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How To Care for a Spider Plant Like a Pro

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Spider Plant

These easy-care plants are just what your home needs right now
Source: Country Living

Arricca Elin Sansone
Country Living

BY ARRICCA ELIN SANSONE
JAN 10, 2021
Feature Photo Source: Unsplash, Lucian Alexe

The spider plant has been popular for decades as a low-maintenance houseplant with plenty of personality. With its strappy arching leaves, it looks equally pretty on a tabletop or in a hanging basket where its draping form is highlighted. They’re forgiving houseplants that can live for many years with the right conditions, and they also generate cute baby plants, called plantlets, that dangle from long stems. “It’s an endearing plant, it’s easy to find, and it’s inexpensive, so it’s a great addition to any home,” says Lisa Eldred Steinkopf, author of Houseplant Party and thehouseplantguru.com. “There are many different varieties available as well.”

Here’s everything you need to know to care for the spider plant.

How much light does my spider plant need?

Spider plants do best in medium to bright light. They’ll take low light but won’t look great because they tend to get leggy and floppy in time, says Steinkopf. They’re happiest in east-or west-facing windows, and they’ll do fine in south-facing windows. But don’t put them in direct sunlight, which will cause burns. If your house is too dark, get an inexpensive LED grow light to give them what they need.

How often should I water my spider plant?

Spider plants like steady moisture. That doesn’t mean you should drench your plant, but spider plants do like soil that’s evenly moist. If your home is super-dry, especially in winter, place your plant on a tray filled with pebbles. Keep water in the tray to boost the humidity level around the plants. Misting isn’t necessary, but go ahead and do it if it makes you feel better! You also can get a small humidifier to run or group several other plants together, which will increase overall humidity in the area.

Should I fertilize my spider plant?

As long as your plant is getting adequate light, it’s making its own food. But it doesn’t hurt to feed it occasionally, if you like. Remember that like outdoor plants, your plant isn’t growing much in winter, so feed it only from spring to fall. Choose any general all-purpose houseplant fertilizer, and apply it at ¼ to ½ strength the package directions.

Why does my spider plant have brown tips on the leaves?

Don’t worry! It’s very common with spider plants and doesn’t mean you’re a bad plant parent. There are many different reasons these occur, such as inconsistent watering or minerals in your tap water, which can build up in the soil. Trim off the brown bits into a pointed shape, then try watering with distilled water, filtered water, or rain water from now on, suggests Steinkopf. It also may help to flush the pot occasionally by watering until it runs out the drain holes.

You can make new spider plants from the “babies.”

When you see little root nubs on the babies, trim the plantlet off and place in another pot of soil. Use a bent paper clip to keep it in contact with the soil, water as usual, and that’s it! Or you can set a smaller pot next to the big plant, and place the plantlet in the soil of the smaller pot while still attached to the mother plant. That way, it’s getting nutrients until it’s rooted, when you can cut the stem from the original plant. It’s also fine to leave the babies in place if you like the looks of them.

Which plants are your favorite indoor / houseplants? Why? Which plants are you growing in your home this fall and winter? Are they herbs or fruit bearing?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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The 8 Best Indoor Plants: Top Picks From Plant Experts

Leah Koenig, Contributor
Source: Forbes

When it comes to caring for house plants, some folks are born with a green thumb while others swear they could kill a cactus. As a member of the latter category (or so I thought), I understand the hesitation that goes along with becoming a plant parent. I loved the idea of filling my space with the best indoor plants, but I was scared to end up with a bunch of dead foliage.

Indoor house plants from The Sill
Source: Forbes
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Then two years ago, a friend (who is also a gardening teacher) brought over a plant clipping to my apartment. She helped me settle it in a pot and shared advice on how to care for it. That gifted plant ushered me into the wide world of indoor greenery—my collection has grown to 11 house plants spread over three window sills—brightening my home and offering fulfillment along the way.

For aspiring plant parents who feel apprehensive about embarking on their own plant journeys like I once did, know that there are plenty of great indoor plant options for every skill level and environment. I sought out the advice of a few notable plant experts: Eliza Blank and Erin Marino, founder and marketing director, respectively, of The Sill; Christan Summers, CEO and co-founder of Tula Plants & Design; and Summer Rayne Oakes, founder of Homestead Brooklyn and Plant One On Me. They not only shared their extensive flora wisdom, but they also offered their picks for the best indoor plants, for beginners, less than hospitable conditions and beyond.

