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12 Proven Health Benefits of Avocado

Source: Health Line
The avocado is a rather unique fruit.

While most fruit consists primarily of carbohydrate, avocado is high in healthy fats.

Numerous studies show that it has powerful health benefits.

Here are 12 health benefits of avocado that are supported by scientific research.

1. Avocado Is Incredibly Nutritious

Source: Health Line
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Avocado is the fruit of the avocado tree, scientifically known as Persea americana (1Trusted Source).

This fruit is prized for its high nutrient value and is added to various dishes due to its good flavor and rich texture. It is the main ingredient in guacamole.

These days, the avocado has become an incredibly popular food among health-conscious individuals. It’s often referred to as a superfood, which is not surprising given its health properties (2Trusted Source).

There are many types of avocado that vary in shape and color — from pear-shaped to round and green to black. They can also weigh anywhere from 8 ounces (220 grams) to 3 pounds (1.4 kg).

The most popular variety is the Hass avocado.

It’s often called alligator pear, which is very descriptive, as it tends to be pear-shaped and has green, bumpy skin like an alligator.

The yellow-green flesh inside the fruit is eaten, but the skin and seed are discarded.

Avocados are very nutritious and contain a wide variety of nutrients, including 20 different vitamins and minerals.

Here are some of the most abundant nutrients, in a single 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving (3):

  • Vitamin K: 26% of the daily value (DV)
  • Folate: 20% of the DV
  • Vitamin C: 17% of the DV
  • Potassium: 14% of the DV
  • Vitamin B5: 14% of the DV
  • Vitamin B6: 13% of the DV
  • Vitamin E: 10% of the DV
  • It also contains small amounts of magnesium, manganese, copper, iron, zinc, phosphorous and vitamins A, B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin) and B3 (niacin).

This is coming with 160 calories, 2 grams of protein and 15 grams of healthy fats. Although it contains 9 grams of carbs, 7 of those are fiber, so there are only 2 net carbs, making this a low-carb friendly plant food.

Avocados do not contain any cholesterol or sodium and are low in saturated fat. This is why they are favored by some experts who believe these substances are harmful, which is a debated topic, however.

SUMMARY

Avocado is a green, pear-shaped fruit often called an “alligator pear.” It is loaded with healthy fats, fiber and various important nutrients.

2. They Contain More Potassium Than Bananas

Potassium is a nutrient that most people don’t get enough of (4).

This nutrient helps maintain electrical gradients in your body’s cells and serves various important functions.

Avocados are very high in potassium. A 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving packs 14% of the recommended daily allowance (RDA), compared to 10% in bananas, which are a typical high-potassium food (5).

Several studies show that having a high potassium intake is linked to reduced blood pressure, which is a major risk factor for heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure (6Trusted Source).

SUMMARY

Potassium is an important mineral that most people don’t get enough of. Avocados are very high in potassium, which should support healthy blood pressure levels.

3. Avocado Is Loaded With Heart-Healthy Monounsaturated Fatty Acids

Avocado is a high-fat food.

In fact, 77% of the calories in it are from fat, making it one of the fattiest plant foods in existence.

But they don’t just contain any fat. The majority of the fat in avocado is oleic acid — a monounsaturated fatty acid that is also the major component of olive oil and believed to be responsible for some of its health benefits.

Oleic acid has been associated with reduced inflammation and shown to have beneficial effects on genes linked to cancer (7Trusted Source8Trusted Source9Trusted Source10Trusted Source).

The fats in avocado are also rather resistant to heat-induced oxidation, making avocado oil a healthy and safe choice for cooking.

SUMMARY

Avocados and avocado oil are high in monounsaturated oleic acid, a heart-healthy fatty acid that is believed to be one of the main reasons for the health benefits of olive oil.

4. Avocados Are Loaded With Fiber

Fiber is another nutrient that avocados are relatively rich in.

It’s indigestible plant matter that can contribute to weight loss, reduce blood sugar spikes and is strongly linked to a lower risk of many diseases (11Trusted Source12Trusted Source13Trusted Source).

distinction is often made between soluble and insoluble fiber.

Soluble fiber is known for feeding the friendly gut bacteria in your intestine, which are very important for optimal body function (14Trusted Source).

A 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving of avocado packs 7 grams of fiber, which is 27% of the RDA.

About 25% of the fiber in avocado is soluble, while 75% is insoluble (15Trusted Source).

SUMMARY

Avocados tend to be rich in fiber — about 7% by weight, which is very high compared to most other foods. Fiber may have important benefits for weight loss and metabolic health.

5. Eating Avocados Can Lower Cholesterol and Triglyceride Levels

Heart disease is the most common cause of death in the world (16Trusted Source).

It’s known that several blood markers are linked to an increased risk.

This includes cholesterol, triglycerides, inflammatory markers, blood pressure and various others.

Eight controlled studies in people have examined the effects of avocado on some of these risk factors.

These studies showed that avocados can (17Trusted Source18Trusted Source19Trusted Source20Trusted Source21Trusted Source22Trusted Source23Trusted Source):

  • Reduce total cholesterol levels significantly.
  • Reduce blood triglycerides by up to 20%.
  • Lower LDL cholesterol by up to 22%.
  • Increase HDL (the good) cholesterol by up to 11%.

One of the studies found that including avocado in a low-fat, vegetarian diet significantly improved the cholesterol profile (24Trusted Source).

Though their results are impressive, it’s important to note that all of the human studies were small and short-term, including only 13–37 people with a duration of 1–4 weeks.

SUMMARY

Numerous studies have shown that eating avocado can improve heart disease risk factors like total, “bad” LDL and “good” HDL cholesterol, as well as blood triglycerides.

6. People Who Eat Avocados Tend to Be Healthier

One study looked at the dietary habits and health of people who eat avocados.

They analyzed data from 17,567 participants in the NHANES survey in the US.

Avocado consumers were found to be much healthier than people who didn’t eat this fruit.

They had a much higher nutrient intake and were half as likely to have metabolic syndrome, a cluster of symptoms that are a major risk factor for heart disease and diabetes (25Trusted Source).

People who ate avocados regularly also weighed less, had a lower BMI and significantly less belly fat. They also had higher levels of “good” HDL cholesterol.

