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Are Raisins Good for You?

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Raisins Grapes

Source: Healthine
Feature Photo Source: Unsplash, Leander Neumann

What are raisins?

The shriveled yellow, brown, or purple morsels known as raisins are actually grapes that have been dried in the sun or in a food dehydrator.

Raisins are commonly used:
  • as a salad topping
  • mixed into oatmeal
  • in yogurt
  • in granola or cereal

You also may have eaten them baked into delicious cookies, breads, and muffins. Despite their small size, raisins are packed with energy and rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

Raisins are naturally sweet and high in sugar and calories, but they’re beneficial to our health when eaten in moderation. In fact, raisins can aid digestion, boost iron levels, and keep your bones strong.

So the next time you’re craving candy or sweets, consider munching on some raisins to satisfy your yearning. Your body will reap the healthy benefits.

The nutrition of raisins

There are several factors to consider about the nutritional benefits of raisins. Read on for a breakdown of what raisins have to offer, both good and bad, to determine if the benefits outweigh any risks.

Sugar and calories

One-half cup of raisins has about 217 caloriesTrusted Source and 47 grams of sugar. For reference, a 12-ounce can of soda has about 150 calories and 33 grams of sugar, depending on the brand.

For this reason, raisins aren’t exactly a low-calorie, or low-sugar treat. It’s no wonder they are sometimes referred to as “nature’s candy.”

High amounts of sugar and calories are pretty typical of dried fruit, which is why keeping an eye on how many raisins you are eating in one sitting is key.

Raisins are often sold in small, single serving boxes, each containing roughly 100 calories. If you have problems with portion control, try purchasing these prepackaged raisins to keep your intake in check.

For endurance athletes, raisins are a great alternative for expensive sports chews and gels. They offer a quick source of much-needed carbohydrates and can help improve your performance.

2011 studyTrusted Source found that raisins were just as effective as a brand of sports jelly beans in improving performance for athletes engaging in moderate- to high-intensity endurance exercise.

Fiber

One-half cup of raisins will give you 3.3 grams of fiberTrusted Source, or roughly 10 to 24 percent of your daily needs, depending on your age and gender.

Fiber helps aid your digestion by softening and increasing the weight and size of your stool. Bulkier stools are easier to pass and can help prevent constipation.

Fiber also helps keep you full for longer because it slows down the emptying of your stomach. If you’re trying to lose weight, eating fibrous foods may help.

Fiber also plays a role in cholesterol levels. Dietary fiber is known to decrease levels of the “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) type of cholesterol.

Iron

Raisins are a good source of iron. One-half cup of raisins contains 1.3 milligrams of iron. That’s about 7 percent of the recommended daily amountTrusted Source for most adult females, and 16 percent for adult men.

Iron is important for making red blood cells and helping them carry oxygen to the cells of your body. You need to eat enough iron in order to prevent iron-deficiency anemia.

Calcium and boron

Raisins have about 45 milligrams of calcium per 1/2-cup serving. This translates to about 4 percent of your daily needs. Calcium is essential for healthy and strong bones and teeth.

If you’re a postmenopausal woman, raisins are a great snack for you because the calcium helps prevent the development of osteoporosis, a disorder characterized by bone loss that usually occurs as you age.

To add to that, raisins contain a high amount of the trace element boron. Boron works with vitamin D and calcium to keep your bones and joints healthy. It also plays a role in treating osteoporosis.

Antioxidants

Raisins are an exceptional source of naturally occurring chemicals called phytonutrients, such as phenols and polyphenols. These types of nutrients are considered antioxidants.

Antioxidants help remove free radicals from your blood and may prevent damage to your cells and DNA. This can lead to diseases like cancerheart disease, and stroke.

Antimicrobial compounds

2009 studyTrusted Source noted that raisins contain phytochemicals that could promote healthy teeth and gums. Phytochemicals present in raisins, including oleanolic acid, linoleic acid, and linolenic acid, fight the bacteria in your mouth that lead to cavities.

