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Fauci: US taking hard look at variant of coronavirus

Source: Associate Press

In this Dec. 22, 2020, file photo Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, prepares to receive his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, Pool, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials believe the coronavirus mutation that set off alarms in parts of Britain is no more apt to cause serious illness or be resistant to vaccines than the strain afflicting people in the United States but it still must be taken “very seriously,” the government’s top infectious disease expert said Sunday.

Dr. Anthony Fauci endorsed the decision of U.S. officials to require negative COVID-19 tests before letting people from Britain enter the U.S. He declined to weigh in on whether that step should have been taken sooner. He said the variant strain is something “to follow very carefully” and “we’re looking at it very intensively now.”

He said: “Does it make someone more ill? Is it more serious virus in the sense of virulence? And the answer is, it doesn’t appear to be that way.” British officials are telling their U.S. colleagues it appears that the vaccines being rolled out will be strong enough to deal with the new variant but, Fauci said, “we’re going to be doing the studies ourselves.”

Fauci said the U.S. is at a critical phase of the pandemic, with the worst probably still ahead. He predicted the general population would be getting immunized widely by late March or early April — beyond the front-line workers, older people and certain other segments of the public given priority for the vaccines.

Fauci spoke on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

Great Britain was the first country to give the vaccine to its citizens. Why do you think they are seeing a mutation of the corona virus? Do you think this is associated with the vaccine? Why? Why not?

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From Tuskegee to a COVID Vaccine: Diversity and Racism Are Hurdles in Drug Trials

Drug companies pushing to fight the coronavirus with a vaccine must overcome a legacy of suspicion, even as Black communities have been hit hard by the pandemic.

By Joseph P. Williams, Senior Editor
Nov. 19, 2020, at 1:35 p.m.
Source: US News

The Search for Diversity in Drug Trials

In this 1950's photo released by the National Archives, a black man included in a syphilis study has blood drawn by a doctor in Tuskegee, Ala. U.S. public health officials in the 1930s began a study in which syphilis was left untreated in Black men. Known colloquially as the Tuskegee experiment, the study didn’t end until 1972, and has become shorthand among African Americans for a legacy of racism and mistreatment in the medical industry.
Source: US News
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In this 1950s photo released by the National Archives, a Black man included in the Tuskegee syphilis study has blood drawn by a doctor in Tuskegee, Ala. The once-secret Tuskegee experiment has become shorthand among African Americans for a legacy of mistreatment in medicine.(NATIONAL ARCHIVES)

AMID A SEEMINGLY endless pandemic, as a spiraling number of COVID-19 deaths presage what could be a long, dark winter, the news broke through like thin rays of sunshine: Two American pharmaceutical giants racing to find a vaccine separately reported that human tests of their experimental drugs have shown highly promising results.

The potentially game-changing data from drug manufacturers Pfizer and Moderna, however, obscured what some say is anotherkey development: Both companies reported that the pools of volunteers receiving the drugs included significant numbers of Black participants.[ 

The inclusion of Black people in trials for a highly anticipated drug might seem like a no-brainer, particularly for a vaccine to fight COVID-19, a contagion that’s been killing Black Americans at a rate higher than whites. Indeed, PhRMA, the drug industry’s influential trade group, just announced a new set of principles that urge diversity in human trials for new drugs to boost health equity, increase participation by people of color, ensure drug effectiveness – and tackle lingering suspicion of the medical industry among some African Americans.

“Between Latinx and Black or African American populations, we’re running at about 19% or so,” Dr. Bill Gruber, Pfizer’s senior vice president of vaccine clinical research and development, told Reuters this summer, describing a trial pool of 11,000 people for a vaccine being developed with German partner BioNTech. “We’re trying to push even higher than that.”

The company appears to have improved, saying as of Monday that 30% of U.S. trial participants had “diverse” backgrounds, with Black people and those identified as either Hispanic or by the gender-neutral term Latinx accounting for approximately 10% and 13% shares, respectively. Moderna, meanwhile, said its 30,000-person phase three vaccine study included more than 11,000 people from communities of color, including more than 6,000 Hispanic or Latinx people and more than 3,000 Black or African American participants.

Yet while the industry insists it is moving with deliberate speed toward diversity and inclusion in experimental drug trials, some say it’s taking baby steps and has a long way to go toward building trust with African Americans and other minority communities.