However, correlation does not imply causation, and there is no guarantee that the avocados caused these people to be in better health.

Therefore, this particular study doesn’t carry much weight.

SUMMARY

One dietary survey found that people who ate avocados had a much higher nutrient intake and a lower risk of metabolic syndrome.

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7. Their Fat Content May Help You Absorb Nutrients From Plant Foods

When it comes to nutrients, your intake is not the only thing that matters.

You also need to be able to absorb these nutrients — move them from your digestive tract and to your body, where they can be used.

Some nutrients are fat-soluble, meaning that they need to be combined with fat in order to be utilized.

Vitamins A, D, E and K are fat-soluble, along with antioxidants like carotenoids.

One study showed that adding avocado or avocado oil to either salad or salsa can increase antioxidant absorption 2.6- to 15-fold (26Trusted Source).

So, not only is avocado highly nutritious, it can dramatically increase the nutrient value of other plant foods that you are eating.

This is an excellent reason to always include a healthy fat source when you eat veggies. Without it, a lot of the beneficial plant nutrients will go to waste.

SUMMARY

Studies have shown that eating avocado or avocado oil with vegetables can dramatically increase the number of antioxidants you take in.

8. Avocados Are Loaded With Powerful Antioxidants That Can Protect Your Eyes

Not only do avocados increase antioxidant absorption from other foods, they are also high in antioxidants themselves.

This includes the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, which are incredibly important for eye health (27Trusted Source28).

Studies show that they’re linked to a drastically reduced risk of cataracts and macular degeneration, which are common in older adults (29Trusted Source30Trusted Source).

Therefore, eating avocados should benefit your eye health over the long term.

SUMMARY

Avocados are high in antioxidants, including lutein and zeaxanthin. These nutrients are very important for eye health and lower your risk of macular degeneration and cataracts.

9. Avocado May Help Prevent Cancer

There is limited evidence that avocado may be beneficial in cancer treatment and prevention.

Test-tube studies suggest that it may help reduce side effects of chemotherapy in human lymphocytes (31Trusted Source).

Avocado extract has also been shown to inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells in a laboratory (32Trusted Source).

However, keep in mind that these studies were done in isolated cells and don’t necessarily prove what may happen inside people. Human-based research is unavailable.

SUMMARY

Some test-tube studies have shown that nutrients in avocados may have benefits in preventing prostate cancer and lowering side effects of chemotherapy. However, human-based research is lacking.

10. Avocado Extract May Help Relieve Symptoms of Arthritis

Arthritis is a common problem in Western countries. There are many types of this condition, which are often chronic problems that people have for the rest of their lives.

Multiple studies suggest that avocado and soybean oil extracts — called avocado and soybean unsaponifiables — can reduce osteoarthritis (33Trusted Source34Trusted Source).

Whether avocados themselves have this effect remains to be seen.

SUMMARY

Studies have shown that avocado and soybean oil extracts can significantly reduce symptoms of osteoarthritis.

11. Eating Avocado May Help You Lose Weight

There is some evidence that avocados are a weight loss friendly food.

In one study, people eating avocado with a meal felt 23% more satisfied and had a 28% lower desire to eat over the next 5 hours, compared to people who did not consume this fruit (35Trusted Source).

Should this hold true in the long term, then including avocados in your diet may help you naturally eat fewer calories and make it easier for you to stick to healthy eating habits.

Avocados are also high in fiber and very low in carbs, two attributes that should help promote weight loss as well, at least in the context of a healthy, real-food-based diet.

SUMMARY

Avocados may aid weight loss by keeping you full longer and making you eat fewer calories. They’re also high in fiber and low in carbs, which may promote weight loss.

12. Avocado Is Delicious and Easy to Incorporate in Your Diet

Avocados are not only healthy, they’re also incredibly delicious and go with many types of food.

You can add them to salads and various recipes or simply scoop them out with a spoon and eat them plain.

They have a creamy, rich, fatty texture and blend well with other ingredients.

A notable mention is guacamole, which is arguably the most famous use of avocados. It includes avocado along with ingredients like salt, garlic, lime and a few others depending on the recipe.

An avocado often takes some time to ripen and should feel slightly soft when ripe. The nutrients in avocado can oxidize and turn brown soon after fleshing it, but adding lemon juice should slow down this process.

SUMMARY

Avocados have a creamy, rich, fatty texture and blend well with other ingredients. Therefore, it’s easy to add this fruit to your diet. Using lemon juice may prevent cut avocados from browning quickly.

The Bottom Line

Avocados are an excellent food, loaded with nutrients, many of which are lacking in the modern diet.

They’re weight loss friendly, heart healthy and, last but not least, taste incredible.

What did you learn about avocados? How could they contribute to your health? How can you introduce them into your diet?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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THE HUNGRY SWIMMER: WHAT I EAT IN A DAY AS A ‘SWAMMER’

If you’re still lost on what to eat as a former swimmer, check out some meal ideas below as I walk you through what I eat in a typical day as a swammer! Current photo via Zoe Gregorace

The Hungry Swimmer: What I Eat in a Day as a ‘Swammer’
Source: Swim Swam
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

TW: disordered eating  

Swimmers are notorious for being big-time eaters. I mean, grueling practices and dry-land workouts definitely work up a massive appetite! And of course, as a high performance athlete, it’s imperative to give your body the fuel it needs to complete all that yardage. But, what happens after you hang up the goggles?…

Throughout my 16 year career as a competitive swimmer, my relationship with food was complicated. Food was constantly on my mind and my thoughts revolved around what and how much I would eat before practice, after practice, before the meet warm-up, in between prelims and finals, etc. It is also worth noting that as an athlete, my relationship with food not only evolved but was shaped by a variety of factors. From middle school to high school and well into college, this relationship looked completely different. The accumulative pressure of societal expectations, peer comparison and anxieties associated with growing up took a major toll, impacting the quantity and quality of food I consumed and affecting my performance as an athlete.

After I hung up the goggles in 2018, I was confronted with the single most dreaded thought of (most likely) every swimmer: Am I going to get FAT?!?