In other words, eating raisins in place of sugary snack foods can actually keep your smile healthy.HEALTHLINE NEWSLETTERGet our weekly Men’s Health email

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How to eat raisins

Raisins can be enjoyed right from the box, or they can be thrown into a variety of dishes. From breakfasts to desserts to savory dinners, there are countless possibilities. Here are some ideas on how to incorporate more raisins in your diet:

  • For a healthy take on classic oatmeal raisin cookies, try this flourless version. View the recipe.
  • Raisins add excellent flavor to just about any type of sweet spread. Try making this cinnamon raisin cashew butter if you’re in the mood to try something new. If cashews aren’t your favorite, you can substitute another nut. View the recipe.
  • Spice up chicken salad with raisins and sweet apples. View the recipe.
  • Contrary to popular belief, granola is easy to make at home. Raisins are always an excellent addition to your standard granola recipe. This recipe for cinnamon raisin granola can also be made vegan or gluten-free. View the recipe.
  • Pumpkin, raisin, and flaxseed muffins are full of healthy fiber. View the recipe.
  • It may seem strange to add raisins to your pasta. This pasta dish from the staff at the Mayo Clinic includes spinach, garbanzo beans, and raisins. It’s high in iron, protein, and fiber. View the recipe.

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Make your own raisins

Want to try making your own raisins? It’s simple:

  1. Get some grapes.
  2. Remove the large stems.
  3. Wash them in cool water.
  4. Place them on a tray, and set the tray outside on a dry, sunny day (it works best if the tray has holes or cracks for air circulation).
  5. Rotate the grapes to ensure even sun exposure.

In just two or three days, you’ll have your own raisins.

Next steps

Raisins contain healthy vitamins and minerals. They are also fat-free and cholesterol-free, high in antioxidants, and an excellent source of fiber. Raisins may help you:

  • relieve constipation
  • prevent anemia
  • build and maintain strong bones
  • protect your teeth
  • lower your risk of cancer and heart disease

Raisins contain enough sugar to give you a burst of energy and are a great addition to a healthful diet for most people. If you’ve got a sweet tooth, consider replacing unhealthy, sugary snacks with raisins.

Of course, like any dried fruit, eating too much can be borderline unhealthy because of their high sugar content and calories. While you shouldn’t be afraid to include raisins in your diet, make sure to keep it to a handful at a time.


Jacquelyn Cafasso
Jacquelyn Cafasso

Jacquelyn has been in a writer and research analyst in the health and pharmaceutical space since she graduated with a degree in biology from Cornell University. A native of Long Island, NY, she moved to San Francisco after college, and then took a brief hiatus to travel the world. In 2015, Jacquelyn relocated from sunny California to sunnier Gainesville, Florida, where she owns 7 acres and 58 fruit trees. She loves chocolate, pizza, hiking, yoga, soccer, and Brazilian capoeira. Connect with her on LinkedIn.

What medicinal benefits can you reap from raisins? Have you considered eating raisins as a quick and health snack? How could your health and diet benefit from eating raisins?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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Health Benefits of Cilantro

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Cilantro

Source: Web MD
Feature Photo Source: Unsplash, Lindsay-Moe

Cilantro is a fragrant herb commonly used in Central American, Middle Eastern, and Asian cuisines. In the United States, cilantro refers to the leaves and stems of the Coriandrum sativum plant, while the seeds are called coriander. In many cultures, the word coriander can refer to any part of the plant. 

Health Benefits

Like many culinary herbs, cilantro has been used medicinally since ancient times. Modern research methods are finding support for some of the health claims attributed to this plant. 

Some health benefits of cilantro may include:

Brain Health

Although further research is still needed, several studies have connected eating cilantro with reduced symptoms of cognitive diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. 

In one study, cilantro extract reduced seizure attacks and prevented nerve-cell damage in rats.In another, when fresh cilantro leaves were added to the diets of laboratory mice, scientists saw improvements in their memory.