“There are a lot of outstanding questions,” says Jonathan Jackson, a cognitive neuroscientist and director of the Community Access, Recruitment, and Engagement Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The center investigates the effects of diversity and inclusion on human subject research.

“A lot of people who have been running the COVID-19 vaccine studies have been really excited because they have recruited a more diverse population, compared to what they’re used to,” Jackson says. “The bar that you’re trying to clear shouldn’t be a study that you ran last year,” but the goal should be to mirror the population most affected by the targeted disease.

“So if those are our baselines, then what we’re seeing – even though it is a significant increase in diversity – is still nowhere near representative of COVID hospitalizations or COVID deaths,” Jackson says. “It’s hard to get excited when we still have so far to go.”

Jackson and others say the lack of diversity in medical trials has roots extending deep into U.S. history.

Dr. J. Marion Sims, onetime president of the American Medical Association and an esteemed physician dubbed “the father of modern gynecology,” made groundbreaking medical strides through research he conducted on female slaves, without anesthesia. Medical journals reportedly indicate it was common to conduct medical experiments on slaves with no pain relief; procedures ranged from amputations to brain surgery.

While research on slaves gradually faded over the decades, experiments on African Americans never completely went away.

World Braces For Another Wave of Coronavirus

In 1951, doctors at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore – though segregated, one of the only leading hospitals to treat Black patients – harvested cells from Henrietta Lacks, a Black woman being treated for cancer, without her knowledge or permission. Though such harvesting reportedly was standard at Hopkins regardless of race, Lacks’ cells were abnormally reproductive and widely shared, and her “HeLa” cells are still in use for research today.

In perhaps the most egregious example, U.S. public health officials in the 1930s began a study in which syphilis was left untreated in Black men. Known colloquially as the Tuskegee experiment, the study didn’t end until 1972, and has become shorthand among African Americans for a legacy of racism and mistreatment in the medical industry.

Facing that ugly history is part of building trust and boosting participation in clinical trials by historically underrepresented communities, according to the PhRMA industry principles, which explicitly state that the Tuskegee experiment was unethical and featured serious mistakes. Still, the industry principles state that the horrible experiment became a conduit for “major changes in how clinical trials are conducted in order to protect the rights, safety, and well-being of clinical trial participants.”

Rather than lean into diversity and inclusion in medical trials, however, experts say the industry went in the other direction. For years, it wasn’t unusual for a drug to be tested on volunteers from the pharmaceutical research community, without any people of color in the pool.

In that world, “it’s not that we struggle to recruit racial and ethnic minorities; it’s that we’re really good at recruiting one type of person into clinical research,” says Jackson, the CARES director. “And that person is usually (a) white, wealthy male, and lives in an urban center, along the East or West Coast of the United States, and has some kind of advanced educational degree.”

Decades ago, the group that was easiest to reach were poor, minority individuals that were unlikely to speak up or speak out,” he says. “Now, the group that’s easiest to reach are extremely privileged individuals” who have the means and the time to participate

Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association, says diversity in clinical trials is important for two reasons.

“One is that it’s just better science – you then get a better idea of how your drug or your vaccine or anything else works in a more representative population,” particularly among people dealing with issues tied to social determinants of health, Benjamin says. “And the other aspect is, it helps with trust” among African Americans and other marginalized populations.

The data underscores the need: As of August and compared with whites, Black people had a COVID-19 case rate nearly three times higher, were hospitalized at a rate nearly five times higher and had a death rate more than two times higher, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An APM Research Lab analysis as of Nov. 10 also shows Black Americans with a death rate close to double that of whites.

Yet recent polling indicates nearly half of African Americans are either reluctant or will refuse to get a COVID-19 vaccination. That’s despite the fact that some believe the disproportionate effects the coronavirus has had on their communities should put people of color near the front of the line for inoculation.

“Having a racial preference for a COVID-19 vaccine is not only ethically permissible, but I think it’s an ethical imperative,” Lawrence Gostin, a professor of global health law at Georgetown University, told STAT. It’s justifiable, he said, because of “historic structural racism that’s resulted in grossly unequal health outcomes for all kinds of diseases, and because COVID-19 has so disproportionately impacted the lives of people of color.”