Well, I am here to report that this is certainly not the case, in fact, I am excited to share some newfound wisdom with you all as an almost 3-year swammer. After shedding my identity as a swimmer and leaping into a completely new world with a lot less chlorine, I will be the first to admit that the swammer road was quite a difficult one to navigate. Yes, I felt lost at first, but was excited to continue exploring my passion for competitive physical activity (think cross fit, spin and boxing). And while my career in the pool had come to an end, I was able to think more about my relationship with food and rebuild. I’ve learned to appreciate and listen to my swammer body, discover the foods that make me feel my best and avoid peer comparison. It is important to remember that every person is unique and the corny saying rings true, comparison IS the thief of joy.

So, you’re still lost on what to eat as a swammer? Check out some meal ideas below as I walk you through what I eat in a typical day as a swammer!

Breakfast

Soure: Swim Swam
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

9:30 AM: Right now, I am on a HUGE avocado toast kick and I’ve been loving sourdough bread. I like to toast the sourdough until it’s nice and crispy then mash the avocado on top and add a tiny drizzle of olive oil on top before adding my seasoning. My avocado toast seasoning preferences are always changing, but I can promise you that the Everything But the Bagel seasoning and red pepper flakes will never go out of style. As for the eggs, I alternate between preparing them over easy or sunny-side up. I also love adding some greens to boost the nutritional density of the meal- today I sauteed a big handful of baby spinach along with the eggs. If you want to spice things up, I highly recommend topping your toast masterpiece with a generous drizzle of your favorite hot sauce. Along with this beautiful plate, I had two cups of drip coffee with a splash of almond milk.

Lunch

Source: Swim Swam
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

1:00PM: I’m not a huge fan of lunch, but when I’m feeling it, I like to make a vibrant greens bowl with filling healthy fats and added nuts or berries for a burst of flavor. For this bowl, I combined baby spinach, sliced cucumbers, drained and rinsed chickpeas, a few slices of avocado (can you tell, I’m addicted!), some pumpkin seeds and pomegranate seeds. I mostly went for the leftover produce I had in my fridge and took advantage of this opportunity to exercise some culinary exploration! And to my surprise, this flavor combination “slaps”, as the kids say. I finished the bowl off with a drizzle of olive oil and some cracked black pepper.

Snack

Source: Swim Swam
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

3:30PM: This limbo time between lunch and dinner is what I like to call snack time! If you know me, you know thatI have a serious sweet tooth. So, instead of daydreaming about chocolate and completely cutting it out of my diet, I allow myself to enjoy it without going overboard. I typically like to make a snack mix and munch on this a few hours before I make my dinner. For this mix, I combined my favorite gluten-free pretzels (the crunch on these are INSANE), pumpkin seeds, roasted chickpea snacks and dark chocolate chips.

Dinner

Source: Swim Swam
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

6:30PM: Salmon and a bunch of roasted vegetables is one of my favorite dinners to prepare! It’s easy, quick and nutritious. I’ll either plate the salmon and veggies or, layer this on top of a big bowl of greens if I have them on hand. For this bowl, I started with a base of baby spinach and added roasted bell peppers, mushrooms, Brussels sprouts and salmon. I also added some feta cheese, hummus, a drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkle of paprika on top.

After dinner, sometimes I’m still hungry. And even if it is “late” or close to bedtime, I will listen to my body and eat if I’m hungry! I typically go for a yogurt bowl, some form of nut butter on toast or reach for a sweet-tooth satisfier I have on hand (the Chewy Peanut Butter Dark Chocolate Cups are my favorite!)

Check out my page for more recipe inspiration and be sure to share your swammer eats with me @whatzoeeeats (https://www.instagram.com/whatzoeeeats/).

Avocados are one of our favorites too. What did you think of Zoe’s meals? What did you like? How could this be beneficial to your diet?

<strong>Zoe Gregorace</strong>
Zoe Gregorace

Zoe Gregorace is currently studying Nutrition Policy at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and recently graduated from Tufts University, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology and was a proud member of the Tufts Swimming and Diving team (Go Jumbos!). During her 16 year career as a competitive swimmer, she developed a passion for sports nutrition. She enjoys writing on the topic of nutrition, health and wellness and posts her meal creations on her Instagram page @whatzoeeeats. As a former college swimmer, she strives to share recipes and nutrition tips to promote balanced eating and optimize sports performance.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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Are Raisins Good for You?

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Raisins Grapes

Source: Healthine
Feature Photo Source: Unsplash, Leander Neumann

What are raisins?

The shriveled yellow, brown, or purple morsels known as raisins are actually grapes that have been dried in the sun or in a food dehydrator.

Raisins are commonly used:
  • as a salad topping
  • mixed into oatmeal
  • in yogurt
  • in granola or cereal

You also may have eaten them baked into delicious cookies, breads, and muffins. Despite their small size, raisins are packed with energy and rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

Raisins are naturally sweet and high in sugar and calories, but they’re beneficial to our health when eaten in moderation. In fact, raisins can aid digestion, boost iron levels, and keep your bones strong.

So the next time you’re craving candy or sweets, consider munching on some raisins to satisfy your yearning. Your body will reap the healthy benefits.

The nutrition of raisins

There are several factors to consider about the nutritional benefits of raisins. Read on for a breakdown of what raisins have to offer, both good and bad, to determine if the benefits outweigh any risks.

Sugar and calories

One-half cup of raisins has about 217 caloriesTrusted Source and 47 grams of sugar. For reference, a 12-ounce can of soda has about 150 calories and 33 grams of sugar, depending on the brand.

For this reason, raisins aren’t exactly a low-calorie, or low-sugar treat. It’s no wonder they are sometimes referred to as “nature’s candy.”

High amounts of sugar and calories are pretty typical of dried fruit, which is why keeping an eye on how many raisins you are eating in one sitting is key.

Raisins are often sold in small, single serving boxes, each containing roughly 100 calories. If you have problems with portion control, try purchasing these prepackaged raisins to keep your intake in check.

For endurance athletes, raisins are a great alternative for expensive sports chews and gels. They offer a quick source of much-needed carbohydrates and can help improve your performance.

2011 studyTrusted Source found that raisins were just as effective as a brand of sports jelly beans in improving performance for athletes engaging in moderate- to high-intensity endurance exercise.