Reduced Anxiety

In animal studies, extracts from the cilantro plant have proven almost as effective as medication at reducing anxiety symptoms. Studies with human subjects are still needed.

Blood Sugar Management

Cilantro is so well-known for its ability to lower blood sugar that people with low blood sugar or those taking diabetes medications are warned to be careful with the herb. 

In animal studies, coriander seeds reduced blood sugar by stimulating an enzyme that removes sugar from the blood.

In another study, cilantro extract decreased blood sugar in rats with obesity and high blood sugar. The effects were similar to the blood sugar medication glibenclamide.https://2442b8e6b677ebc0a9b530afe5a0c93f.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

Prevent Foodborne Illnesses

The cilantro plant contains dodecenal, an antimicrobial compound that may help protect your body against infections and illnesses caused by tainted food. The compound is effective against Salmonella, a microbe that can cause life-threatening food poisoning.

Another study found that compounds in cilantro are effective against several bacteria, including those that cause foodborne illnesses and hospital-acquired infections.

Nutrition

Cilantro contains vitamins A, C, and K, and the leaves also have folate, potassium, and manganese. However, it’s rarely eaten in large enough amounts to be a significant source of these nutrients.

Nutrients per Serving

1 tablespoon of cilantro contains:

  • Calories: 0
  •  Fiber: 0 grams
  •  Fat: 0 grams
  • Sodium: 0 grams
  • Cholesterol: 0 grams

Things to Watch Out For

People with low blood sugar should be cautious with how much cilantro and coriander they eat. The plant contains enzymes that can reduce blood sugar, so it should be eaten in moderation if you are concerned about low blood sugar.

How to Prepare Cilantro

Fresh cilantro is often paired with lime as an addition to curries, soups, and Asian dishes. Although both the leaves and stems are edible, the stems have a somewhat bitter flavor. Many people prefer to strip the leaves from the plant before adding to recipes, or to chop and add the stems sparingly.

Try these ways to use cilantro in your favorite recipes:

  • Sprinkle chopped cilantro on Mexican dishes and salsas to add a fresh flavor.
  • Make a spring roll by wrapping whole sprigs of cilantro with cooked pork, cucumber, carrot, and vermicelli noodles.
  • Mix cilantro and lime to make a delicious seasoning for grilled fish.
  • Chop cilantro and mix it into cooked rice with butter and lime zest.
  • Puree cilantro with roasted carrots, onion, and garlic to make a hearty soup. 

How can cilantro contribute to your dietary and health needs? What medicinal benefits of cilantro are most appealing? How can you incorporate cilantro into your diet?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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This coconut rice with salmon and cilantro sauce deserves a spot in your regular recipe rotation

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Cilantro and Salmon

Total time:

40 mins

Servings:

By Ann Maloney Recipes editor
August 26, 2020 at 9:30 a.m. EDT
Source: The Washington Post
Feature Photo Source: Unsplash, Sebastian-Coman

One of the most gratifying experiences I can have as a food writer occurs when readers send an email to tell me that a dish I’ve shared in Dinner in Minutes is now part of their regular recipe rotation. I do a little happy dance in my desk chair.

Inevitably, that recipe already is on repeat in my own kitchen because it comes together quickly and is delicious, but also has that little something extra — a surprisingly bold flavor, a touch of elegance or a sauce or component that I find myself carrying over to other dishes.

People who love to cook inevitably talk about food — a lot. If we make something delicious, we have to tell someone about it, to bring them a taste or at least share the recipe.

So, it wasn’t surprising that right after I started at The Post in December, my new colleague Olga Massov shared a recipe with me that she frequently served to her family: Coconut Rice With Salmon and Cilantro Sauce from “The Kitchen Shelf” by Rosie Reynolds and Eve O’Sullivan (Phaidon, 2016).AD

Olga lent me the cookbook, and as I read through the recipe, I thought this little number checks all the boxes. Yes, it has three parts: the rice, the fish and the sauce, but each of those parts is easily executed.