To be sure, the racial and ethnic makeup of trial participants can vary: In 2019, for example, federal data snapshot says Blacks or African Americans – who make up about 13% of the U.S. population – accounted for 4% of participants in trials that led to the approval of 11 new oncology drugs, but for 25% of participants in trials that led to the approval of six hematology drugs and 29% in trials that led to the approval of five drugs in the psychiatry and sleep disorder category. Notably, a 2018 study indicated that African Americans were overrepresented in trials that did not require informed consent but are to be aimed at life-threatening, emergency conditions.

In its vaccine pursuit, Pfizer appeared to recognize the need for diversity and inclusion: A fact sheet sent by a company representative states that COVID-19 “is an urgent health crisis that disproportionately impacts diverse communities,” a problem that requires focused action.

The drug company’s efforts include information and ad campaigns to educate the public and recruit volunteers in “diverse” communities hit hard by COVID-19, according to the fact sheet. In addition to outreach in several languages and partnerships with grassroots community organizations, Pfizer also set up a website that shows its progress in including minorities in its vaccine trials.

“We are doing everything we can to ensure that the demographics of our trial population reflect the demographics of the states and communities that have been most impacted by COVID-19,” according to the fact sheet.

Benjamin says Pfizer and other drug manufacturers are making the right moves to increase inclusion in drug trials, including by embedding representatives in the community. Still, he says, it’s a long-term process that will yield concrete results in years, not months.

“You have to make sure you have the right people at the table,” Benjamin says. Drug companies, he says, have to “make a conscious effort” to include those affected by the disease they’re trying to cure, and “actually go to the patients and take that added step to ensure that you have a representative population” for a drug trial.

Jackson, for his part, says while the diversity numbers reported by Pfizer and Moderna are sunny, “I’m probably going to be the rain cloud.”

Outstanding questions include whether the percentages equate to the number of minorities affected by the coronavirus. Moreover, “even if we had exactly the percentage in the studies that we see, there are other issues that are really problematic” and could determine how effective the drug is when accounting for social determinants of health, Jackson says.

“It actually makes a difference where your racial and ethnic minorities come from,” he says. “Do they come from areas of town that are more rural? Poorer? Have worse insurance access than the white people that are enrolling in these studies?”

Ultimately, “it really comes down to one thing, which is just the importance of community engagement, which drives more inclusive enrollment, rather than just a record of diverse enrollment,” Jackson says. When a vaccine is developed, trust has to be there in order to get the African American community to buy in and get the shot to curb the spread of disease.

“And so you need to build that trust, when the vaccine is still being tested, rather than waiting for the vaccine to be approved by the FDA,” Jackson says. “Because that’s what’s really going to drive trust, is that people understand the whole process and can attest to their involvement in it.”

How do you feel about the COVID 19 vaccines? What questions do you have? Why?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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Doctors say CDC should warn people the side effects from Covid vaccine shots won’t be ‘a walk in the park’

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Some Health Care Workers Are Wary Of Getting COVID-19 Vaccines

listen or read their comments by clicking the link above
Source: Npr
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November 24, 20205:08 AM ETHeard on Morning Edition

PUBLISHED MON, NOV 23 2020 4:19 PM EST, UPDATED TUE, NOV 24 2020 6:36 PM EST
Berkeley Lovelace Jr.@BERKELEYJR
Source: CNBC

  • The CDC must be transparent about the side effects people may experience after getting their first shot of a coronavirus vaccine, doctors urged during a meeting Monday with CDC advisors.
  • Dr. Sandra Fryhofer said that both Pfizer’s and Moderna’s Covid-19 vaccines require two doses and she worries whether her patients will come back for a second dose because of potentially unpleasant side effects after the first shot.
  • Both companies acknowledged that their vaccines could induce side effects that are similar to symptoms associated with mild Covid-19, such as muscle pain, chills and headache.

A volunteer is injected with a vaccine as he participates in a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccination study at the Research Centers of America, in Hollywood, Florida, September 24, 2020.Marco Bello | Reuters

Public health officials and drugmakers need to warn people that coronavirus vaccine shots may have some rough side effects so they know what to expect and aren’t scared away from getting the second dose, doctors urged during a meeting Monday with CDC advisors.