Fiber

One-half cup of raisins will give you 3.3 grams of fiberTrusted Source, or roughly 10 to 24 percent of your daily needs, depending on your age and gender.

Fiber helps aid your digestion by softening and increasing the weight and size of your stool. Bulkier stools are easier to pass and can help prevent constipation.

Fiber also helps keep you full for longer because it slows down the emptying of your stomach. If you’re trying to lose weight, eating fibrous foods may help.

Fiber also plays a role in cholesterol levels. Dietary fiber is known to decrease levels of the “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) type of cholesterol.

Iron

Raisins are a good source of iron. One-half cup of raisins contains 1.3 milligrams of iron. That’s about 7 percent of the recommended daily amountTrusted Source for most adult females, and 16 percent for adult men.

Iron is important for making red blood cells and helping them carry oxygen to the cells of your body. You need to eat enough iron in order to prevent iron-deficiency anemia.

Calcium and boron

Raisins have about 45 milligrams of calcium per 1/2-cup serving. This translates to about 4 percent of your daily needs. Calcium is essential for healthy and strong bones and teeth.

If you’re a postmenopausal woman, raisins are a great snack for you because the calcium helps prevent the development of osteoporosis, a disorder characterized by bone loss that usually occurs as you age.

To add to that, raisins contain a high amount of the trace element boron. Boron works with vitamin D and calcium to keep your bones and joints healthy. It also plays a role in treating osteoporosis.

Antioxidants

Raisins are an exceptional source of naturally occurring chemicals called phytonutrients, such as phenols and polyphenols. These types of nutrients are considered antioxidants.

Antioxidants help remove free radicals from your blood and may prevent damage to your cells and DNA. This can lead to diseases like cancerheart disease, and stroke.

Antimicrobial compounds

2009 studyTrusted Source noted that raisins contain phytochemicals that could promote healthy teeth and gums. Phytochemicals present in raisins, including oleanolic acid, linoleic acid, and linolenic acid, fight the bacteria in your mouth that lead to cavities.

In other words, eating raisins in place of sugary snack foods can actually keep your smile healthy.HEALTHLINE NEWSLETTERGet our weekly Men’s Health email

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How to eat raisins

Raisins can be enjoyed right from the box, or they can be thrown into a variety of dishes. From breakfasts to desserts to savory dinners, there are countless possibilities. Here are some ideas on how to incorporate more raisins in your diet:

  • For a healthy take on classic oatmeal raisin cookies, try this flourless version. View the recipe.
  • Raisins add excellent flavor to just about any type of sweet spread. Try making this cinnamon raisin cashew butter if you’re in the mood to try something new. If cashews aren’t your favorite, you can substitute another nut. View the recipe.
  • Spice up chicken salad with raisins and sweet apples. View the recipe.
  • Contrary to popular belief, granola is easy to make at home. Raisins are always an excellent addition to your standard granola recipe. This recipe for cinnamon raisin granola can also be made vegan or gluten-free. View the recipe.
  • Pumpkin, raisin, and flaxseed muffins are full of healthy fiber. View the recipe.
  • It may seem strange to add raisins to your pasta. This pasta dish from the staff at the Mayo Clinic includes spinach, garbanzo beans, and raisins. It’s high in iron, protein, and fiber. View the recipe.

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Make your own raisins

Want to try making your own raisins? It’s simple:

  1. Get some grapes.
  2. Remove the large stems.
  3. Wash them in cool water.
  4. Place them on a tray, and set the tray outside on a dry, sunny day (it works best if the tray has holes or cracks for air circulation).
  5. Rotate the grapes to ensure even sun exposure.

In just two or three days, you’ll have your own raisins.

Next steps

Raisins contain healthy vitamins and minerals. They are also fat-free and cholesterol-free, high in antioxidants, and an excellent source of fiber. Raisins may help you:

  • relieve constipation
  • prevent anemia
  • build and maintain strong bones
  • protect your teeth
  • lower your risk of cancer and heart disease

Raisins contain enough sugar to give you a burst of energy and are a great addition to a healthful diet for most people. If you’ve got a sweet tooth, consider replacing unhealthy, sugary snacks with raisins.

Of course, like any dried fruit, eating too much can be borderline unhealthy because of their high sugar content and calories. While you shouldn’t be afraid to include raisins in your diet, make sure to keep it to a handful at a time.


Jacquelyn Cafasso
Jacquelyn Cafasso

Jacquelyn has been in a writer and research analyst in the health and pharmaceutical space since she graduated with a degree in biology from Cornell University. A native of Long Island, NY, she moved to San Francisco after college, and then took a brief hiatus to travel the world. In 2015, Jacquelyn relocated from sunny California to sunnier Gainesville, Florida, where she owns 7 acres and 58 fruit trees. She loves chocolate, pizza, hiking, yoga, soccer, and Brazilian capoeira. Connect with her on LinkedIn.

What medicinal benefits can you reap from raisins? Have you considered eating raisins as a quick and health snack? How could your health and diet benefit from eating raisins?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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Meet Chef Ponder

Chef J Ponder Talks Cutthroat Kitchen

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Source: Chef Ponder
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Have you seen Chef Ponder on cutthroat or the food network? What do you think about all the time it takes to produce a 30 minute show? What can we learn about food from chefs?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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Chef J. Ponder: Culinary Hero

Source: Soul Vision Magazine
Photos courtesy of Chef J. Ponder

“Use your knowledge and expertise to help those who need it the most.”

When he was coming up, Chef Jacoby Ponder watched his strong, independent grandmother maintain and sustain a small farm in rural Monroe, Georgia. He watched her plant and harvest fresh vegetables—sweet potatoes, collard greens, and cabbages. He saw how she would wash off the red Georgia clay and use these vegetables to create something hearty for supper. “I unknowingly became her apprentice,” he says. “My craft is literally rooted with three main ingredients: love, passion, and flavor.”

Chef J. Ponder w/ members of his Chefpreneur Academy.