The cookbook’s full title includes this phrase: “Take a few pantry essentials, add two ingredients and make everyday eating extraordinary.” The idea is that you use common pantry ingredients with just a couple of fresh additions — in this case cilantro and fish — and you can put a scrumptious meal on the table.

Although it was written four years ago, the cookbook fits in perfectly with the way we are cooking during the pandemic — from our pantries, with minimal extra shopping.

The cookbook authors offer time-saving tips. For example, in this recipe, they suggest two ways to cook the salmon. The faster and easier way is to steam the fillets atop the rice as it cooks. If, however, you prefer a crispy salmon skin, you can allow the rice to cook on its own and pan-fry your salmon.AD

For me, however, the salmon is the least interesting thing here.

The rice cooked with softened onion, garlic and a pinch of sugar in full-fat coconut milk is creamy and divine on its own. The cilantro sauce — a whole bunch of the herb leaves whirred in a food processor with a syrup made of water, sugar and crushed red pepper flakes — goes over the rice, but I could just eat that up with a spoon.

When I realized that I have now made this dish several times and have made the rice and cilantro sauce to go with other kinds of fish, broiled shrimp and pan-fried skirt steak, I knew it was time to share it with you, too.

Ingredients

  • FOR THE RICE AND SALMON
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion (about 4 ounces), finely diced
  • 1 clove garlic, finely minced
  • 1 1/2 cups white basmati rice, rinsed until the water runs clear
  • 1 (14-ounce) can full-fat coconut milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 4 (3- to 4-ounce) skin-on salmon fillets
  • FOR THE SAUCE
  • Scant 1/2 cup water
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper, plus more as needed for serving
  • 1 large bunch fresh cilantro, leaves and tender stems, coarsely chopped
  • 4 lime wedges, for serving (optional)

Step 1

Make the rice: In a large, lidded skillet or pan, heat the oil over medium heat until shimmering. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until it softens and just starts to brown, 8 to 10 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the rice and stir to coat it in the oil. Add the coconut milk, then half-fill the empty can with water and add it to the pan. Add the salt and sugar, bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low so the mixture is at a simmer and cover the skillet.AD

Cook for 5 minutes, then uncover the pan. Carefully place the salmon fillets on top of the rice, re-cover the pot and cook until the rice is just tender, the salmon cooked, and the liquid has been absorbed, about 5 minutes more. (If the rice is not tender, but the salmon is cooked, remove the fish, re-cover the pot and continue cooking for a few minutes more.)

Step 2

Make the sauce: While the rice and salmon are cooking, in a small pan over high heat, combine the water, sugar, salt and crushed red pepper and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to medium and simmer the sauce until slightly reduced and syrupy, about 5 minutes, then remove from the heat.

Place the cilantro in a food processor and pulse to chop. Gradually pour in the syrup and pulse the cilantro until very finely chopped, and the sauce is combined. Taste and adjust the seasonings; the sauce should be slightly sweet, with a hint of heat. Add more crushed red pepper, sugar or salt, as needed.

Step 3

To serve, transfer the salmon off the rice to a plate. Gently stir the rice and divide the rice across 4 plates. Top with a salmon fillet and drizzle the sauce over. Sprinkle with additional crushed red pepper flakes, if desired, and serve with a wedge of lime, if using.

Step 4

Alternative for the salmon: If you prefer a pan-seared salmon fillet, cook it separately from the rice. Season the fish with salt and pepper. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until a drop of water sizzles when it hits the surface. Add the fillets, skin side up, and cook until just lightly browned, 1 to 2 minutes. Turn the fillets over and reduce the heat to medium. Cook until the salmon looks almost cooked through, 2 to 4 minutes; you can check using the tip of a sharp knife. You should see a slightly darker center. The cooking time will vary depending on the thickness of the fillet.AD

With either fish preparation, if you prefer to serve the salmon without the skin, it is easier to remove it after cooking the fish.

Adapted from “The Kitchen Shelf” by Rosie Reynolds and Eve O’Sullivan (Phaidon, 2016).