Check out their recommendations below, then read on for their expert tips on how to care for all your indoor plants.

  • Best Low Maintenance Indoor Plant: Marble Queen Pothos
  • Best Indoor Plant For Low Light: ZZ Plant
  • Best Indoor Plant For Small Spaces: Snake Plant
  • Best Flowering Indoor Plant: Anthurium
  • Best Indoor Plant for Clean Air: Parlor Palm
  • Best Indoor Plant For Pet Owners: Bird’s Nest Fern
  • Best Indoor Plant to Build Confidence: Philodendron
  • Best “Next Level” Indoor Plant: Monstera

Best Low Maintenance Indoor Plant

Known to be one of the easiest house plants to grow, the Marble Queen Pothos has lovely heart shaped leaves and growing vines that will quickly fill your plant shelf with beauty. Because it can thrive in low-light environments and with less-than-ideal watering practices, this very undemanding species is excellent for beginners or for anyone who is less than diligent about their plant care.


Best Indoor Plant For Low Light

The Zamioculcas zamiifolia, better known as the ZZ plant, is another reliable house plant option for beginners. It can withstand all sorts of less than ideal factors, like infrequent watering or dry air. And, most importantly for apartment dwellers or those who live in other shady spaces, they can easily tolerate low light environments. Attractive as a standalone or grouped with other plants, the ZZ plant is a happy option for the kitchen or bathroom.


Best Indoor Plant For Small Spaces

Available in a number of different varieties, this cheery succulent grows straight up, which makes it a great choice for people with small spaces. Snake plants are also said to purify indoor air, so some folks like them for their supposed purification qualities too. Group a few in different sizes near a bedroom window and you’ll have a nice arrangement to bring a little green to your sleeping space.


Best Flowering Indoor Plant

Known for their lipstick red (or dusky pink) lily pad–like blooms, anthurium are gaining traction on the list of best house plants. “They have a retro, ‘Mad Men’ vibe to them,” Marino says. “And the flowers are actually a modified leaf so the plant is in bloom year round.” Use your anthurium as an entryway or living room centerpiece, or add it to a green collection for a pretty pop of color.


Best Indoor Plant For Clean Air

The Parlor Palm is a tropical choice that’s often touted for it’s ability to clear out benzene and trichloroethylene, two chemicals that are commonly spread from furniture off-gassing. It’s also really low maintenance, thriving in indirect to low light and only requiring watering once every one to two weeks, and pet-friendly, so you don’t have to worry about keeping it locked up away from your fur babies.

While the science is still out on whether or not plants really purify the air—one study says that you’d need to have about 93 of them to really notice a significant difference—there’s something about being surrounded by greenery that just makes things feel cleaner and fresher.


Best Indoor Plant For Pet Owners

While ZZ plants and snake plants are inarguably great choices for beginners, they are unfortunately toxic to animals. “If you have a curious kitty or doggy, then I would recommend keeping those plants away from them,” Oakes explains. Instead, choose a Bird’s Nest Fern, a tropical houseplant with ruffle-edged leaves that provides a splash of green while being safe to furry friends.


Best Indoor Plant to Build Confidence

There is nothing like a healthy, quickly growing plant to amp up a new plant owner’s confidence. Philodendron vines deliver on this front, sprouting robust trails of vines dangling with heart-shaped leaves. “Philodendrons are easy to propagate, so before long you can take a cutting and make another plant,” Summers says. “Getting that positive affirmation makes you feel like a pro.”


Best “Next Level” Indoor Plant

Once you unlock your inner house plant mojo, Blank recommends graduating to a Monstera. The vibrantly green leaves are speckled with natural holes and lend a tropical vibe to the room. “They are still relatively easy but have a wonderful texture,” Blank says.


How to Care For Indoor Plants

Each expert I spoke with began with the same basic mantra: Light is food for plants. “Fertilizer offers extra nutrients and water helps, but your plant needs light to survive,” says Marino. She suggests standing near the window in your house or apartment around noon and noticing how hot and bright it feels. “You should be able to estimate if your apartment is relatively low light, medium light or high light at midday,” she explains. Assessing your home’s light situations serves as a guide for which plants you should choose to populate your sill (or mantle, shelf or desk).