The recommendations come as states prepare to distribute the potentially life-saving vaccinations as early as next month.

Dr. Sandra Fryhofer of the American Medical Association said both Pfizer’s and Moderna’s Covid-19 vaccines require two doses at varying intervals. As a practicing physician, she said she worries whether her patients will come back for a second dose because of the potentially unpleasant side effects they may experience after the first shot.

“We really need to make patients aware that this is not going to be a walk in the park,” Fryhofer said during a virtual meeting with the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, or ACIP, an outside group of medical experts that advise the CDC. She is also a liaison to the committee. “They are going to know they had a vaccine. They are probably not going to feel wonderful. But they’ve got to come back for that second dose.

Participants in Moderna and Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine trials told CNBC in September that they were experiencing high fever, body aches, bad headaches, daylong exhaustion and other symptoms after receiving the shots. While the symptoms were uncomfortable, and at times intense, the participants said they often went away after a day, sometimes sooner, and that it was better than getting Covid-19.

Both companies acknowledged that their vaccines could induce side effects that are similar to symptoms associated with mild Covid-19, such as muscle pain, chills and headache.

One North Carolina woman in the Moderna study who is in her 50s said she didn’t experience a fever but suffered a bad migraine that left her drained for a day and unable to focus. She said she woke up the next day feeling better after taking Excedrin but added that Moderna may need to tell people to take a day off after a second dose.

“If this proves to work, people are going to have to toughen up,” she said. “The first dose is no big deal. And then the second dose will definitely put you down for the day for sure. … You will need to take a day off after the second dose.”

During the meeting on Monday, Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said the agency would work to develop guidance if a health-care worker got a vaccine and then felt unwell the next day.

“How does that impact planning on a hospital level in terms of which staff gets vaccinated which day?” she said.

Patsy Stinchfield, a Children’s Minnesota nurse practitioner, said officials and drugmakers could try talking about the side effects in a more positive way. She said they could use language such as “response” instead of “adverse reaction.”

“These are immune responses,” said Stinchfield, a past voting member of the committee. “And so if you feel something after vaccination, you should expect to feel that. When you do, it’s normal to have some arm soreness or fatigue, some body aches and maybe even a fever. It sounds like in some of these trials, maybe even having to stay home from work.”

Dr. Grace Lee, a professor of pediatrics at the Stanford University School of Medicine, agreed, saying a coronavirus infection could be detrimental to an entire family.

“If they have to miss 14 days of work, that’s a huge amount to miss,” said Lee, who is a member of the ACIP, told the CDC. “I think we do have to think about that the vaccine itself. While there may be some short term work loss issues, I do think that has to be balanced with the risk of getting an infection.”

Stinchfield said some people in the trials have actually been disappointed when they don’t suffer the side effects being reported by others, thinking they must have gotten the placebo.

The committee meeting comes three days after Pfizer and its partner BioNTech applied for an emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration for their coronavirus vaccine.

The FDA process is expected to take a few weeks, and an advisory committee meeting to review the vaccine has been scheduled for early December. Some Americans could get their first dose of the vaccine in about a month.

ACIP is expected to call an emergency meeting to make specific recommendations on distribution once the FDA authorizes a vaccine.

Federal agencies are already sending vaccination plans around to staff. Five agencies have started telling employees they could receive Pfizer’s or Moderna’s Covid-19 vaccine in as little as eight weeks, a person with firsthand knowledge of those plans told CNBC on Friday.

What do we know about the COVID 19 vaccines? How will the vaccines impact the pandemic? Why? The vaccines are here. Will you be taking it? Why? Why not?

Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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COVID-19: Are You at Higher Risk for Severe Illness?

COVID-19: Are You at Higher Risk for Severe Illness?

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Source: CDC: COVID-19: Are You at Higher Risk for Severe Illness?
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Are you at high risk? How do you mitigate these risks? What did you learn from this CDC message? How has this article helped you and yours? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

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COVID-19 Stop the Spread of Germs

COVID-19 Stop the Spread of Germs

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Source: CDC, COVID-19 Stop the Spread of Germs
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Many of these tasks we do every day. During COVID we find that some of the must be done more often. What measures are being taken in the places you frequent? What measures would you like to see taken? Which measures have you taken yourself? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing.