Tested by Ann Maloney; email questions to voraciously@washpost.com.

Browse our Recipe Finder for more than 9,000 Post-tested recipes at washingtonpost.com/recipes.

Nutrition

Calories: 619; Total Fat: 30 g; Saturated Fat: 20 g; Cholesterol: 47 mg; Sodium: 332 mg; Carbohydrates: 65 g; Dietary Fiber: 2 g; Sugars: 6 g; Protein: 24 g.

This dish is a quick, easy and delicious way to incorporate cilantro and its many medicinal benefits into your diet not to mention the other ingredients. What are your dietary needs? How can you eat healthy on the run? What other ways can you incorporate herbs, spices, fruits, vegetables and other whole foods into your diet?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Registered Dietitian vs a Nutritionist

Registered Dietitian vs. Nutritionist: The Difference Is Evidence-Based Practice

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Dietitian and a Nutritionist
Source: Whitney E. RD
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Both dietitians and nutritionist help people create a diet that suits their particular needs. So lets see what the differences are between the two. Now that we understand the differences. What questions do you have? How can a dietitian help you? How can a nutritionist help you? How could this contribute to your overall health? Which one would you prefer to work with and why?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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The Affordability of Organic

Making Organic Food Affordable

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

It has been reported that a single person will spend on average about $30 more a month buying organic. How much could one spend a month on one medication? How much more a month could one spend on one dietary supplement? Not all farmers agree that the USDA standards are strict enough. Some farmers argue that the standards have been eroding to compensate for corporate industrial farmers who want to use the organic label. But, we know, as informed consumers who read Shidonna Raven Garden & Cook regularly, that not all ingredients have to be organic just because the label says organic. Some of the ingredients can be non organic. The next time you go to the grocery store read the label of 3 items you buy carefully. What did you learn about the food you buy? Is the label transparent enough about the production of the food you buy?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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White House Kitchen Garden

Inside the White House: The Kitchen Garden

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
The White House Kitchen Garden
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

The White House has an incredible garden. The Chefs got really involved and enjoyed pulling food from the garden that adorned the plates of dignitaries. Its amazing to something go from a seed to a full fledged vegetable or fruit on your plate. Do you think if you grew your own foods your children would eat more fruits and vegetables? Do you think if you ate more fruits and vegetables that your children will eat more fruits and vegetables? Do you think eating more fruits and vegetables would improve your health? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Agaricus Bisporus: Healing Mushrooms…

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=embed/B57d3ULEpUI
Breast Cancer and White Mushrooms
Source: Nutrition Facts
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

We know many people are struggling with many different diseases from the complex and server to the more simpler annoyances, so we wanted to share a little research with you to share with your care providers. We are not medical professionals nor holistic doctors. We are those who have suffered along with you in our own ways and are here to share a little of what we have learned along our journey. Richard Bray is one of our favorites. His new book, Healing Mushrooms, that hit this year (2020) is an essential resources that breaks down everything you need to know about the basics of medicinal mushrooms to how to prepare the mushrooms you need for medicinal consumption. We put it in our medicine cabinet as an essential resource and reference and we recommend you do too. Read our reviews to learn more. Bray tells us all about Agaricus Bisporus (or crimini, portobella, white button, baby bella) in his book. This mushroom is said to have healing properties (as explained and detailed in the book Healing Mushrooms):

  • Cancer
  • Antioxidant
  • Antimicrobial
  • Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Age Cognitive Function
  • Memory
  • Gut health

Read all about it in Healing Mushrooms:

As always we wish you excellent health. What is the difference between medicine management and healing foods? What is the difference from constant disease managed by medicine and a healing? Where are you: pursing your healing or managing medicine? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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The Truth about Desserts

cinnamon oat cookie shidonna raven garden and cook

The truth about desserts is that you may love them. We definitely love them. Any informed organic consumer will be the first to tell you that just because it is organic does not mean it is good and nutritious for you. In other words, an organic apple is probably better for you than a bowl of organic chessy mac. Nonetheless, they are both organic. So, let us break that down for you. The process of growing foods organically is healthier for you than growing food in non organic means. The organic growing process is true or truer to nature and the natural process of growing foods. Food that is not grown organically involves chemicals and several other food production process frowned upon by even the USDA, even with its recent criticisms from true organic growers. Once one has an organic array of foods, then from there it is best to choose those foods best for you.