“We think of plant buying a bit like matchmaking,” says Blank. We want your plants to fit your home, your style and your lifestyle.” Set yourself up for success by starting with low maintenance plant varieties, like a Marble Queen Pothos or ZZ plant, that can withstand a little accidental neglect while you travel up the learning curve.

Plants need good care in order to thrive, but new plant parents have the tendency to over-care for their plants. “Over-watering is the easiest way to kill your plant,” says Blank. “It’s easier to bounce back from under-watering than from over-watering.” Marino adds, “some people go into diagnosis mode the second they see a browning tip or yellowing leaf.” Her advice: don’t panic. “Just prune it right off and know that shedding is a natural part of the growth process.”MORE FROM FORBES14 Easy Indoor Herb Garden Kits, Plus Expert Tips For Growing SuccessBy Rachel Klein

Summers, meanwhile, advises against repotting plants too frequently. Some plant owners see a plant growing well and think that’s the time to switch it into a roomier pot. But that well-meaning impulse can backfire. “Repotting disrupts the plant’s root system, which means it has to focus on reestablishing its system instead of on new growth. You’re making it work harder than it needs to,” she says. Instead let your plants thrive in their current pots. “When you’re getting absolutely no growth — especially in spring and summer — then it is time,” Summers says. 

Just because some plants don’t need frequent watering doesn’t mean you should forget about them for too long. Take some time each day to touch base with your plant babies. “Developing a routine and ritual is important,” says Oakes. “If you get up to check on your plants when your coffee is brewing or tea is steeping, then you’re on the right path.” 

From YouTube and gardening books, to walking into a shop and chatting up the staff, there are endless sources to continue educating yourself about the house plants in your life. For those who can’t make it to a store, Tula offers robust educational resources like a plant care library. The Sill offers online workshops that answer burning plant care questions. And Oakes recently launched a 12-part mini course called Houseplant Basics that teaches the fundamentals of plant care. 

Which plant do you like for your home? Why? How was this article helpful?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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Repairing Flower Stem

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Marigold Flower

When our African Marigold was outside it bent way over to reach the sun, as plants do. Lets pause here. What we should have done was rotate the flower so that the stem would not bend in an effort to reach the resources of the sun. When we brought the Marigold inside for the winter we decided to turn her so that her stem would straighten out. However, the bend was too drastic and the position we placed her in, so a few days after bringing her end we notice that her stem had been almost folded in an effort to reach the sun. So, we acted quickly but did not have a stake on hand to repair her damaged stem.

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Marigold Flower

As they say: improvise. In an effort to improvise and offer a speedy repair with no tape on hand nor stake. We cut open a drinking stray and placed it around her stem where the bend is to give her and nature time to do what it does best: heal. Stay tuned to see how this fix worked out.

We are hoping that she heals and heals fast. Have you used any unorthodox plant repair techniques? Tell us about it. How did it work out? What did you learn?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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5 tips for taking care of your houseplants and patio plants during the winter

Plant Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

By ALEX GROVES | agroves@scng.com | The Press-Enterprise
PUBLISHED: November 30, 2020 at 8:43 a.m. | UPDATED: November 30, 2020 at 8:53 a.m.
Source: OCR Register
Feature Photo Source: Unsplash, Toa-Heftiba

Houseplant parenthood has been a trend accelerated by the novel coronavirus pandemic, but to quote Ned Stark from “Game of Thrones”: “Winter is Coming.”

Even in Southern California, where “winter” is a relative term, plant experts say there are a list of considerations to think about in a time period when there’s less light, drier air and chillier temperatures to contend with, even with indoor plants.

Here are their tips for what to do with your plants when the days are short:

1. Know when to move plants

Danae Horst, owner of Folia Collective in Eagle Rock and author of the book “Houseplants for All: How to Fill Any Home with Happy Plants,” said that lots of houseplants such as monsteras, cactus and succulents require a lot of bright filtered light in order to thrive and as winter time approaches the shorter days mean that there’s less of that bright light indoors.

For a lot of houseplants that means that their growth might slow down and they might even lose some of their leaves because they’re not getting enough light to feed themselves through photosynthesis. Cactuses may take on unusual growth pattern where they stretch themselves out looking for light and might even get to a point where they can’t support themselves.

