average of 788 cases per day, an increase of 19 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Florida – Average of 2,711 cases per day, an increase of 18 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Oklahoma – Average of 1,182 cases per day, an increase of 16 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Georgia – Average of 1,409 cases per day, an increase of 14 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Iowa – Average of 1,044 cases per day, an increase of 13 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • South Carolina – Average of 907 cases per day, an increase of 13 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Arkansas – Average of 911 cases per day, an increase of 11 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Maryland – Average of 589 cases per day, an increase of 11 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Texas – Average of 4,587 cases per day, an increase of 8 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Louisiana – Average of 543 cases per day, an increase of 7 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Delaware – Average of 125 cases per day, an increase of 5 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • California – Average of 3,285 cases per day, an increase of 2 percent from the average two weeks earlier.

States seeing case decreases (by percentages):

  • Hawaii – Average of 89 cases per day, a decrease of 17 percent from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Maine – Average of 28 cases per day, a decrease of 9 percent from the average two weeks earlier.

Just when we think we are coming out of this pandemic and we struggle to get back to normal after the economic crisis that came along with the pandemic, we see many states still struggling with COVID 19 cases Norfolk, VA, USA included. While our cases continue to fluctuate our state is not one of the states that was hit the hardest by COVID 19 cases. We took a cautious and measured approach and it paid dividends. In fact as factors, such as going back to school and mere weather change, now have to be factored in, some of the European countries that were fairing better in the crisis are now seeing new and emerging struggles with COVID 19. COVID 19 has definitely taken its place in history. What solutions have worked well for your state? How are people adjusting to having to spend more times in doors, which has lead to less social distancing, due primarily to weather change and an increase in COVID 19 cases across the globe? What are you winter plans and how do you plan to maintain social distancing measures and keep your immune system strong? Remember, healthy is the New Normal! States such as Hawaii and California may likely fair better than other states like New York and Vermont where citizens will be forced to spend more time indoors in the warmth bracing against the cold winter weather while Hawaii and California can still take advantage of the fresh circulating air outdoors and easier means of social distancing.

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What your Plants need from Soil

How to Fertilize Indoor Plants | A Beginner's Guide

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Fertilizing Plants
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Soil is the life line of your plant. Your plants get nutrients from the soil. The soil is where your plants draw some of its ‘food’ from. So, whether it is a house plant or a garden plant, one must make sure that it is properly fertilized. House plants must have fertilizer because it depletes its soil and is not outside. Plants in outside soil may or may not be properly replenished by being outside, so it is still important to make sure that your plants get the appropriate fertilizer aka ‘food’ aka nutrients it needs from the soil. In fact when one waters one should water the soil rather than the plant. How has this article helped you? Ever wondered why your house plans seem to die slowly? But you watered it, right! What is the importance of fertilizing plants particularly plants in containers? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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MiMi’s Flower

cynoglossum amabile shidonna raven garden and cook

MiMi’s flower has come a long way since they were just a couple of seeds. Her flowers’ have begun to finally blossom into beautiful clusters of deep lavender. They began as a few seeds in a growing kit. MiMi and Mom have since gotten their own growing kit with 2 different flowers. MiMi’s gift blossomed into a wonderful exploration between MiMi and Mom into starting their own kitchen garden. And the Cynoglossum Amabiles are a wonderful addition to our front porch. What easy and simple ways can you start your own garden along with MiMi, Mom and many others. Since the beginning of the pandemic many people have begun their own gardens for various reasons. Do you think starting a garden as a response to the pandemic is a good idea? Why? Share your thoughts below by posting a comment. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep growing!

Cynoglossum Amabile – MiMi’s Flower
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

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Sow, Everything!

Sowing Seeds: Absolutely Everything You Need to Know

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Everything you need to know about Sowing
Source::Grow Veg
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

You are fully informed on the basics and then some when it comes to sowing seeds. Now is a great time to start a garden and to join the many others who have started their own gardens since COVID 19. How did this article help you? What did you learn? What will you sow? Email us photos and we will share them with the community.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.