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Protecting against COVID19

What You Need To Know About Handwashing

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COVID 19 Protections – Basics
Source: CDC
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There is still a lot to learn about COVID 19. Russia recently approached WHO (World Health Organization) regarding putting a COVID 19 vaccine through their tests and certifications. Many companies and organizations are working on a solution to COVID 19, so we hope that a solution is not far off. In the mean time lets be certain about some CDC (Center for Disease Control) basics that are helping to prevent the spread of COVID. What are some best practices you implement daily to protect yourself and others from COVID 19? Do you wear a mask? Do you boost your immune system? Share your comments with the community by posting below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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Using Face Masks Properly

Robert R. Redfield, MD | #COVIDStopsWithMe

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Proper Face Mask Use
Source: CDC
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With everyone across the globe being impacted in some form or fashion by COVID 19, masks have become apart of our daily wardrobe. In some cases, like in Norfolk, VA, USA, masks are required to enter some establishments. This video by the CDC educates us on the proper way to use and wear our masks to prevent the spread of COVID. How often do you go out in public? Where do you keep your mask? Do you wear a mask daily? Do you know of anyone not impacted by COVID 19? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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Diabetes & Diet

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As I shared my own health concerns with family and friends, so too they shared their concerns with me. In some cases we discovered that we had similar health concerns and we begin to share notes on our own individual journeys with our health concerns. What worked. What did not work. What we did not like. Things that just did not seem to add up and be viable options for a real solution nor good health. A few of these conversations surrounded diabetes or the danger of becoming a diabetic.

As the data from the CDC shows us from 2018 African Americans have relatively high percentages as it relates to other racial groups in the data set they provided. As you might have guessed one of the things they (family, friends and their health professionals) wanted to tackle in order to avoid becoming diabetic was to change their diets. In this case Help Guide states there are some common myths about diabetes that we should consider. They state that their is no special diet needed for diabetics. Specifically they stated “As with any healthy eating program, a diabetic diet is more about your overall dietary pattern rather than obsessing over specific foods. Aim to eat more natural, unprocessed food and less packaged and convenience foods.”

We agree that more natural or organic as well as unprocessed foods such as packaged and convenience foods do not promote good health and are not the cornerstones of a proper diet. Again we have another source confirming this belief. Here are a couple beliefs about diabetes they (Health Guide) say are myths:

Source: CDC 2019. Summary Health Statistics: National Health Interview Survey: 2018. Table A-4a.
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Myth: You must avoid sugar at all costs.

Fact: You can enjoy your favorite treats as long as you plan properly and limit hidden sugars. Dessert doesn’t have to be off limits, as long as it’s a part of a healthy meal plan.

Myth: You have to cut way down on carbs.

Fact: The type of carbohydrates you eat as well as serving size is key. Focus on whole grain carbs instead of starchy carbs since they’re high in fiber and digested slowly, keeping blood sugar levels more even.

Myth: You’ll need special diabetic meals.

Fact: The principles of healthy eating are the same—whether or not you’re diabetic. Expensive diabetic foods generally offer no special benefit.

Myth: A high-protein diet is best.

Fact: Studies have shown that eating too much protein, especially animal protein, may actually cause insulin resistance, a key factor in diabetes. A healthy diet includes protein, carbohydrates, and fats. Our bodies need all three to function properly. The key is a balanced diet.

Were any of your myths dispelled? How has your diet affected your health or how you feel day to day? What are your health concerns? What did you think of the CDC data? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth and health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Stay healthy.

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When will Corona End?

In just the last few months the United States was hit hard and fast with a mired of COVID 19 challenges. It seemed to bring the world to a stop. There are still several questions as to how we will emerge from this pandemic. One thing almost everyone can agree on is that business will not be business as usual. We are sure to see several changes come out of this. 

Perhaps the most striking thing I have learned about the corona virus is that it has been around for sometime. We have heard several reports of corona virus cases in the poultry industry and the SBA has refocused some of its support to cover the agricultural industry as a part of the CARES Act. Corona viruses are not new to livestock nor poultry producers either, reports a Texas A&M AgriLife veterinary epidemiologist. Organic or not diseased food is an important and vital concern for the consumer.