Ponder has made dishes for President George H.W. Bush, Vivica A. Fox, and others. He has also appeared on the Food Network’s Chopped and Cutthroat Kitchen. In 2012, he was a finalist on Chopped. In 2014, he won Cutthroat Kitchen twice. Ponder served ten years in the U.S. Navy as a personal and private chef. Many years after his military service, he continues to use his gifts to help veterans and those on active duty. “My educational venture, Chefpreneur Academy, is a transitional training course that benefits both veterans and those on active duty,” he explains. “I teach and train personal development techniques as well as business savvy techniques on how to become an owner and not just a cook.”

Ponder is now working on his culinary series — Food for the Rich — where he highlights the delicious cuisine he cooks for some of his high-profile clients in their beautiful homes. He also has a brunch series called EAT.SIP.SOCIAL which includes the “Chef’s Table.”  “It’s neat and new. Think concepts surrounding whimsical culinary favorites with coaching and very cool urban vibes,” he says. You can see the Chef’s video series on the brand-new streaming service, SoulVision.TV, which will launch this Valentine’s Day, February 14.

“My craft is literally rooted with three main ingredients: love, passion, and flavor.”

Ponder is looking forward to seeing where his gifts and passion take him. “I plan to continue to press the culinary envelope and figure out some way to show the world who I am as a true culinarian,” he says. He wants to join the Soulidifly Family very soon. “I hope it will come to fruition.” Chef Ponder will continue to use his culinary and communication skills to help people eat and live right.

https://player.vimeo.com/video/388694815
Chef J. Ponder’s EAT.SIP.SOCIAL will be featured on SoulVision.TV.

To learn more about Chef J. Ponder, you can visit his website chefjacobyponder.com and follow him on Facebook @ChefJacobyPonder and Instagram @chefjponder.

When you eat out where do you like to dine? What do you like about celebrity chefs? Have you seen Chef Ponder on Soul Vision TV?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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How to Grow Vegetables Indoors in a Pot

How to Grow Vegetables Indoors in a Pot

Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook
Source: E How Home
Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

What will you grow inside this season? How can you use them as decoration for your home? What do you like to eat year round?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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10 Health Benefits of Kale

Healthline

Source: Healthline
Feature Photo Source: Healthline
Of all the super healthy greens, kale is king.

It is definitely one of the healthiest and most nutritious plant foods in existence.

Kale is loaded with all sorts of beneficial compounds, some of which have powerful medicinal properties.

Here are 10 health benefits of kale that are supported by science.

1. Kale Is Among The Most Nutrient-Dense Foods on The Planet

Kale is a popular vegetable and a member of the cabbage family.

It is a cruciferous vegetable like cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, collard greens and Brussels sprouts.

There are many different types of kale. The leaves can be green or purple, and have either a smooth or curly shape.

The most common type of kale is called curly kale or Scots kale, which has green and curly leaves and a hard, fibrous stem.

A single cup of raw kale (about 67 grams or 2.4 ounces) contains (1):

  • Vitamin A: 206% of the DV (from beta-carotene)
  • Vitamin K: 684% of the DV
  • Vitamin C: 134% of the DV
  • Vitamin B6: 9% of the DV
  • Manganese: 26% of the DV
  • Calcium: 9% of the DV
  • Copper: 10% of the DV
  • Potassium: 9% of the DV
  • Magnesium: 6% of the DV
  • It also contains 3% or more of the DV for vitamin B1 (thiamin), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B3 (niacin), iron and phosphorus

This is coming with a total of 33 calories, 6 grams of carbs (2 of which are fiber) and 3 grams of protein.

Kale contains very little fat, but a large portion of the fat in it is an omega-3 fatty acid called alpha linolenic-acid.

Given its incredibly low calorie content, kale is among the most nutrient-dense foods in existence. Eating more kale is a great way to dramatically increase the total nutrient content of your diet.

SUMMARY

Kale is very high in nutrients and very low in calories, making it one of the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet.

2. Kale Is Loaded With Powerful Antioxidants Like Quercetin and Kaempferol

Kale, like other leafy greens, is very high in antioxidants.

These include beta-carotene and vitamin C, as well as various flavonoids and polyphenols (2Trusted Source).

Antioxidants are substances that help counteract oxidative damage by free radicals in the body (3Trusted Source).

Oxidative damage is believed to be among the leading drivers of aging and many diseases, including cancer (4).

But many substances that happen to be antioxidants also have other important functions.

This includes the flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol, which are found in relatively large amounts in kale (5Trusted Source).

These substances have been studied thoroughly in test tubes and animals.

They have powerful heart-protective, blood pressure-lowering, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, anti-depressant and anti-cancer effects, to name a few (6Trusted Source7Trusted Source8Trusted Source).

SUMMARY

Many powerful antioxidants are found in kale, including quercetin and kaempferol, which have numerous beneficial effects on health.

3. It Is an Excellent Source of Vitamin C

Vitamin C is an important water-soluble antioxidant that serves many vital functions in the body’s cells.

For example, it is necessary for the synthesis of collagen, the most abundant structural protein in the body.

Kale is much higher in vitamin C than most other vegetables, containing about 4.5 times much as spinach (9).

The truth is, kale is actually one of the world’s best sources of vitamin C. A cup of raw kale contains even more vitamin C than a whole orange (10).

SUMMARY

Kale is extremely high in vitamin C, an antioxidant that has many important roles in the body. A single cup of raw kale actually contains more vitamin C than an orange.

4. Kale Can Help Lower Cholesterol, Which May Reduce The Risk of Heart Disease

Cholesterol has many important functions in the body.

For instance, it is used to make bile acids, which is are substances that help the body digest fats.

The liver turns cholesterol into bile acids, which are then released into the digestive system whenever you eat a fatty meal.

When all the fat has been absorbed and the bile acids have served their purpose, they are reabsorbed into the bloodstream and used again.

Substances called bile acid sequestrants can bind bile acids in the digestive system and prevent them from being reabsorbed. This reduces the total amount of cholesterol in the body.

Kale actually contains bile acid sequestrants, which can lower cholesterol levels. This might lead to a reduced risk of heart disease over time (11).

One study found that drinking kale juice every day for 12 weeks increased HDL (the “good”) cholesterol by 27% and lowered LDL levels by 10%, while also improving antioxidant status (12).