Horst said that sometimes determining where the best source of light in your home is and moving the plants there, is a good solution.

“For instance, if you have one south or southwestern facing window, that’s going to be a good place for plants no matter what time of year and you may end up needing to put a bunch more of your northern or eastern facing plants in a different window just for the few months where the days are much shorter,” she said.

While some houseplants are more finicky and may need to be moved, others are a little more carefree, Horst said, including the low-light tolerant sansevierias (snake plants) and Zamioculcas zamiifolias(ZZ plants).

Spider plants, pothos and Chinese evergreen are other plants that are hardy in the darker conditions, according to Nehemias de Leon-Martin, a manager at Planta Nursery in Highland Park.

2. Be prepared to water less

Mackenna Rowley, owner of Riverside plant store Piep, said that how much water plants use is based on the amount of light that they are receiving. Less light means less water is needed.

Rowley said that a common issue she sees with her customers is that they might be watering their houseplants on a schedule and the plant will do well for a while and then suddenly in the fall — when light hours are decreasing — its leaves start turning yellow.

“It’s because they’re giving it more water than it needs for the amount of light that it’s getting,” she said.

Rowley said it’s generally a better idea to not water on set schedule but rather to keep tabs on how dry the plant’s soil is and water according to that.

3. Maintain humidity  

Colder air is generally drier and that could have an impact on plants, but so can turning on your gas or electric heater — that can really dry out the air, too, according to Horst.

Rowley recommends seeing where your plants are in relation to heat sources.

“As you start turning on your heat, do a quick check throughout your whole house, then notice where the vents are and make sure the plants aren’t directly under them or within two or three feet.” Rowley said.

For plants that need elevated humidity even during the non-winter months — such as calatheas, ferns and marantas — humidity is going to be particularly important. Horst recommends using a humidifier to keep the air less dry but does not recommend other methods such as misting the plants. She says the amount of humidity that adds is fairly limited and the lingering moisture on leaves can lead to things like fungal infections and leaf spot disorders.

de Leon-Martin said one of his tricks is to group plants together and in doing so that locks the humidity into one place as the plants share humid air among themselves.

“If you group them, they kind of help each other,” he said.

4. Know when to bring plants indoors

Whether you bring plants inside or not generally depends on the type of plant and how established it is.

Rowley said there are some plants that can live outdoors in Southern California all year long, especially once they’ve become big and established. These include plants such as birds of paradise and succulents.

“But generally under about 40 degrees and they’re not going to love it,” she said. “It’s only if you have a large, hearty plant, that they’re going to be able to thrive.”

Gary Jones, Armstrong Garden Centers’ chief horticulturist & training manager, said that smaller tropical plants should be brought inside if there’s the potential for frost.

If a plant is too big to bring in, “just simply covering tropical plants or a house plant with any kind of a lightweight cloth makes a huge difference,” he said.

But there are some things to think about before bringing plants indoors.

Horst said that there’s always the possibility that the plants might have picked up some pests from being outside, such as spider mites, mealybugs and thrips. She said it’s important to examine plants to see if they have these bugs and appropriately quarantine them so the bugs don’t spread to other plants.

It’s also important to make sure that you’re giving the plants as much light as possible since they were likely receiving a lot of light, Horst said.

5. What to do if your patio plants get damage 

If your patio plants receive frost damage on their leaves, your first instinct may be to cut the plant way back, but Jones says it’s better to wait.

“Most people cut off good growth,” he said. “It looks bad but it actually is just fine, so they’re cutting back way more than they need to. The plant will recover.”

Jones said to wait a couple weeks until you see new growth and then you can cut the plant to that point.

Where will you put your plants when you bring them indoors? Are they near a natural light source? Do you have grow lights?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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Tips for Bringing Outdoor Plants Indoors

Written by Marie Iannotti
Reviewed by Debra LaGattuta, Updated 11/25/20
Source: The Spruce

outdoor container plant arrangement
Source: The Spruce / Christopher Lee Foto
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Good news, plant lovers: The end of the outdoor gardening season does not have to mean the end of your container plants. Although most will not survive the winter in freezing climates, they can be brought indoors as houseplants to help them make it through the colder months. Once nighttime temperatures become cooler, it’s time to think about bringing your more delicate or temperamental plants indoors (that includes any vacationing houseplants that you brought outdoors in the spring). With a bit of strategy and a little TLC, your outdoor beauties can make it through winter unscathed and ready to enjoy another season in the sunlight come spring.