In fact the CDC noted that corona viruses common to humans typically cause mild to moderate upper respiratory tract illness similar to the common cold. Most people are likely to have had one or more of these viruses during their life time. What is different about COVID 19 is that it is a new strand or novel corona virus. As we all know this strand of corona virus (COVID 19) was first detected in Wuhan City of Hubei Providence of China.

The interesting fact about China and corona viruses is that wild life have been known to carry strands of the corona virus that can mutate, adapt and spill over into other species like human begins. Bats along with other wild life have been known to carry strands of the corona virus and are sold in live markets in China. While much is still under investigation and to be known about corona viruses, what we currently know is that domestic animals and live stock are not known to carry strands of the corona virus that spill over into human beings. Wild animals, however, do have such strands that can spill over to human beings. In fact wild civets are the sources of the corona virus that causes SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome). Civets are commonly found in southeast Asia. SARS, as you remember, was first reported around 2002 – 2003.

One notable difference in domestic animals is the camel. Domedary camels have been known to pass corona virus (MERS-COV) to humans. However, neither domestic animals nor livestock are known to pass corona viruses to humans. The respiratory and gastrointestinal systems of animals are typically affected by corona viruses as reported by Feedstuffs. So, we have been dealing with corona viruses for a long time. Should you have any questions regarding animals and livestock consult your veterinary. 

Naturally, we are just as concerned as you are regarding Corona. While the medical community may know a lot about corona viruses this virus is a new strand and it took the whole world by storm. We are waiting by cautiously, as are most, for more and up to date information. Our leaders feel confident enough that we have slowed the spread of COVID 19 to begin opening back up. However, this deadly virus is remains in our midst. We encourage you to err on the side of caution and to make informed decisions regarding your food consumption. There is, admittedly, a lot for the medical community to learn about COVID 19 as well as the community at large. What concerns do you have about COVID 19? What information can you share with the community? How has COVID 19 changed things for you? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. Keep sharing!

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Corona: Healthy is the New Normal

covid 19 shidonna raven garden and cook

As a state official stated, Corona brought everything to a screeching halt with in a matter of weeks. Having spent the last several weeks at home and some not able to work, many people are eager to see things get back to normal and to get back to work. Social distancing has heighten the importance of our connection to those people we consider friends and family as well as those we associate with on nearly a daily basis. All of us across the globe have suffered similar issues together. Loved ones on the front lines and those lost alone in hospitals to die without a final proper burial. No single event in modern history has been more galvanizing than Corona. As many of us are eager to get back to normal, we are revealed to see things opening back up slowly but surely. We are reminded and cautioned by leaders such as Governor Northam and T.D. Jakes that Corona is still indeed with us. We have simply slowed the spread of it. So as we begin to venture back out into our communities and return to work, we must be reminded that Corona is without a cure and remains in our midst.

Some of the hardest hit communities have been the elderly, African American and Hispanic communities. The CDC (Center for Disease Control) stated that 30 % of the African American population are Corona patients while they make up only 13% of the US population. There are many factors that contribute to these numbers. Population density is one. That can include a densely populated home or an urban environment that tends to be densely populated. Lack of paid sick leave and insurance is another factor the CDC is saying contributes to these numbers. Preexisting health conditions or concerns is another contributing factor and is why we write to you today. While we are passionate about gardening and cooking, it is because doing these things properly can lead to good health. With Corona in our midst and a matter of good practice, being healthy has become the new normal. Get hit hard by a pandemic and you will begin to refocus your health goals and what is important in life. As we can see from the CDC statistics being in good health is one way to combat Corona.

Stay Masked Up
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  • Do an honest assessment of your current state of health
  • Do everything possible to be as healthy as possible that includes eating right (a diet appropriate to your specific needs)
  • Stay informed and follow the guidelines of each re opening phase
  • If you do not know where to get correct information, start with the CDC

This gives us pause to think critically about the social economical issues that minority populations face daily. The CDC numbers are alarming and illuminating to social economic issues which can neither be ignored nor accepted. How has Corona impacted you and your loved ones? What will you do differently since Corona? What re 3 things you will do today to improve your health? What questions do you have about the foods you consume daily? Share your comments with the community by posting them below. Share the wealth of health with your friends and family by sharing this article with 3 people today. As always you are the best part of what we do. You are at the center of our thoughts and prayers.

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