According to one study, steaming kale dramatically increases the bile acid binding effect. Steamed kale is actually 43% as potent as cholestyramine, a cholesterol-lowering drug that functions in a similar way (13).

SUMMARY

Kale contains substances that bind bile acids and lower cholesterol levels in the body. Steamed kale is particularly effective.

5. Kale Is One of The World’s Best Sources of Vitamin K

Vitamin K is an important nutrient.

It is absolutely critical for blood clotting, and does this by “activating” certain proteins and giving them the ability to bind calcium.

The well-known anticoagulant drug Warfarin actually works by blocking the function of this vitamin.

Kale is one of the world’s best sources of vitamin K, with a single raw cup containing almost 7 times the recommended daily amount.

The form of vitamin K in kale is K1, which is different than vitamin K2. K2 is found in fermented soy foods and certain animal products. It helps prevent heart disease and osteoporosis (14).

SUMMARY

Vitamin K is an important nutrient that is involved in blood clotting. A single cup of kale contains 7 times the RDA for vitamin K.

6. There Are Numerous Cancer-Fighting Substances in Kale

Cancer is a terrible disease characterized by the uncontrolled growth of cells.

Kale is actually loaded with compounds that are believed to have protective effects against cancer.

One of these is sulforaphane, a substance that has been shown to help fight the formation of cancer at the molecular level (1516Trusted Source17Trusted Source18).

It also contains a indole-3-carbinol, another substance that is believed to help prevent cancer (19Trusted Source).

Studies have shown that cruciferous vegetables (including kale) may significantly lower the risk of several cancers, although the evidence in humans is mixed (20Trusted Source21Trusted Source).

SUMMARY

Kale contains substances that have been shown to help fight cancer in test-tube and animal studies, but the human evidence is mixed.

7. Kale Is Very High in Beta-Carotene

Kale is often claimed to be high in vitamin A, but this is not entirely accurate.

It is actually high in beta-carotene, an antioxidant that the body can turn into vitamin A (22Trusted Source).

For this reason, kale can be an effective way to increase your body’s levels of this very important vitamin (23Trusted Source).

SUMMARY

Kale is very high in beta-carotene, an antioxidant that the body can turn into vitamin A.

8. Kale Is a Good Source of Minerals That Most People Don’t Get Enough Of

Kale is high in minerals, some of which many people are deficient in.

It is a good plant-based source of calcium, a nutrient that is very important for bone health and plays a role in all sorts of cellular functions.

It is also a decent source of magnesium, an incredibly important mineral that most people don’t get enough of. Eating plenty of magnesium may be protective against type 2 diabetes and heart disease (24).

Kale also contains quite a bit of potassium, a mineral that helps maintain electrical gradients in the body’s cells. Adequate potassium intake has been linked to reduced blood pressure and a lower risk of heart disease (25Trusted Source).

One advantage that kale has over leafy greens like spinach is that it is low in oxalate, a substance found in some plants that can prevent minerals from being absorbed (26).

SUMMARY

Many important minerals are found in kale, some of which are generally lacking in the modern diet. These include calcium, potassium and magnesium.

9. Kale Is High in Lutein and Zeaxanthin, Powerful Nutrients That Protect the Eyes

One of the most common consequences of aging is that eyesight gets worse.

Fortunately, there are several nutrients in the diet that can help prevent this from happening.

Two of the main ones are lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoid antioxidants that are found in large amounts in kale and some other foods.

Many studies have shown that people who eat enough lutein and zeaxanthin have a much lower risk of macular degeneration and cataracts, two very common eye disorders (27Trusted Source28Trusted Source).

SUMMARY

Kale is high in lutein and zeaxanthin, nutrients that have been linked to a drastically reduced risk of macular degeneration and cataracts.

10. Kale Should Be Able to Help You Lose Weight

Kale has several properties that make it a weight loss friendly food.

It is very low in calories but still provides significant bulk that should help you feel full.

Because of the low calorie and high water content, kale has a low energy density. Eating plenty of foods with a low energy density has been shown to aid weight loss in numerous studies (29Trusted Source30Trusted Source).

Kale also contains small amounts of protein and fiber. These are two of the most important nutrients when it comes to losing weight.

Although there is no study directly testing the effects of kale on weight loss, it makes sense that it could be a useful addition to a weight loss diet.

SUMMARY

As a nutrient-dense, low-calorie food, kale makes an excellent addition to a weight loss diet.

The Bottom Line

Fortunately, adding kale to your diet is relatively simple. You can simply add it to your salads or use it in recipes.

A popular snack is kale chips, where you drizzle some extra virgin olive oil or avocado oil on your kale, add some salt and then bake in it an oven until dry.

It tastes absolutely delicious and makes a great crunchy, super healthy snack.

A lot of people also add kale to their smoothies in order to boost the nutritional value.

At the end of the day, kale is definitely one of the healthiest and most nutritious foods on the planet.

If you want to dramatically boost the amount of nutrients you take in, consider loading up on kale.

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29 nutrition tips for better health and longevity

salad with cooked garden fresh beans shidonna raven

Source: Medical News Today


Good nutrition is a critical part of health and development. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), better nutrition is related to improved health at all ages, a lower risk of diseases, and longevity.

People can find it difficult or confusing to navigate the amount of nutrition information now available, and many sources have differing views.

This article offers science-based nutrition tips to help someone lead a healthier lifestyle.

Nutrition tips for diet

Following these nutrition tips will help a person make healthy food choices.

1. Include protein with every meal

Including some protein with every meal can help balance blood sugar.

Some studies suggest higher protein diets can be beneficial for type 2 diabetes.

Other research indicates balancing blood sugar can support weight management and cardiovascular health.

2. Eat oily fish

According to research, omega-3 fatty acids in oily fish are essential for cell signaling, gene expression, and brain and eye development.

Some studies indicate that omega-3 fatty acids can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Other research suggests the anti-inflammatory properties of omega-3 may effectively manage the early stages of degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease.

3. Eat whole grains

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommend people eat whole grains rather than refined grains.

Whole grains contain nutrients such as B vitamins, iron, and fiber. These nutrients are essential for body functions that include carrying oxygen in the blood, regulating the immune system, and balancing blood sugar.

