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Harvesting Dill

Dill Plant Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Dill was one of the plants we began early in February in our mini greenhouse aka our garage. She struggled for a while and was re-sown a few times. Eventually, dill was put outside away from the other greenhouse plants because she, along with several other plants, showed risk of disease. To prevent disease from spreading to other plants in the greenhouse we placed dill outside on the back porch in the fresh air where disease would be discouraged more given the limitations of our particular greenhouse.

She started to show some promise by sporting a couple of leaves. We then repotted her and moved her to the front porch where we could keep a closer eye on her and further away from insects. She began to flourished. She just loved being outdoors on the porch. Dill seems to be a perfect container, urban or kitchen plant. She has done very well in her pot. So, much so we could not resist harvesting a few leaves for a shrimp and lemon cream sauce dish. We used a few leaves as garnish.

Scroll up and down…learn more about greenhouses. We read this book. It helped us turn our struggling greenhouse plants around.

We learned a few lessons while harvesting. Because herbs like dill can only be harvested at about a third at a time, it is best to plant several plants or 3 times as much as you would want to harvest at one time. The plant needs the remaining leaves to photosynthesize and continue the growing process. What do you need to start your own container plant? Just want to pick up a plant all ready to go? Shop our plants. What are the benefits of having fresh herbs on demand? Share your comments with the community by posting below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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What’s Sprouting?

Since April sprung, we have been sowing some seeds directly in the ground. We started out in doors in the mini greenhouse, so it is pretty exciting to see the plants grow directly from the ground and not in a pot. We are learning a lot about spacing when it comes to sowing seeds and may have a few crowing issues. Crowing can discourage growth. One plant will typically dominate and grow while the other plants will not survive and have enough resources to grow in a crowded environment. Yet, we sow on and observe learning from our experiences.

So far we have identified Carrot, Chamomile & Dill have sprouted from being sown directly in the ground. Roots like Carrots, Radish and Beets will be very interesting for us to grow, observe and harvest since they are underground and a little more difficult to observe. Herbs can grow quit large when not hindered by pots and other containers. So, we are hoping to see the herbs in a whole different light now that we have them outside in the ground with plenty of space for their roots. There are a lot of plants that just did not do well in our garage, which we also refer to as our mini greenhouse. The garage presented many challenges such as being, what we believe, mold loving. The mini greenhouse also had a lack of good air flow and limited sun light. The Soil Blocks allowed us to sow a lot more seedlings with a lot less space once they were out of their pots. We attempted to rid the plants of any mold in their environment by cleaning the pots individually with a bleach and water solution. However, we think some unseen mold still remained leaving disease lingering among the plants. So we moved all the old seedlings out and brought in the Soil Blocks along with some fresh air. We think it is helping. But, as with anything we need to give it time to see results. I can see from the newly sown or re sown sprouts that the sprouts themselves are a lot bigger, healthier and stronger looking.

How can you help your seedlings grow in their tender state when you cannot see them yet? How can you identify when your plants is beginning to get in trouble? What ways can you nip disease and pest problems in the bud assuring a fruitful harvest? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.