Choose the Right Plants

Successfully overwintering plants indoors starts with choosing the right type of plants. Contrary to popular belief, not all plants can survive indoor growing conditions (or at the very least, not all plants can thrive indoors), especially if your home has limited light, warmth, or humidity. There’s a good chance that there are fewer sunny spots inside your house than in your yard, so you’ll have to make some tough choices about which plants are worth keeping for the season and if you can give them the care they need indoors.

Although it’s tempting to want to move every plant you’ve been growing outdoors inside for the winter, it’s also impractical. Before you get to rearranging your greenery, run through the below checklist and hang onto the plants that meet the following criteria:

  • Keep only healthy plants. If something has been struggling all summer under the best of conditions, it’s probably not going to improve indoors. Time to face reality and send it to its final resting place in the plant graveyard (aka the compost).
  • Never bring a plant indoors that has pests or diseases. Problems spread more quickly among indoor plants than in the garden, and even if you take great care to quarantine the troubled plant until it’s been coaxed back to health, there’s no guarantee that you won’t spread the issue to your other plants. Plus, there are no natural insect predators in the house, making the conditions ideal for spreading disease. Check all plants thoroughly for any signs of problems before you bring them indoors. 
  • Give priority to your favorite plants. When deciding which to bring indoors for the season (assuming you have limited space), give preference to any varietals that you’ve already invested a lot of time and energy into, like the ferns you’ve been coddling for years, anything you’ve trained into a standard, and sentimental favorites. Of course, expensive splurges are worth the effort too, if you have the room.
  • If the plant would look good as a houseplant, bring it indoors. Many homes have enough light to successfully grow several flowering varietals like winter geraniumsfuchsiabegonias, and even passion flower, all of which can bloom beautifully indoors. Sure, they might not look as lush or vibrant as they would outdoors, but it’s still nice to have something flowering in winter and the plants will be ready to start blooming again outdoors early in the spring.
  • Consider giving priority to certain vegetables, like small pepper or tomato plants. They’re actually tropical perennials and, when given enough light, will continue to produce fruits all through winter. However, some may need an especially large pot, so you’ll have more success growing compact, patio varieties—cherry tomatoes and small-fruited peppers like chilies or cherry varieties will fruit easiest and produce a higher yield. Keep in mind, there are no insects or gentle breezes indoors to pollinate your plants, so you will have to pollinate them manually.

Alternatives to Bringing Plants Indoors

It’s important not to overlook that some of your plants, like tender perennials, may actually benefit from a period of dormancy in the winter months. Plan to overwinter varietals like potted lavender and rosemary in your garage or basement—as long as the temperature doesn’t dip below 20 degrees Fahrenheit or above 40 degrees Fahrenheit, they won’t freeze but will stay dormant. Take care not to let the pots dry out or stay overly wet—water them only when the soil becomes dry a couple of inches below the surface and allow any excess to drain out.

When dividing your winter plan of attack for your plants, be realistic about your available space and winter light. Remember, even if you choose not to bring a plant indoors in its entirety, you can always start cuttings from the mother plant. They’ll take up far less space and may even do better than established plants throughout the winter because they won’t suffer the shock of having to adapt to new growing conditions. The young plants will have time to develop their root systems during winter and will be ready to be moved out into the garden and start growing early in the spring.

Once you’ve decided which plants to move indoors, give them time to acclimate to being houseplants. Bring them inside while the windows are still open and the temperature indoors is about the same as outdoors. That way, they’ll be able to adjust to the change in temperature and humidity more easily, rather than waiting until a frost is expected and then bringing them into a dry, heated home.