4. Eat a rainbow

The saying ‘eat a rainbow’ helps remind people to eat different colored fruits and vegetables.

Varying the color of plant foods means that someone gets a wide variety of antioxidants beneficial to health, for example, carotenoids and anthocyanins.

5. Eat your greens

Dark green leafy vegetables are a great source of nutrition, according to the Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Leafy greens are rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

The USDA suggest that folate in leafy greens may help protect against cancer, while vitamin K helps prevent osteoporosis.

6. Include healthful fats

People should limit their intake of saturated fats while avoiding trans fats, according to the USDA.

A person can replace these fats with unsaturated fats, which they can find in foods such as avocado, oily fish, and vegetable oils.

7. Use extra virgin olive oil

As part of the Mediterranean diet, extra virgin olive oil has benefits to the heart, blood pressure, and weight, according to a 2018 health report.

A person can include extra virgin olive oil in their diet by adding it to salads or vegetables or cooking food at low temperatures.

8. Eat nuts

According to the AHA, eating one serving of nuts daily in place of red or processed meat, french fries, or dessert may benefit health and prevent long-term weight gain.

The AHA suggest that Brazil nuts, in particular, may help someone feel fuller and stabilize their blood sugar.

9. Get enough fiber

According to the AHA, fiber can help improve blood cholesterol levels and lower the risk of heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

People can get enough fiber in their diet by eating whole grains, vegetables, beans, and pulses.

10. Increase plant foods

Research suggests that plant-based diets may help prevent overweight and obesity. Doctors associate obesity with many diseases.

According to some studies, including more plant foods in the diet could reduce the risk of developing diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

11. Try beans and pulses

Beans and pulses are a good source of protein for people on a plant-based diet. However, those who eat meat can eat them on a few meat-free days a week.

Beans and pulses also contain beneficial fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

Some research even says pulses may help people feel fuller and lose weight.

Nutrition tips for what to drink

Drinking plenty of healthy fluids has numerous health benefits. Health experts recommend these tips:

12. Drink water

Drinking enough water every day is good for overall health and can help manage body weight, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Drinking water can prevent dehydration, which can be a particular risk for older adults.

If someone does not like plain water, they can add some citrus slices and mint leaves to increase the appeal, or drink herbal teas.

13. Enjoy coffee

2017 study suggests that moderate coffee consumption of 3–5 cups a day can reduce the risk of:

  • type 2 diabetes
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • cardiovascular diseases

According to the same review, the recommended amount reduces to 2 cups per day for pregnant and lactating people.

14. Drink herbal teas

According to research, catechins in green, black, and other herbal teas may have antimicrobial properties.

Herbal teas, such as mint, chamomile, and rooibos, are caffeine-free and help keep someone hydrated throughout the day.READER SURVEYPlease take a quick 1-minute survey

Nutrition tips for foods and drinks to avoid

It is important to cut back on food and drink that may have harmful health consequences. For example, a person may want to:

15. Reduce sugar

According to research, dietary sugar, dextrose, and high fructose corn syrup may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome.

People should look out for hidden sugars in foods that manufacturers label as names ending in “-ose,” for example, fructose, sucrose, and glucose.

Natural sugars, such as honey and maple syrup, could also contribute to weight gain if someone eats them too often.

16. Drink alcohol in moderation

Dietary Guidelines For Americans recommend that if someone consumes alcohol, it should be in moderation.

They advise up to one drink per day for females and up to two drinks per day for males.

Excessive drinking increases the risk of chronic diseases and violence, and over time, can impair short and long-term cognitive function.

17. Avoid sugary drinks

The CDC associate frequently drinking sugary drinks with:

  • weight gain and obesity
  • type 2 diabetes
  • heart disease
  • kidney disease
  • non-alcoholic liver disease
  • tooth decay and cavities
  • gout, a type of arthritis

People should limit their consumption of sugary drinks and preferably drink water instead.

18. Eat less red and processed meat

A large prospective study in the British Medical Journal indicates that U.S. adults eating more red and processed meat had higher mortality rates.

Participants who swapped meat for other protein sources, such as fish, nuts, and eggs, had a lower risk of death in the eight-year study period.

19. Avoid processed foods

According to a review in Nutrients, eating ultra-processed foods can increase the risk of many diseases, including cancer, irritable bowel syndrome, and depression.

People should instead consume whole foods and avoid foods with long lists of processed ingredients.MEDICAL NEWS TODAY NEWSLETTERStay in the know. Get our free daily newsletter

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Other good health habits

There are several steps a person can take to improve their health in addition to consuming healthful foods and drinks.

20. Support your microbiome

A 2019 review in Nutrients suggests that a high quality, balanced diet supports microbial diversity and can influence the risk of chronic diseases.

The authors indicate that including vegetables and fiber are beneficial to the microbiome. Conversely, eating too many refined carbohydrates and sugars is detrimental.

21. Consider a vitamin D supplement

The recommended dietary allowance for vitamin D is 15 micrograms or 600 international units per day for adults.

Many people get some of their vitamin D from sunlight, while it is also in some foods.

People with darker skin, older adults, and those who get less exposure to sunlight — such as during winter or in less sunny climates — may need to take a vitamin D supplement.

22. Be aware of portion size

Being aware of portion sizes can help people manage their weight and diet.

The USDA have helpful information about portion sizes for different food patterns.

People can adapt the guidelines to suit their cultural or personal preferences.

23. Use herbs and spices

Using herbs and spices in cooking can liven up a meal and have additional health benefits.

2019 review suggests that the active compounds in ginger may help prevent oxidative stress and inflammation that occurs as part of aging.

Curcumin in turmeric is anti-inflammatory and may have protective effects on health, according to research.

Garlic has many benefits, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties.

24. Give your body a rest by fasting

Intermittent fasting involves not eating either overnight or some days of the week. This may reduce energy intake and can have health benefits.

According to a 2020 review, intermittent fasting may improve blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and heart health.

25. Keep a food journal

The American Society for Nutrition say that keeping a food journal can help people track calories, see how much they are eating, and recognize food habits.

Keeping a food journal could help someone who wants to maintain a moderate weight or eat a more healthful diet.