When considering what to eat and diet, one should have a clear understanding of their over all and holistic health. What is beneficial to one will not be beneficial to another. A person with anemia and a person with diabetes will have totally different diet needs. There are many ways to gain an understanding of one’s overall health and one’s dietary needs. Here are a couple of ways:

  • holistic doctor
  • dietitian
  • nutritionist
  • medical professional / doctor
  • Once one has a clearer picture of their dietary needs, one can make informed and educated decisions on how to best feed their bodies what it needs to perform at its best. Diet is only part of the picture. We believe that overall health and well being involves 3 pillars:
  • Health (many health professionals also include spiritual and emotional well being in this)
  • Physical Fitness – Exercise
  • Diet

Some of you are probably saying to yourselves, “I thought this article was about desserts.” You are so right! It is. So, let us get back to the good part. Our desserts are made with organic ingredients whenever possible. If not organic then natural. We select ingredients that are good for you but not necessarily “healthy” similar to organic foods (like the apple and the chessy mac). If one has to have a dessert, our desserts are an excellent choice. Of course desserts like all other things should be eaten in moderation. If given a choice, an organic salad is probably healthier for you than an organic cookie. Love them as we do, we indulge in a dessert or two. Nonetheless, when we do we make sure that they are as good for us as they can be. Refined and processed foods such as granulated sugar and flour never make it at the top of health lists. Nonetheless, we choose organic sugars and flours. So, we invite you to indulge responsibly by shopping our desserts (cookies, bars and squares).

What foods, or more specifically vitamins and minerals, are an important part of your diet? Why? What are your health needs? Do you have a chronic illness? The bible speaks clearly to us about healing. Chronic illnesses can cause other illnesses because your body is in a state of constant disease. Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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Harvesting, Cooking & Eating Swiss Chard

Growing and harvesting Swiss Chard is a tremendous joy. But, eating the fruit of one’s labor must be the best part. Today we clipped some Swiss Chard fresh from the garden and made a lamb and swiss chard warp with it the same day. It does not get fresher than that! We harvested Swiss Chard by clipping a third of its leaves and clipping from the outside. Plants such as lettuces tend to grow from the inside leaving the mature leaves on the outside. Also one should leave leaves on the plant such as these (also herbs) so they can continue to photosynthesize and grow more leaves.

I harvested these leaves which were used in a lamb, salmon and vegetable wrap. We hear that the harvest was delicious. What are the benefits of eating fresh foods? What are the benefits of growing your foods organically? How can you and yours benefit from growing and harvesting your own foods? Share your comments with the community. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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How to buy food

vitamin d sun shidonna raven garden and cook

The New Organic Grower by Eliot Coleman has been essential to us in understanding how to buy food. It also helped us understand what our food should look, how it should be produced, processed and labeled. It also left us with concerns regarding transparency in the food industry and how our foods are labeled. In this day in age where scientists seem to be making more contributions to food production and processing than farmers, Eliot’s book reminds us that the growth, not production, of food is a biological process that begins in the soil not a scientific process that begins in a lab. When we look at many of our foods and the additives as well as preservatives in them, we can see there is a reason to be concerned about the things we are knowingly or unknowingly consuming. Eliot’s book is the beginning of understanding and knowledge of food and how science has taken food production away from this biological process.

To understand how to buy food appropriately we must first begin by reading our food labels and asking questions regarding the foods we buy. How were they grown and processed? Where do they come from? How far do they come? Coleman helps us understand what organically grown food means, looks like and how it is processed. It was one of our most helpful reads and can be found below. Where do you buy your foods? Are they organic? Are they locally grown? Share your comments below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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