If the temperature outside is already different from inside, what do you do? Ask! by leaving a comment below.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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What your Plants need from Soil

How to Fertilize Indoor Plants | A Beginner's Guide

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Fertilizing Plants
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Soil is the life line of your plant. Your plants get nutrients from the soil. The soil is where your plants draw some of its ‘food’ from. So, whether it is a house plant or a garden plant, one must make sure that it is properly fertilized. House plants must have fertilizer because it depletes its soil and is not outside. Plants in outside soil may or may not be properly replenished by being outside, so it is still important to make sure that your plants get the appropriate fertilizer aka ‘food’ aka nutrients it needs from the soil. In fact when one waters one should water the soil rather than the plant. How has this article helped you? Ever wondered why your house plans seem to die slowly? But you watered it, right! What is the importance of fertilizing plants particularly plants in containers? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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MiMi’s Flower

cynoglossum amabile shidonna raven garden and cook

MiMi’s flower has come a long way since they were just a couple of seeds. Her flowers’ have begun to finally blossom into beautiful clusters of deep lavender. They began as a few seeds in a growing kit. MiMi and Mom have since gotten their own growing kit with 2 different flowers. MiMi’s gift blossomed into a wonderful exploration between MiMi and Mom into starting their own kitchen garden. And the Cynoglossum Amabiles are a wonderful addition to our front porch. What easy and simple ways can you start your own garden along with MiMi, Mom and many others. Since the beginning of the pandemic many people have begun their own gardens for various reasons. Do you think starting a garden as a response to the pandemic is a good idea? Why? Share your thoughts below by posting a comment. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep growing!

Cynoglossum Amabile – MiMi’s Flower
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Growing & Harvesting Carrots in Containers

Harvesting Carrots from Containers

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Growing & Harvesting Carrots in Containers
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Its amazing what you can grow in containers. No more limits for the urban and container gardener. Are you ready to grow your own carrots or vegetable? Which one(s) would you like to grow? What questions do you have? Leave us a post. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep growing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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Watermelon, Greenhouses & Indoor Gardening

Sugarbaby Watermelon Shidonna Raven

When we decided to start our garden, as you know, it began humbly with a mere 2 packs of seeds destined for the kitchen window. It quickly grew into over 30 seeds. We planted each one. Some where successful and others were not. But, as Eliot Coleman will tell you, even the experienced farmer learns through trail and error. When we started we began in our mini greenhouse, which is really our garage with 3 windows. We were so excited to get started that we begun at the end of the winter season, which was at the very very beginning of the growing season for many of our seeds in our zone (Virginia, USA). When you began before the last frost has past, you must start inside with the seeds that can be transplanted. Then once the frost has past and its growing season has begun one can transplant them outside. So, because we began early we started in our mini greenhouse and got a jump on the season. Greenhouses can be used year around for various reasons. However, they are key when you want to grow outside of a seeds growing season by either starting early or extending the season.

Pumpkin Flower in Bloom
Pumpkin Flower in Bloom

The watermelon you see (1st image) in our outside garden started as a seedling in our mini greenhouse. The mini greenhouse presented several challenges to us with its high moisture and low light. We discovered there were many other factors that were hindering the success of some of our seedlings. When we had questions and were left scratching our head when our seedlings ran into trouble, we turned to Richard Bray’s book “Greenhouse Gardening” for answers to our questions. Understanding greenhouse gardening is understanding how to garden indoors whether one has a kitchen herb plant or a simple house plant. He helped me to understand factors such as heat, ventilation, watering and sunlight. This book was a tremendous resource that helped us grow our watermelon successfully. We had to sow her several times. At first she did not sprout successfully. But, once we understood greenhouse gardening more, we were able to grow her successfully into a plantling. Now she is in the garden outside thriving. We located “Greenhouse Gardening” for an absolute steal. We love deals around here. Click the link below to get yours. We can not wait to see her fruit. I know someone who is a huge watermelon fan! So we are happy to report that she is doing well and in the same row as pumpkin. Stay tuned to see her progress.

What information do you find helpful? How did “Greenhouse Gardening” by Richard Bray help you? Email us photos to share with the community. Which one do you prefer: pumpkin or watermelon? We have big fans of both. As usually, we are all waiting to taste!

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today. All Rights Reserved – Shidonna Raven (c) 2025 – Garden & Cook.

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Prince Charles Highgrove Gardens

The Highgrove Gardens

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Prince Charles Highgrove Gardens
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

It is said that Highgrove Gardens is one of the most important contemporary gardens in England. Prince Charles has spend over 30 years developing this garden as a beacon of hope for Organic Gardening. Where there is Organic Gardening, not far off typically is Organic Food Consumption. Where are the gardens in your community? Do you have a garden? Even a few herbs in your kitchen is a great start. What did you like about this garden?

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