Apps, such as MyFitnessPal, can also help someone achieve their goals.

26. Wash fruits and vegetables

Raw fruits and vegetables can contain harmful germs that could make someone sick, according to the CDC. They advise that Salmonella, E.coli, and listeria cause a large percentage of U.S. foodborne illness.

Always wash fresh produce when eating them raw.

27. Do not microwave in plastic containers

Research suggests that microwaving food in plastic containers can release phthalates, which can disrupt hormones.

Experts recommend heating food in glass or ceramic containers that are microwave-safe.

28. Eat varied meals

Many people eat the same meals regularly. Varying foods and trying different cuisines can help someone achieve their required nutrient intake.

This can be particularly helpful when trying to eat a broader range of vegetables or protein.

29. Eat mindfully

In a 2017 study, mindful eating helped adults with obesity eat fewer sweets and manage their blood glucose.

Another study suggests mindfulness can bring greater awareness to food triggers and habits in people with diabetes.

Summary

Nutrition is an essential part of health, and people can start leading a healthful lifestyle by making small changes to their diet.

It is also important to remember other key aspects of health, such as exercise and activity, stress strategies, and adequate sleep.

How can you include these nutrients into your diet to improve your health? What did you learn? What was most helpful?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.

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The Culinary Master!

Source: Boss Up Magazine
Photos Source: Boss Up Magazine

Looking for a Chef to whip up an amazing meal at your next event?  All the way from Monroe, GA, Chef Jacoby J. Ponder is a Personal Private Chef, who is a Food Network Competitor on Chopped, and Winner of Food Network Show Cutthroat Kitchen! (We’ve got a WINNER!)

He is motivated by his daily grind of: Cook, Rest, Repeat, and has always had a passion for the Culinary and Hospitality fields.  So how did Jacoby get into being Chef? During his 10 years in the U.S. Navy, he was a “PQMS”, known as a personal chef. However, Jacoby continue to follow his passion as well as taking it up a notch!  Jacoby attended The Culinary Institute of VA. ECPI University, where he obtained an Associates in Culinary Science and a Bachelors in Food Service Management.

In 2006, he got his first big break doing a catering job for $8k (Ching! Ching!) Jacoby was proud of his first big break, as that weeks’ worth of work was completed with only his hands! (NICE!)

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The Chef I admire most is myself.  My grind never stops and no other chef will out work me!

If you’re interested in becoming a Chef, Jacoby advises: Be ready to work, none stop! stay focus on you!

Starting out however, Jacoby experienced challenges with exposure to the right markets and having really big ideas, but no support. However, this did not stop him!  With his specialty cuisine being sea food, especially Salmon, he soon became famous for his Shrimp and grits, which he calls “Shr-its.”

“The way I make it and season it, has blown minds of the people from Dc and New York and pretty much where ever I go.”

Jacoby’s exposure continued to grow as he was soon he was cooking for celebrities! Jacoby has cooked for many celebrities such as: Vivica A. Fox, Bruce Willis, House Wives of Atl., President Bush and many more! When Jacoby is not cooking his specialty, and whips up a dish requiring wine, his wine of choice is preferably a really lite crisp wine. This is due to the composition of the wine, which helps with the flavor profile of whatever sauce he is am creating.

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Jacoby is a really big advocate for Education, and has taught Culinary Science at Stratford University. Jacoby also volunteers to teach History classes at the local community center, located in Norfolk, VA (Dope right?!)  Jacoby stated that his ultimate goals as a Chef is to one day become an owner and operator of his own small restaurant in Atlanta.

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At this time, Jacoby is working on a few projects and is currently on an 18 city tour with “The Under Ground Kitchen.”  (Awesome!)  He also has a  traveling “Couples Cooking Class,” that he says he has have done pretty well with! Though he doesn’t have any cook books available yet, he will have some soon to come!

If you’re interested in booking Jacoby as your Private Chef for your upcoming event, you can book him directly at: Celebchefjponder@gmail.com

Make sure you keep up with Jacoby by following him on:

Instagram | Facebook | Twitter: Chef JPonder

Until next time…

“Boss up and Be Blessed”

☆BossUpMag |•| 11.12.17☆

Where have you seen or will you see Chef Ponder? What would you like to learn about food? Which black and minority own business do you support?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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Red Rosemary Shrimp Pasta

Oregano Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook

Feature Photo Source: Unsplash, Samee-Anderson


This simple and quick recipe is excellent for coastal Hampton Roads, Virginia. One thing that Hampton Roads does fairly well is seafood. The seafood dishes local to this area are often simple but good: often locals will steam seafood with a dash of local Old Bay seafood spice. And that is good enough. As simple as it is; it is very delicious. Our Red Rosemary Shrimp Pasta is a little more complex than the traditional local flavors of Hampton Roads, although there are some more complex dishes out there.

Red Rosemary Shrimp Pasta
Prep time: 12 minutes
Cook time 30 minutes

  • Organic Penne Pasta
  • Organic 3/4 pound shrimp (approximately 50 average size shrimp) de-shelled and de-veined
  • Organic 1/2 yellow onion
  • 1 Organic small jalapeno pepper* optional
  • Organic Salt* to taste (Pink Himalayan salt suggested)
  • Organic Pepper* to taste
  • Organic Oregano* to taste
  • 1 Organic can 15 ounces organic tomato sauce
  • 1 1/2 Cups of Organic crushed tomatoes
  • Organic Olive Oil

Boil Pasta until al dente. Drain pasta. Place aside.
Place tomato sauce and crushed tomatoes in sauce pan. Season tomato sauce with salt, pepper and oregano to taste allow to simmer for 25 minutes.
Salt, pepper and oregano shrimp and vegetables. Dice yellow onion and jalapeno pepper and saute in olive oil with cleaned shrimp. A few minutes before shrimp are fully cooked add Red Tomato sauce to shrimp and vegetables. Cook in pan for about 5 minutes and serve over pasta.
Enjoy this hearty seafood dish year around.

What are your favorite winter dishes? What are your favorite summer dishes? Why? Share them with the community.

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

If these articles have been helpful to you and yours, give a donation to Shidonna Raven Garden and Cook Ezine today.